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McMansion or not? - Page 35

post #511 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post
Do you want to read about architecture or look at architecture? What are specifically interested in?
Read about. I'm primarily interested in the basics of design. I presume some of this dates back centuries or even further, but I want to know what factors (proportions etc.) come together to make a pleasing building and space. I'm a bit more interested about residential buildings over commercial buildings if that makes any difference. I know next to nothing about architecture.
post #512 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post
Read about. I'm primarily interested in the basics of design. I presume some of this dates back centuries or even further, but I want to know what factors (proportions etc.) come together to make a pleasing building and space. I'm a bit more interested about residential buildings over commercial buildings if that makes any difference.

I know next to nothing about architecture.

Then I'm going to again suggest Witold. It is completely accessible to the layman.
post #513 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
^^ It would be nice if someone can share some examples of a modern mansion, as we now have many examples of McMansions.
I looked for something modern but came up with nothing worth posting.

This is what I think of when I think of a mansion:



Majestically sited on 242 fertile hectares, or nearly 600 acres, in County Kildare, Ireland, Lyons Demesne stands as a striking ­example of classic Georgian ­architecture. The symmetry and proportions of the house are reflected in the composition of its formal ­gardens, establishing an ­ambience of timeless harmony and elegance.

Commissioned by Lord Cloncurry in 1785, the historic manor is in impeccable condition, having recently ­undergone a ­total refurbishment which was recognized as outstanding when it received the Europa Nostra and Institut International des Châteaux Historiques joint award for refurbishment. Contemporary conveniences are integrated into living areas of ­sophisticated design, allowing for a lifestyle of unique luxury.















post #514 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post
Read about. I'm primarily interested in the basics of design. I presume some of this dates back centuries or even further, but I want to know what factors (proportions etc.) come together to make a pleasing building and space. I'm a bit more interested about residential buildings over commercial buildings if that makes any difference. I know next to nothing about architecture.
I recommend this book. It's very simple. They've basically documented how humans have built their environments throughout history and deduced from that some very simplified concepts of design. They cover every scale of architecture, from entire town planning concepts all the way down to how to lay out a kitchen (like how the faucet, work space, stove, and other components should relate to each other). The book was designed for the purpose of introducing laymen to spatial principles that they could use on their own to adapt their own surroundings. The book is organized with bolded passes and non-bolded descriptions, so it's very easy to browse through and pick out topics of architecture that are interesting to you. It has a cult-like following. It's one of those books that explains things you already perceive and makes you go "Of course! Why didn't I notice that?" A couple others: Steen Rasmussen's Experience Architecture, which explains how people relate to architecture in a more linear and narrative way. It introduces many multi-disciplinary topics that relate to architecture such as health, literature, art, sciences, sociology, etc. Francis Ching's Form Space Order, which introduces a broad range of architectural methods related to form, geometry and space in the form of an animated "visual dictionary" of architecture styles, from classical to modern. It talks about things like symmetry, proportion, circulation, orientation, modularity, anthropomorphism, etc. I've seen all of these books in Borders or Barnes & Nobles, so they are widely available.
post #515 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by CouttsClient View Post
I am most certainly an only child
And I may well be older than your mother.
post #516 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enthusiastic Reader
Stephen, is it possible to turn a small, cheap, and plasticized shithole of a house into a fine home by simply renovating the home with natural materials?
Yes, it is. Anyone can do it. [IMG][/IMG]
post #517 of 539
I'm coming out of SF retirement to say this: I live in a house that was built in the 1920s and has all of the natural materials and all that good stuff, and it's nice and has it's charm and all that. But, there are many a morning when I wish I had a huge ass bathroom with double sinks and a gigantic ass jetted tub like all of the McMansions have. Sometimes I think I would enjoy those amenities more than I enjoy the charm of living in a well built house made of natural materials.
post #518 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramuman View Post
My parents still use a space heater in their bedroom at night so that they can have the rest of the house at about 50F. It harkens back to perhaps 20-25 years or so ago when they had to squeeze every penny they could. They rode the dot com bubble up and thankfully not down, but the heater stayed.

Some space heaters have a nice low hum that blocks out background noise and helps you go to sleep as well. I had a roommate in college who always turned a fan on to sleep, because the noise acted like a sleep machine.
post #519 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by odoreater View Post

I'm coming out of SF retirement to say this: I live in a house that was built in the 1920s and has all of the natural materials and all that good stuff, and it's nice and has it's charm and all that. But, there are many a morning when I wish I had a huge ass bathroom with double sinks and a gigantic ass jetted tub like all of the McMansions have. Sometimes I think I would enjoy those amenities more than I enjoy the charm of living in a well built house made of natural materials.
You don't need a McMansion to have that ... you need to renovate and/or add.

I recently renovated one of the old Albert Farr mansions in Piedmont (in the Bay Area). Built in the early 1900s, it had ten bedrooms, no closets, and three tiny bathrooms. It now has five bedrooms each with a walk-in closet and its very on rather accommodating bath.
Edited by RSS - 10/5/11 at 10:58am
post #520 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by RSS View Post

You don't need a McMansion to have that ... you need to renovate and/or add.
I recently renovated one of the old Albert Farr mansions in Piedmont (in the Bay Area). Built in the early 1900s, It had ten bedrooms, no closets, and three tiny bathrooms. It now has five bedrooms each with a walk-in closet and its very on rather accommodating bath.

That's awesome. Do you have any photos of any of your work?
post #521 of 539
Seeing this thread bumped it made me wonder. Is SH going to turn into RSS? That would be an interesting architectural make over!
post #522 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Seeing this thread bumped it made me wonder. Is SH going to turn into RSS? That would be an interesting architectural make over!
Someone has to take my place ... I'm cooling it in my 'old age.' Although Piob ... while I've had some heated disagreements in my day ... I don't ever recall resorted to calling someone 'really fucking stupid.' I'm just too Episcopalian for that approach.
Edited by RSS - 10/5/11 at 1:03pm
post #523 of 539
Sup bitches. Lifestyle shot in front of my crib.

1906
post #524 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Sup bitches. Lifestyle shot in front of my crib.
1906

You're not quite as..."Black" as I thought you'd be
post #525 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by patrickBOOTH View Post

That's awesome. Do you have any photos of any of your work?
While I hesitate to post photos of clients' homes in a forum ... I'll risk posting some shots of a client's 'garage' designed to compliment an existing shingle style house.

The photo below is the rear facade of a carriage house designed to hold 16 vintage European sports cars. The car on the lower left (the project uses two tier parking lifts) is the last Jacuar 150 off the assembly line; its prior owner was Princess Grace. The car above it is the Aston Martin used in The Birds. Behind the closed doors is a working garage with hydraulic lifts.

I'll note that the roof was originally designed to be slate. But sometimes the architect doesn't prevail in all his desires. EDIT: In response to a PM, the building is a garage ... not a garage addition to a house. The house is a separate structure about a two minute walk away.
Sullivan_VANNELLI_001B.jpg

Below is the Porte Cochere paved with black basalt. Featured is one of the client's 'less' vintage cars ... an Alfa 8C.
IMG_0680.jpg

Next we have the 'auto' library ... as part of a 2000 sq. ft. 'home office' on the second floor. The timbers are from a recently demolished mill in New Hampshire. The opening in the middle of the shelving is a pass-through to a small kitchen. The furnishings are temoprary pieces as we awaited delivery of the final.

Sullivan_VANNELLI_004.jpg
Edited by RSS - 10/5/11 at 4:28pm
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