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6 pack

post #1 of 124
Thread Starter 
What do you think would be the best way to get a 6 pack
right now im running 5 miles a day
100 crunchers
100 leg lifts
and 100 of these oblique sit ups
per day


Any tips, ways you got a 6 pack? feel free to post here
Trying to get a 6 pack by June 15th (going on vacation)
post #2 of 124
None of that. Abs are built in the kitchen. You can't "target" your abs. It's probably the biggest fitness myth there is. You need to cut your overall bodyfat.
post #3 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arethusa
None of that. Abs are built in the kitchen. You can't "target" your abs. It's probably the biggest fitness myth there is. You need to cut your overall bodyfat.
Well, more accurately all of that, plus a healthy diet. You might see your belly grow a bit before the fat all melts away, due to larger muscles being built under the fat.

Tom
post #4 of 124
Everyone has a six pack. Not that he can't do exercises to develop his muscles, but it's not necessary if all he wants is muscle definition, and doing the exercises he listed really won't do very much to develop them anyway.
post #5 of 124
It's a good start though. You'll need to get more towards 500 of each exercise. The benefits of a strong core are much more than just a six pack. Plus, chicks really dig the lower-ab lines that point to your groin that develop from doing leg lifts.

Tom
post #6 of 124
Thread Starter 
Heres what i would normally eat a day
Tell me if there would be any ways to fix it

Breakfast:
Cereal bar: South beach diet one
never really to hungry

Lunch:
turkey sandwhich on whole wheat bread
2 fruits/vegetable usually carrot sticks, bannana, orange, califlower
Low fat chewy garnola bar

Dinner:
Usually a main meal: fish/chicken/steak/pasta etc
Vegetable or 2 (not w/ the pasta unles you consider tomatoes) usually a potatoe/string beans/ asparagas/broccoli/califlower/corn etc...

Usually dont snack inbetween

Critique plz if you would
post #7 of 124
100 yd sprints, interval style a couple of times a week.

100...500...1000 of any ab exercise is quite inefficient. Do weighted exercises, sets of 15-20 reps max.
post #8 of 124
So just burn more calories (more running) and eat less, right?
post #9 of 124
Yes, burn more calories than consumed. Consume more of your day's calories in the early part of your day. The running you are doing is great. Swimming is great, too. Think cardio activities. However, all of this means nothing if the output is keeping your body in check, while toning or perhaps slightly building muscle, because perhaps your calorie intake increases. So, you need to be aware of what you are eating, when you are eating, how you are burning calories, and what your metabolism is like. Depending on your frame and where you store fat, you would be aiming for a body fat % between 4-8% to show developed abs. However, there is huge variation between persons in regards to how defined the abs will be shown. Unless you plan on burning lots of calories late in the day, perhaps avoid the carbs after mid-afternoon. Really, diet depends on your lifestyle and schedule. Needless to say, cut down or out the sugar and excess salt. Drink the minimum recommended amount of water/day. If you aren't used to this, you may notice some added weight in early weeks and the appearance of a larger belly. Many people live day-to-day in a dehydrated state, but the benefits of water (not gatorade, etc.) can't be denied. Guage your metabolism. It's not so much about weight, you know, but rather body fat. Every frame will have its benefits and challenges. You want to gain understanding of yours. Crunches, lifts, twists, and stretching all serve a purpose, and building up some muscles will increase calorie-burning. But one without the other gets you nowhere. Diet and exercise. Do not eat, unless you are hungry. It's not about denying yourself, though. It's about being sensible and balanced. Do not overeat. Do not undereat. Workout at different times in the day over the week. Mornings, sometimes, afternoons, others, etc. Burn more than you consume, again, but understand that if you reduce your caloric intake to <some level I cannot guess>, the body has a mechanism that will essentially slow down your consistent efforts. So, uh, don't be starving yourself! How many calories you need per day varies from person to person. What's the average recommended now, 2500? 2000? Find out and compare to what you consume now. Do not live by numbers. It's really about putting into practice the common sense ideas of a healthy diet and exercise in the context of your lifestyle and what you know or come to understand about your body's makeup. edit: Oh, eat sensible portions of varieties of foods per meal. Don't leave the table feeling "stuffed". Eating 3-5 times per day isn't bad, but if you're going with the 5x, I don't believe two of those occasions really count as meals, but rather "healthy snacks" (2 hard boiled eggs, for example). To me, 5 "meals" just seems to be a lot of food consumption. Thoughts?
post #10 of 124
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post #11 of 124
More important than excercise and eating are your genes. None of this will work if you don't have the genes for a six pack.
post #12 of 124
Nahhh...genetics is just an excuse. Practically everyone can achieve the "6-pack" if they stripe away body fat. The bigger problem is that most people will look anorexic, unless they first have built substantial muscle.
post #13 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by scnupe7
More important than excercise and eating is your genes. None of this will work if you don't have the genes for a six pack.

It is true that certain body types are naturally more geared towards muscle development than other body types. Metabolism is another unique factor. Those are either benefits or challenges and are just aspects of there being various body types. Not everyone can -naturally- pack on muscle and not everyone can -healthily- burn calories quickly.

Similarly, it may be true that not everyone can be "slim" (Note: I'm not very knowledgeable on the so-called "fat gene", but AFAIK, that is typically used to partially explain the prevalence of obesity, which is an extreme and, while it may not seem to be so, does not represent a "norm" or general mean).

Every individual has the potential to attain a healthy weight and body fat %. The differences between individuals' make-ups can be reflected in how a six-pack is developed and shown. No, not everyone can (or should) <reasonably> aim for the Brad Pitt or Usher abs, but everyone can aspire to their optimum, which <is> achievable and will be nothing to be ashamed of.
post #14 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by scnupe7
More important than excercise and eating are your genes. None of this will work if you don't have the genes for a six pack.

maybe not the be all end of all of getting a six pack, but i truly believe that genetics can make things easier or harder. one look at my brother and i is living proof of that.

-Jeff
post #15 of 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by freakseam
Depending on your frame and where you store fat, you would be aiming for a body fat % between 4-8% to show developed abs. However, there is huge variation between persons in regards to how defined the abs will be shown.
Freakseam, you give good advice and are clearly more knowledgeable than I am. I think this is pushing it though--I'm at 17% body fat with decent ab definition, aiming for 12%. 4% is bodybuilder form, in season. Jerry Rice was quoted as saying he kept his body fat around 12% because below that he didn't have the energy to practice and play.

I agree about the meals; when 5 meals are recommended 2 of them are protein shakes or similar.

Tom
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