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Air Travel - Page 3

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragdoll
I confess that I am one of those ugly people that wear a sweatsuit on long haul transcontinental flights.
John Waters specifically condemned such attire.
post #32 of 53
I enjoy champagne in the air. But sometimes it is not served in flutes. Extra strength melatonin and loads of water come in handy then.
post #33 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by rip
This is exactly the right thread for this. If you have any doubts, just read what some of the posters choose to wear while flying.
Well, I was trying to make it light hearted, but now I'll just recommend that you take the hoodies = destruction of humanity attitude to Andy's. Or better yet, FNB.com.
post #34 of 53
Nix on FNB. He just posted pictures of his graphic cashmere sweaters and hoodies .
post #35 of 53
I'm a bit surprised about the comments made so far. I wear whatever I feel like when I fly long haul. It actually depends most on what makes sense either before my departure or after my arrival. However, as soon as I get to my seat I hand my coat to the air hostess, get my 'flight attire' out of my hand luggage and get changed in the lavatory. Five minutes later I am in comfortable sweat pants and a nice polo shirt and enjoy my first pre-takeoff champagne. This way I don't have to worry if food or drink gets spilled on my clothes, I don't sweat into the clothes I'll wear after landing and I feel perfectly comfortable to have a nice and long nap. The posts here make me start to understand why I often get these strange looks especially by the somewhat dressed-up folks once I exit the lavatory in my comfortable flying attire. Even most frequent flyers seem to prefer staying in the same old clothes for up to 15 hours (plus the time before and after the flight). Sorry, but I find that rather repulsive indeed.
post #36 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by sysdoc
I'm a bit surprised about the comments made so far.

I wear whatever I feel like when I fly long haul. It actually depends most on what makes sense either before my departure or after my arrival.

However, as soon as I get to my seat I hand my coat to the air hostess, get my 'flight attire' out of my hand luggage and get changed in the lavatory. Five minutes later I am in comfortable sweat pants and a nice polo shirt and enjoy my first pre-takeoff champagne.

This way I don't have to worry if food or drink gets spilled on my clothes, I don't sweat into the clothes I'll wear after landing and I feel perfectly comfortable to have a nice and long nap.

The posts here make me start to understand why I often get these strange looks especially by the somewhat dressed-up folks once I exit the lavatory in my comfortable flying attire. Even most frequent flyers seem to prefer staying in the same old clothes for up to 15 hours (plus the time before and after the flight). Sorry, but I find that rather repulsive indeed.
What shoes do you wear?
post #37 of 53
Hey at least you wear a polo! Whenever I go over an ocean I change into pj's. Sleeping naked is a practice best left behind closed doors.

I doubt most people get offended by comfortable attire. The "strange looks" likely stem from jealousy. But they are rarer on Asian routes, where people freely slip off their shoes, change socks upon liftoff, and rarely dress up on planes. Certain carriers provide somewhat disposable sleepwear, too.
post #38 of 53
Light shirt, dark polywool/wool trouser, dark jacket, (and tie if it´s neccesary).
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
What shoes do you wear?
I have to confess that on long hauls, I fly either Business or First. I have yet to come across an airline that wouldn't supply you with some kind of shoes/socks for the flying period. I do admit, however that the lavatory is dangerous ground as far as the floor is concerned. I am always making sure that I am wearing something (typically those funny slip-ons) that keeps my feet from getting in touch with the more or less disgusting liquids on the floor. It is true that most good airlines supply some kind of pjs or sweat suits in Business or First, but they usually come in tent sizes (XXL and up) to fit even the biggest passengers. I rather bring my own stuff that fits me. Whoopee, there's absolutely nothing wrong with pjs. After all, sleep is the most valuable thing one can get on those long flights. I don't pay for Business or First because of the food, but merely because of my sleep. I agree that sleeping without clothes is a bit difficult to realize, even though some airlines crank up the temperature so high that one would indeed like to strip off.
post #40 of 53
i think pjs are fine, too, esp on long hauls.

there's no rule, but i usually go for comfort, which usually means loafers, chinos, polo/casual collared shirt, and casual blazer of some kind--mighty handy for holding passport/tix.

for long hauls (6h+, or 5h'ish red-eye), i should really do a better job packing and prepare pjs or whatnot--esp on those 12h flights--but i haven't bothered.
post #41 of 53
Change in the lavatory on an airplane? What airline do you fly on where that is possible? There is barely room for me to stand up in the lavatory, and I am only a skinny 6' 2", 155 lbs. I have no idea how really large people manage to use them at all. I can't imagine actually changing clothes in a space that small!
post #42 of 53
Last year I made a lot of red-eye trans-Atlantic flights, practically once per month, and pjs were key to getting enough sleep on the plane that I didn't look like a zombie when I arrived at my destination. I'd always get a few strange looks from the less enlightened. Sometimes not even pjs could save me from a sleepless flight. I'm not a graceful sleeper.

My mother also taught me to be well-dressed on airplanes, and I've noticed that dressing well gets you better service as well--upgrades, free drinks, the better wine from first class ... Thanks Mom!
post #43 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by rip
If one wants to witness first-hand a microcosm of the decay and coarsening of the culture, one needs only to look at the clothing worn by most air travelers. One needs only to dress like a jackass to be treated like an animal.

If one wishes to appear increasingly out of touch with the culture at large, hopelessly mired in narcissistic nostalgia for a time that never actually existed, one needs only to begin claiming that the sartorial habits of air travelers, in some mysterious manner, signify growing cultural decadence. One might also write entirely in the third person, thereby increasing the reader's sense that the author simply does not understand how to scale the formality of a behavior, be it dressing or writing, in a way that is commensurate with the seriousness and formality of the situation itself.

I wear jeans, zip-up boots (easier to take them off at the metal detectors), and either a collared long-sleeve shirt with a jacket or, for thoroughly casual flights, a t-shirt and a hoodie. If I think I'm going to sleep on the flight, I'll pack a hoodie regardless, for the reason globetrotter mentioned.

I've thought about flasking before, but I always assumed they would be forbidden and that I'd get my flask confiscated at the security check. I'm not sure why, except that I assumed that the airlines would have regulations against it in order to force you to buy alcohol.

I have at least a liter of water with me on all flights as well.
post #44 of 53
To clear up a few things: Booze is always free in F and J, and, on int'l carriers, in Y as well. On US based carriers, there will never be free booze in Y. If you are on a 747, 777, A330 or A340, there is probably enough room to change in the lav. Maybe even on a 767. There may also be some place to change, as many Asian carriers give out pj's in F and J, so there must be somewhere to put them on. The reason many of the most frequent travelers won't change into sweats is likely due to the fact that they pack as light as possible. People who know know not to check their luggage. As a result, one extra set of sweats probably won't fit.
post #45 of 53
I think Sysdoc has got the right idea. Comfort is king expecially when confronted with 16 plus hours in a flying tin box. I only differ with him 1)on when to get the sweats out (I put mine on before leaving for the airport, very ugly and I hope not to run into any SFer's boarding the plane) and 2) that I'm in the back in cattle class.
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