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Is Paul Stuart for my destiny?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
A fact I found, Paul Stuart was started by Ralph Ostrove.

Ostrove is a name I know.

Maybe Ralph, went to the beer garden too!
post #2 of 10
Published: September 3, 1981
Quote:
Ralph Ostrove, founder and chairman of the board of Paul Stuart Inc., the men's clothing store at Madison Avenue and 45th Street, died Tuesday at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, L.I., after a brief illness. He was 83 years old and lived in Flushing, Queens.

As the son of a leading retailer of men's clothing in New York, he made the Paul Stuart store one of the city's most popular outlets for men's clothing in what is regarded as the subdued classic or understated traditional style.

Mr. Ostrove was the son of Harry Ostrove, who founded the Broadstreet's chain of stores, which were discontinued several years ago. Ralph Ostrove, who eventually became president of Broadstreet's, left the company in 1937. In 1938 he founded Paul Stuart Inc., named for his son, Paul Stuart Ostrove, who is now vice president of the company.

In addition to his son, who lives in Roslyn, L.I., Mr. Ostrove is survived by his wife, Jean; a daughter, Barbara Grodd of Rye, N.Y.; a sister, Ruth Meltsner of Flushing, and five grandchildren.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
Published: September 3, 1981



Paul I found, is dead too.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...52C1A9629C8B63
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vaclav

But his store lives on.
post #5 of 10
But, Grodd it is, who run the store.
post #6 of 10
Michael, I believe, is running the store.


Published: November 24, 2004

Quote:
Paul Stuart Ostrove, the executive vice president who suavely presided over the selling floor of the Madison Avenue clothing store that was named for him, died on Nov. 21 at his home in Roslyn, N.Y. He was 73.
The cause was lymphoma, said Jack Freedman, marketing manager for Paul Stuart.


In 1938, Ralph, Paul's father, was searching for a name for the clothing store he was opening at Madison Avenue and 45th Street. He glanced at his 7-year-old son.

''My mother said, 'Why don't you call it Paul Stuart?''' Mr. Ostrove said in an interview with The New York Times in 1982. ''My father liked it, and that's what they named it. I don't think I had much to say about it.''

Paul Stuart would become known for high-quality, stylish, but seldom faddish clothing, predominantly men's attire even after a women's department opened in the 1970's. Mr. Ostrove liked to call the store's understated suits and furnishings ''investment clothing.''

The family's ownership of clothing stores went back to Paul Ostrove's grandfather Harry, who started a men's store called Broadstreet's around the time of World War I. By the 1920's, it had grown into a chain of three or four stores; it was sold in 1928, although Mr. Ostrove's father remained as president until 1937.

The next year, he opened his own store around the corner from Brooks Brothers. Paul Stuart became known as the poor man's Brooks Brothers, although the store has since become pricier than Brooks.

Mr. Ostrove began working in the store on Saturdays as a high school student, dusting boxes. After graduating from Colby College and serving in the Army, he began his full-time career with Paul Stuart in 1955 as a salesman of shirts and ties.

He rose to executive vice president.

Mr. Ostrove concentrated on merchandising for the men's department and endeared himself to the customers he saw as friends by his long-term memory for past purchases.

''You already own that,'' he would caution. ''I'm not going to sell you another one.''

In the early 1960's, the store expanded from 45th Street around the corner onto Madison Avenue and then opened selling space on the second floor.

Mr. Ostrove is survived by his wife, Estelle; his daughter Gail Kantor, of Manhattan; his sons, Michael, of Manhattan and David of California; his sister, Barbara Grodd, of Manhattan; and eight grandchildren.

Mr. Freedman said most customers had no idea of Mr. Ostrove's middle name, and, as a result, did not know they were shopping in his namesake. He certainly did not tell.

''It wasn't important to him,'' Mr. Freedman said. ''People were important to him.''
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
Michael, I believe, is running the store.


Published: November 24, 2004

I worked there one summer while Iw as in college and Clifford Grodd was the head man. Of course, that was over 20 years ago. Ouch.
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by aportnoy
I worked there one summer while Iw as in college and Clifford Grodd was the head man. Of course, that was over 20 years ago. Ouch.

Did you take advantage of the employee discount? How many pairs of EG did you buy? Did EG make their Stuart's Choice then?

Yup, Michael is the head honcho.

Quote:
Published: July 30, 2002


Buyers Are Down, but Numbers Are Up


On several tours last week of Midtown department stores, the scene was decidedly eerie, in some cases resembling a science-fiction movie in which aliens spirit all the locals to outer space. Had the stock market's 20 percent decline spooked all the customers?

At lunch hour on Thursday, the 12 sales people on the main floor of Paul Stuart yawned and leaned on counters as a single customer perused a case of ties. At Brooks Brothers, the street-level sales floor was like a meditation hall.

''I stopped into Barneys the other day to pick up a jacket a friend bought,'' said Barbara Lipper, a screenwriter. ''I got to the door, looked in and thought the store was closed.''

It is easy to read in this scene portents of doom. But, according to retailers, the ghost-town look can be misleading. The miles of empty aisles are mainly a business-as-usual sign of the summer doldrums, they say.

In late July, final markdowns of spring clothes have descended by thrilling percentages, and new fall merchandise is just arriving for the delectation of fashion's early birds.

Gauging the impact of the market declines and business scandals on the wallets -- and psyches -- of consumers is tricky.

Michael Ostrove, the president of the family-owned Paul Stuart, said, ''I won't lie and say it's been fantastic, but we had a very decent spring season, and our numbers are up.'' At the Madison Avenue store, Mr. Ostrove said, sales topped $20,000 one day last week, an increase over days during the same midsummer period last year. ''But it's July,'' Mr. Ostrove said. ''So, let's face it, expectations are low.''

At Brooks Brothers, sales are ''slightly behind our plan for this year,'' said Mark Shulman, the chief operating officer for the store's owner, Retail Brand Alliance. ''When you factor in the economic climate, then we're not surprised or panicked or even close to writing the fall season off.''

Although foot traffic may be down, said Kim Vernon, a corporate spokeswoman for Calvin Klein Inc., that fact had less to do with the market than with the reality that ''the entire designer and luxury-goods category experienced sales declines post-9/11.'' She said the figures to date ''are showing strong signs of turnaround, and July business is looking to finish ahead of plan.''

Adrianne Shapira, a retail analyst at Goldman Sachs, noted: ''Manhattan is tough. Tourism is dragging, the wealth effect is waning and the volatility of Wall Street weighs heavily on this market.''

But retailers who saw the downturn coming made adjustments. ''Inventory planning was very prudent, Ms. Shapira said. ''There may not be a lot of warm bodies in the stores, but stores aren't on the hook with a lot of merchandise.''
post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by von Rothbart
Did you take advantage of the employee discount? How many pairs of EG did you buy? Did EG make their Stuart's Choice then?

Yup, Michael is the head honcho.

I basically worked for free in that I turned my entire paycheck in merchandise. IIRC, the discount was 40% (maybe 50%) off retail. EG did supply Stuart's Choice at that time and I have about 8 pair that I amassed from that 2 month stay.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by aportnoy
But, Grodd it is, who run the store.

In the New York marathon?
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