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What are you reading? - Page 80

post #1186 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sartorian View Post
100 pages into Junot Diaz's "The Brief Wonderful Life of Oscar Wao." Excellent thus far.

RIP DFW.

I liked Wao a lot. Interesting that you'd put your RIP DFW in this post, since Wao had clearly reflects some DFW influence, or at least similarities, such as the use of footnotes.
post #1187 of 5738
Fathers and Sons by Turgenev
post #1188 of 5738
One of my favorite books. A masterpiece.
Quote:
Originally Posted by IUtoSLU View Post
Fathers and Sons by Turgenev
post #1189 of 5738
Wellville was good. On page one of Infinite Jest.
post #1190 of 5738
Tender is the Night
post #1191 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
One of my favorite books. A masterpiece.

Quote:
Originally Posted by IUtoSLU View Post
Fathers and Sons by Turgenev

His Sketches from a Hunter's Album, is even better IMO. He has a command of the short story that rivals even Checkhov.
post #1192 of 5738
War by Gwynne Dyer
post #1193 of 5738
William Carlos Williams, Selected Poems. Fabulous.
post #1194 of 5738
I just finished Wonder Boys. Will now start, at the request of my girlfriend, Cebu by Peter Bacho.

post #1195 of 5738
Neuromancer by William Gibson.
post #1196 of 5738
Austerlitz by Sebald
post #1197 of 5738
Sperm Wars by Robin Baker
post #1198 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post
I liked Wao a lot. Interesting that you'd put your RIP DFW in this post, since Wao had clearly reflects some DFW influence, or at least similarities, such as the use of footnotes.

You of course know how much us legal types love our footnotes. Working in the law has made me appreciate footnotes in a very irrational and inexplicable way. Before that, only DFW managed to make them seem "fun".

Lawyerdad, which Pynchon novel would you recommend?

BTW, to all those Murakami readers out there, I read Norwegian Wood, South of the Border/East with the Sun and Kafka on the Shore consecutively, and I'd not recommend going to his well too many times. He's a great writer, but he's very similar to Paul Auster in that all his novels explore variations on very similar themes. I got very tired of reading about adolescent boys getting whacked off by older women and how that was the great moment of the dudes's dreams. His books are great, but I think it's best to space them out a bit (not uncommon for many writers, but still, you have my warning).
post #1199 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sartorian View Post
You of course know how much us legal types love our footnotes. Working in the law has made me appreciate footnotes in a very irrational and inexplicable way. Before that, only DFW managed to make them seem "fun".

Lawyerdad, which Pynchon novel would you recommend?

BTW, to all those Murakami readers out there, I read Norwegian Wood, South of the Border/East with the Sun and Kafka on the Shore consecutively, and I'd not recommend going to his well too many times. He's a great writer, but he's very similar to Paul Auster in that all his novels explore variations on very similar themes. I got very tired of reading about adolescent boys getting whacked off by older women and how that was the great moment of the dudes's dreams. His books are great, but I think it's best to space them out a bit (not uncommon for many writers, but still, you have my warning).

With Pynchon, I would say that Gravity's Rainbow is really the "ultimate" Pynchon book. I also liked Vineland, and it's probably a more "accessible" introduction. But I'd probably jump right in with GR and either love it or hate it.
post #1200 of 5738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sartorian View Post
Lawyerdad, which Pynchon novel would you recommend?

BTW, to all those Murakami readers out there, I read Norwegian Wood, South of the Border/East with the Sun and Kafka on the Shore consecutively, and I'd not recommend going to his well too many times. He's a great writer, but he's very similar to Paul Auster in that all his novels explore variations on very similar themes. I got very tired of reading about adolescent boys getting whacked off by older women and how that was the great moment of the dudes's dreams. His books are great, but I think it's best to space them out a bit (not uncommon for many writers, but still, you have my warning).

As you say, this is not uncommon - many writers keep on going back to the same well for inspiration. For me, "The Wind-up Bird Chronicles" and "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World" are his two most enjoyable books, and they also differ a fair bit from his other books. John Irving is another author who, although enjoyable, keeps on recycling the same themes in his works - young man/older woman; New Hampshire; Canada and a few other themes. Out of Irving's books, I most enjoyed "A Son of the Circus" as again, it was different from his other works.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lawyerdad View Post
With Pynchon, I would say that Gravity's Rainbow is really the "ultimate" Pynchon book. I also liked Vineland, and it's probably a more "accessible" introduction. But I'd probably jump right in with GR and either love it or hate it.

As LawyerDad said, GR is difficult. I'd tend to read "The Crying of Lot 49" and "Vineland" first as they are enjoyable to read and much more approachable. Frankly, after the first few chapters, I really found much of Gravity's Rainbow to be quite a chore.
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