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I am addicted to Redfin. - Page 3

post #31 of 112

The second one looks great.
There are a few old warehouses here in Brisbane (Australia) beside the river that have been converted into apartments, and most of them look fantastic - enormously wide wooden beams, very high ceilings, double-hung wooden windows and, of course, great brickwork.

Horrendously expensive, though.
post #32 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I love this question. Everyone with more money than none thinks that they are barely scraping by. That its not possible to live with less than they have. Some sort of shared capitalist psychosis.

You can live on anything. Or nothing. Money does not determine survival. Only luxury. I lead a pretty simple life. I go to work. I come home. Some days I go to the gym. Some days I watch a movie or two. Occasionally I'll go out to eat somewhere nice. I smoke. I drive around in a fairly new model car (which after this year I will own), I don't really buy anything. I have a couple pairs of jeans, a couple dozen t-shirts, a few sweatshirts, a couple decent jackets, a few pairs of sneakers... thats pretty much it. I have no savings, I buy clothes once a year.

You get sick and tired of not having "enough"... sure. I don't think that changes no matter how much money you have though. There's always something you convince yourself you "need". Whether its something as superficial as new clothes, or a luxury disguised as a "right" like having a family or a home. Nobody needs to have children, or live in the suburbs, or have a nice apartment, or drive an SUV, or eat at restaurants, or buy new clothes every couple of months, or any of it.


If you dont mind me asking, how much do your trips to Japan cost?
post #33 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
The second one looks great.
There are a few old warehouses here in Brisbane (Australia) beside the river that have been converted into apartments, and most of them look fantastic - enormously wide wooden beams, very high ceilings, double-hung wooden windows and, of course, great brickwork.

Horrendously expensive, though.

My sister lived in a loft before they got popular. It looked great. There was a slight echo to every noise, and it was always frigid cold. The bedroom was this tiny room that could barely hole her bed, and it had a heater on the ceiling.

The "loft apartments/condos" people are making these days, planned as residential areas from the start, are unbelievably lame.
post #34 of 112
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reggs View Post
If you dont mind me asking, how much do your trips to Japan cost?
Around $800-1200 or so including flight and hotel. But I haven't been since 07.
post #35 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I love this question. Everyone with more money than none thinks that they are barely scraping by. That its not possible to live with less than they have. Some sort of shared capitalist psychosis.

You can live on anything. Or nothing. Money does not determine survival. Only luxury. I lead a pretty simple life. I go to work. I come home. Some days I go to the gym. Some days I watch a movie or two. Occasionally I'll go out to eat somewhere nice. I smoke. I drive around in a fairly new model car (which after this year I will own), I don't really buy anything. I have a couple pairs of jeans, a couple dozen t-shirts, a few sweatshirts, a couple decent jackets, a few pairs of sneakers... thats pretty much it. I have no savings, I buy clothes once a year.

You get sick and tired of not having "enough"... sure. I don't think that changes no matter how much money you have though. There's always something you convince yourself you "need". Whether its something as superficial as new clothes, or a luxury disguised as a "right" like having a family or a home. Nobody needs to have children, or live in the suburbs, or have a nice apartment, or drive an SUV, or eat at restaurants, or buy new clothes every couple of months, or any of it.

I wish I could sig this.
post #36 of 112
Thread Starter 
Pretty awesome fixer-upper:

http://www.redfin.com/WA/Lake-Forest...155/home/93777

Not sure I'd want to pay taxes on that/heat that huge place though.

Maybe fix and flip.
post #37 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
Pretty awesome fixer-upper:

http://www.redfin.com/WA/Lake-Forest...155/home/93777

Not sure I'd want to pay taxes on that/heat that huge place though.

Maybe fix and flip.

Looks cool but would need major work I think.
post #38 of 112
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artisan Fan View Post
Looks cool but would need major work I think.
... maybe your idea of major work is different than mine, but I'd disagree. The home itself needs new cabinets/countertops, prob. bathroom remodel, updated light and plumbing fixtures, interior doors, and flooring. I don't see anything major that needs to be done. It looks pretty new. It's not like you'd have to strip the interior down to stud, deal with dry rot, replumb the whole house, or do major concrete work. It's all superficial stuff. A halfway decent fence w/some groundcover and a a cheap pond/flagstone/flowerbed would do wonders for the front lawn. Could (relatively) easily be a 3/4 million dollar home in a year.
post #39 of 112
Thread Starter 
First things first, the 500 tracklight spot cans have to GO.

