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Air Travel - Page 4

post #46 of 53
Shorter flights: Jeans and navy blazer or a corduroy suit, slightly roomy slip-ons of some sort to be kicked off discreetly, turtleneck sweater or shirt with crewneck sweater. (Business suit if I have to, for meeting people straight away after arrival. I normally see to it that I have time and opportunity to shower and change on arrival, before meeting people.)

Longer flights: Much the same, but if going on holiday, or flying for a completely private reason, such as vacations, etc., I have been tempted to go for comfort rather than formal style. I don't like wearing sweats myself, but I really couldn't care about what any other travellers are wearing, any more than I would care what "people" wear on trains or buses. Some people dress well, others don't.

A bedraggled and wrinkled business suit looks really pathetic, and far worse than a pair of jeans and a polo shirt would after the same amount of time. Booze isn't really necessary on most flights - and in any case, it's normally far cheaper in the air than on the ground, so I don't normally give the booze much thought. Leg-room and the possibility of sleep (and the lack of cigarettes) are my most important worries.
post #47 of 53
Since my wonderful annual (or sometimes bi-annually) flight to Argentina consists of:

Leaving my house and driving about 1 hour to MIA
20 minutes Parking at MIA
Arriving 3 hours prior to flight
Checking in my bags, assuring my seat assignment, spending pointless time with whomever drove me to the airport (family member)
Boarding flight, waiting at least 30 minutes for the flight to taxi and take off
Flying for about 9 hours (non-stop) to EZE
Landing at EZE and going through customs and getting my bags, another 2 1/2 hours (minimum)
Driving for another hour from EZE to Buenos Aires

= About 17 hours of total travel time.

Thus, I wear jeans or comfortable cotton pants, a conformable tee, and a zip sweater for when it gets cold on the airplane. I also normally wear a pair of over the calf cotton socks with a pair of comfortable sneakers.

I have yet to bring my own booze (I don't really want to drink if I am not flying with anyone else), but I have brought my own snacks.

Jon.
post #48 of 53
I recall, from some wine magazine, that alcohol must be served by flight attendants, at least within the United States.
post #49 of 53
post #50 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt

Are you offering? Cus, if you are I accept.

Jon.
post #51 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoopee
I recall, from some wine magazine, that alcohol must be served by flight attendants, at least within the United States.


This is true. However, when seated in F and J, where alcohol is free, the alcohol must be served by the FA, but does not have to be provided by the airline. Simply hand the FA your booze, and ask them to pour a cup for you. If you are stuck in Y, no such luck.
post #52 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragdoll
I think Sysdoc has got the right idea. Comfort is king expecially when confronted with 16 plus hours in a flying tin box. I only differ with him 1)on when to get the sweats out (I put mine on before leaving for the airport, very ugly and I hope not to run into any SFer's boarding the plane) and 2) that I'm in the back in cattle class.
Apparently, running into SFers wouldn't matter, if I am to believe the vitriol on this thread against caring what one looks like while traveling.
post #53 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Strike
so I don't normally give the booze much thought. Leg-room and the possibility of sleep (and the lack of cigarettes) are my most important worries.

It is still possible to tamper with smoke detectors. There are other methods too. But post 9/11, there is less tolerance for those who break the law.
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