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McMansion or not? - Page 2

post #16 of 539
There is a sucker born every minute. These days, a sucker can be found filling with more useless shit the garage of a house made of PVC siding, wood chips pressed with glue, and saran wrap on a slab of inferior concrete. It's not called McMansion. It's called sort of home. In the sense that a hunting dog is sort of vicious.
post #17 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
There is a sucker born every minute. These days, a sucker can be found filling with more useless shit the garage of a house made of PVC siding, wood chips pressed with glue, and saran wrap on a slab of inferior concrete. It's not called McMansion. It's called sort of home. In the sense that a hunting dog is sort of vicious.

Wood chips pressed with glue leave more trees standing than roll-planing logs for conventional plywood and an order of magnitude more than planking.

Saran wrap, depending on application either lowers heat losses by convection, saving tonnes of coal and curies of radioactivity, or blocks vapor, preventing use of fungicides to kill the mold that makes people sick.

Inferior concrete prevents further water infiltration and even structural deficiencies that can lead to building failure.

Unnaturally smooth wallboard virtually eliminated horsehair in walls and slashed sillicosis in plasterers.

Common connotation for a hunting dog is a bird dog, which is less vicious than your average cat.

It may be a McMansion, it may be a real home where people grow, love, and learn.

(All courtesy of someone in a rural area that is feeling the unwanted invasion of McMansions, and who grew up in a house noted on an 1888 map, that was built on inferior stone foundations with horsehair plaster walls that curved naturally, leaky windows resulting in GWs of lost thermal energy, and I-don't-even-want-to-guess how many cedars chopped into thousands of irregular wall and roof shingles)

Regards,
Huntsman
post #18 of 539
Like certain Rodin sculptures, McMansions eschew aestheic function for scale. The quality, however, is more akin to a Kostabi painting.
post #19 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
Wood chips pressed with glue leave more trees standing than roll-planing logs for conventional plywood and an order of magnitude more than planking.

Saran wrap, depending on application either lowers heat losses by convection, saving tonnes of coal and curies of radioactivity, or blocks vapor, preventing use of fungicides to kill the mold that makes people sick.

Inferior concrete prevents further water infiltration and even structural deficiencies that can lead to building failure.

Unnaturally smooth wallboard virtually eliminated horsehair in walls and slashed sillicosis in plasterers.

Common connotation for a hunting dog is a bird dog, which is less vicious than your average cat.

It may be a McMansion, it may be a real home where people grow, love, and learn.

(All courtesy of someone in a rural area that is feeling the unwanted invasion of McMansions, and who grew up in a house noted on an 1888 map, that was built on inferior stone foundations with horsehair plaster walls that curved naturally, leaky windows resulting in GWs of lost thermal energy, and I-don't-even-want-to-guess how many cedars chopped into thousands of irregular wall and roof shingles)

Regards,
Huntsman

Every minute.
post #20 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBZ
Interesting. I would have thought someone named Mr. Checks would have heritage that was, well, Czech.

Thank you, thank you. I'll be here all week.

Where're you folks from? Springfield? Great. First time here? Hey, is this thing on? Hello?
post #21 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Every minute.

John, if you're going to call me a sucker, enter the dialectic and say something rather than posting the verbal equivalent of a windowpane. I would not show you such little respect as implied by that twaddle.

Regards,
Huntsman
post #22 of 539
Oh snap!
post #23 of 539
"My McMansion is more tawdry than yours!"
post #24 of 539
There was an article about this a short while back regarding people moving into neighborhoods, buying up 3 or 4 lots as teardowns and then building one massive home on the 4 lots. I can maybe see this in a rich town where the homes are far apart but when you do this in a neighborhood full of 1960's homes on small lots it just looks wrong.
post #25 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman
John, if you're going to call me a sucker, enter the dialectic and say something rather than posting the verbal equivalent of a windowpane. I would not show you such little respect as implied by that twaddle.

Regards,
Huntsman

Yeah. Well. A lot of changes in construction techniques have taken place between 1888 and 2006. If you argue at the extremes, go play with yourself. A well built home in 2006 will combine sound techiques and materials from the past and the present. The crap being built out of OSB, Tyvek, and inferior slabs is a waste. Period. You might think it is a nice place to live, a nice family settlement, but in fact the people who buy those homes are being ripped off. They are getting into a big place (in square feet), and it seems like they have hit the jackpot, but if they were to buy something more modest and decently built, they would fare better in the long run. I have seen homes five years old falling to pieces in the wind. I have seen homes five years old molding. Saran wrapped and all.
post #26 of 539
As with most things in this US of A, we want more, not better, now, not later. And we want things as cheaply as possible.

What I love the most about some of the McMansions I have personally visited is the people have spent so much on the house itself that the interiors are almost bare. Or poorly furnished. Dull.
post #27 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnapril
Yeah. Well. A lot of changes in construction techniques have taken place between 1888 and 2006. If you argue at the extremes, go play with yourself. A well built home in 2006 will combine sound techiques and materials from the past and the present. The crap being built out of OSB, Tyvek, and inferior slabs is a waste. Period. You might think it is a nice place to live, a nice family settlement, but in fact the people who buy those homes are being ripped off. They are getting into a big place (in square feet), and it seems like they have hit the jackpot, but if they were to buy something more modest and decently built, they would fare better in the long run. I have seen homes five years old falling to pieces in the wind. I have seen homes five years old molding. Saran wrapped and all.

I was hardly playing to extremes when I was speaking of essentially balloon-framed (now evolved to platform- or stick-framed) construction, the most common in the U.S. throughout time by far, and further, speaking of my direct experience. Ignoring even that, I had no idea of the compass of your thoughts in the matter, so how could I be accused of going to extremes short of caves?

A cause for surprise might be the extent to which I agree with you, apart from the animosity; as I mentioned, we are being invaded out here with developments of sadly-built cookie-cutter 3000 sq.ft. houses running 340k. The owners buy them and put up little brick posts at either end of the drive, like some manor house or something. I also appreciate the work of the past; most of my possesions are either antique, the work of craftsmen, or like the cherry desk (replete with handcut dovetails) I am sitting behind, the work of my hand.

Probably we shan't come to terms on materials, and though I can't really say anything in favor of PVC, as a nearly-minted engineer and a guy who just loves trees, I won't fault OSB. Tyvek isn't so bad, either, unless as a cover for poor workmanship, an item I appreciate with 40mph winds gusting to 55 all day. In any event, materials alone do not a poor house make, and lots of GCs out there are happy to pull any shortcut they can to get a bigger margin while roping in more people -- surely a contributor in all those wrecked fresh houses.

A parting gift for you -- a photograph of mine, that as with all my photographs, was named before I shot it. This one is called "Progress??"



Regards,
Huntsman
post #28 of 539
In Indianapolis (US midwestern corssroads), there are terrible examples of what could be good materials tossed into a build it as fast and as cheaply as you can template, and then pawned off on the unsuspecting for 120-150K. What is lost? The forests and fields these houses replace. The possibility of intelligently-designed communities. I don't know the long-term effect. I am hoping for a backlash, where the consumer demands quality, proper workmanship, and value.

You still get what you pay for, but not even that if you don't know something about what you're getting. Armani Collezioni is the McMansion of suits is my best effort at describing the present state of affairs.
post #29 of 539
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huntsman View Post
A parting gift for you -- a photograph of mine, that as with all my photographs, was named before I shot it. This one is called "Progress??"


I wonder how many of these went into foreclosure.
post #30 of 539
Is Huntsman less of a gigantic self-parody now than he was four years ago?
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