I don't think I've ever seen so many of those in my life.
post #40 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I love this question. Everyone with more money than none thinks that they are barely scraping by. That its not possible to live with less than they have. Some sort of shared capitalist psychosis.

You can live on anything. Or nothing. Money does not determine survival. Only luxury. I lead a pretty simple life. I go to work. I come home. Some days I go to the gym. Some days I watch a movie or two. Occasionally I'll go out to eat somewhere nice. I smoke. I drive around in a fairly new model car (which after this year I will own), I don't really buy anything. I have a couple pairs of jeans, a couple dozen t-shirts, a few sweatshirts, a couple decent jackets, a few pairs of sneakers... thats pretty much it. I have no savings, I buy clothes once a year.

You get sick and tired of not having "enough"... sure. I don't think that changes no matter how much money you have though. There's always something you convince yourself you "need". Whether its something as superficial as new clothes, or a luxury disguised as a "right" like having a family or a home. Nobody needs to have children, or live in the suburbs, or have a nice apartment, or drive an SUV, or eat at restaurants, or buy new clothes every couple of months, or any of it.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is called hitting the nail on the head. Slim I feel you on all of this. Some people just have no clue.
post #41 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tokyo Slim View Post
I love this question. Everyone with more money than none thinks that they are barely scraping by. That its not possible to live with less than they have. Some sort of shared capitalist psychosis.

You can live on anything. Or nothing. Money does not determine survival. Only luxury. I lead a pretty simple life. I go to work. I come home. Some days I go to the gym. Some days I watch a movie or two. Occasionally I'll go out to eat somewhere nice. I smoke. I drive around in a fairly new model car (which after this year I will own), I don't really buy anything. I have a couple pairs of jeans, a couple dozen t-shirts, a few sweatshirts, a couple decent jackets, a few pairs of sneakers... thats pretty much it. I have no savings, I buy clothes once a year.

You get sick and tired of not having "enough"... sure. I don't think that changes no matter how much money you have though. There's always something you convince yourself you "need". Whether its something as superficial as new clothes, or a luxury disguised as a "right" like having a family or a home. Nobody needs to have children, or live in the suburbs, or have a nice apartment, or drive an SUV, or eat at restaurants, or buy new clothes every couple of months, or any of it.

This response gives me pause...

A very good pause. Thank you for posting it.
post #42 of 112
$2,000 a month may not be "big time," but there is probably a point in many people's lives that they were there (first job, right after college, just moved, etc.). Yeah, we all survived. The best (and most accurate) advice I ever got was from my first boss - "no matter how much you make, you usually find a way to spend it all and think you need more." I make more than both my parents combined in their best years and I struggle through it with cars I don't really need, extra clothes, and so forth. I bitch about money more than anyone I know. $2,000 in Seattle is tight, but I lived in London on less than a $1,000 a month for a good part of the year. You learn to walk, don't have a cell phone, drink one beer instead of two, wear your clothes a few more times before you wash, and go to matinee movies.
post #43 of 112
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benzito View Post
$2,000 a month may not be "big time," but there is probably a point in many people's lives that they were there (first job, right after college, just moved, etc.). Yeah, we all survived.

The best (and most accurate) advice I ever got was from my first boss - "no matter how much you make, you usually find a way to spend it all and think you need more." I make more than both my parents combined in their best years and I struggle through it with cars I don't really need, extra clothes, and so forth. I bitch about money more than anyone I know.

$2,000 in Seattle is tight, but I lived in London on less than a $1,000 a month for a good part of the year. You learn to walk, don't have a cell phone, drink one beer instead of two, wear your clothes a few more times before you wash, and go to matinee movies.

Been doing it for a long time. No end in sight. Thanks for the support though.
post #44 of 112
Are you sure you're not forgetting to add two or three zeros there?

I'm mean according to the CEsspool, you should be tipping your doorman 25k a month.

Just kidding though, my gf and I live the same way (i.e. far below our means). Simple life is a happier life.
post #45 of 112
I like www.realtor.com for MLS listings
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