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What are you reading? - Page 266

post #3976 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by green bastard View Post
Are you serious? The Classical Russian Realism has shaped me like no other literary period and I am very fond of Chekhov, Turgenev and Pushkin, but between them and the Giants of Russian Literature, Tolstoi and especially Dostoyevsky, are world's apart. To my mind, Dostoyevsky's psychological depth has never been reached again ever. That being said, Gogol is great and I am reading his Plays and Petersburg Tales by the side, already having had the pleasure of finishing The Brothers Karamazov for the second time.

Excuse me, if this sounds aggressive.


It's not that it's aggressive as much as it's dumb. (Forgive me for being aggressive.)

That said, you can't compare the two. Dostoevski does probe the deepest recesses of the human heart, but that's not where Gogol or Chekhov (not to mention Pushkin!) go. There isn't moch overlap between their respective literatures, and if you ask me, each responds to a different literary need. I know that no Chekhov could replace Dostoevski and that no Dostoevski could ever replace Chekhov.
post #3977 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lemmings View Post


About 90% of the way through.

And what do you think? I have it on my shelf. Worth turning my attention to?

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Originally Posted by UncleCozy View Post

Read it too long ago to remember why loved it, but I do remember that I loved it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by green bastard View Post
The Brothers Karamazov


Aufbau Berlin/Weimar Verlag edition

The very best! But it might cause breakdown and depression. Just saying.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pinhas View Post
Finally got around to start:



Anything I should keep in mind while reading or any other tips that will help me get through this? (haven't red a 1000+ page book in quite a while)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
Protip: stop reading it now.
Do not stop reading it. First of all, even if you hate it, it's extremely relevant. You're effectively ignorant if you haven't read it"”even if only debate it. Amazon.com lists it as one of the best selling books ever. And though you'll find yourself often smirking and sometimes outraged at A.R., many of her ideas will probably effect you and the ideas will, in the very least, cause you to think hard about life, society and America's economic, political and social economies. I know that while I'm hardly A.R.'s greatest fan, the book effected my own (as well as many of my friends') worldview substantially. So read on and review it here when you're done.


Quote:
Originally Posted by binge View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt View Post
why do you hate our freedoms?

+1
post #3978 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorialism View Post
Do not stop reading it. First of all, even if you hate it, it's extremely relevant. You're effectively ignorant if you haven't read it"”even if only debate it. Amazon.com lists it as one of the best selling books ever. And though you'll find yourself often smirking and sometimes outraged at A.R., many of her ideas will probably effect you and the ideas will, in the very least, cause you to think hard about life, society and America's economic, political and social economies. I know that while I'm hardly A.R.'s greatest fan, the book effected my own (as well as many of my friends') worldview substantially. So read on and review it here when you're done.

Srs question here. It's been a bit since I've read Atlas Shrugged, but I seem to remember a badly written book that presented a naive, highly idealized version of capitalism. It's quite likely that I missed something, but I don't remember it being thought provoking or providing much of anything in the way of new or interesting material. I'm pretty damn fiscally conservative and very much for private enterprise and I still thought it was weak.
post #3979 of 5745
Quote:
That said, you can't compare the two. Dostoevski does probe the deepest recesses of the human heart, but that's not where Gogol or Chekhov (not to mention Pushkin!) go. There isn't much overlap between their respective literatures, and if you ask me, each responds to a different literary need. I know that no Chekhov could replace Dostoevski and that no Dostoevski could ever replace Chekhov.

I'm fully aware of the differences between a playwright and a novelist in general and even more so between Chekhov and Dostoevsky, thank you. Regarding Russian literature in general, at the point of the sword I would never choose Chekhov over Dostoevsky, that was my whole point.

Forgive me my woolly style.


Quote:
Outside of Chekhov, this is my favorite piece of Russian literature. Get ahold of the Guerney translation if possible.
post #3980 of 5745
post #3981 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by sartorialism View Post
[In Cold Blood]

And what do you think? I have it on my shelf. Worth turning my attention to?


Yeah I thought it was great. Took me about a month to get through the first 100 pages, but once I finally got into it I was able to finish it off in a few hours.

It was interesting to finish it and then go online and see all of the actual crime-scene photos, mugshots etc. too.
post #3982 of 5745
Flapper and Great Gatsby
post #3983 of 5745
Got it as a gift at work. This in parallel for pleasure reading.
post #3984 of 5745
Just finished Losing My Cool, moving on to The Promise
post #3985 of 5745
I'm mid way through Less Than Zero. That book sucks the happiness out of me as I read it. I feel strung out myself after 60 pages.
post #3986 of 5745
If, in a sort of New-Critical or Russian Formalist way, you choose to consider literary works as autonomous texts, with the value of texts inhering solely in the texts themselves whilst issues of authorial intent, historical context and influence are secondary or entirely irrelevant, then I can see how you might look at certain works by Gogol, Dostoevsky and Chekhov and see three very different authors with different styles and subject matters. I think there are similarities between the three authors even in this case; but the historical path of Russian literature following Pushkin seems to me a fairly clear one, with Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov all drawing upon their respective predecessors and being discussed in similar terms by the various critical schools of the time. Dostoevsky's early works were written in direct response to or as a means of elaborating Gogol's themes and perceived politics; and whilst there sometimes seems the perception that the format of these writers' works clearly differentiates them, it shouldn't be forgotten that Chekhov was just as much a short story writer as he was a playwright, whilst some of Dostoevsky and Tolstoy's best works were also short stories.
post #3987 of 5745
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

I Vonnegut. Good ol' Indiana boy.
post #3988 of 5745
People who eat darkness
post #3989 of 5745
Just finished RUN: The Mind-Body Method of Running by Feel by Matt Fitzgerald. I've read probably a half-dozen or so running books in the past, but this one really brought it all together in terms of the mind-body connection. It made me happy to train again, and brought home the point about managing your mind as you run.

Still working on Midnight's Children.
post #3990 of 5745
the sorrows of young werther - goethe
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