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Eccentric combinations.

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Can one get away with wearing various items of clothing in rather odd combinations? The odd combinations I mean are not full of repulsive looking pieces like leg warmers, and etc. but something flattering but still exquisitly odd. Perhaps the new Ralph Lauren Purple Label ads in which the men wear velvet coats, and whatnot? I was thinking of the fashion journalist Anna Piaggi when the thought came up. So what are some suggestions, and comments for this notion?
post #2 of 17
As with everything, I think it depends on the occasion. It's easier to wear interesting stuff like that if you are at an event that is filled with artistic people- such as fashion shows and art openings. That's the reason I think Piaggi gets away with it. A lot of stuff like that wouldn't fly at work or at other more conservative functions. Also, some people just do it so much that it becomes their style trademark. If a person dresses in such a fashion often enough then sooner or later everyone gets use to it and then just goes " I wonder what ___ will be wearing." . But then you have to have a LOT of bizarre clothing pieces and be sure to coordinate them well (or not at all so it seems as if they are coordinated)or else you become "that guy with the weird (insert clothing item here)". Either that or you could just immitate the Etro adds As a personal note I love weird clothing and look at it more as art that is wearable than just something to cover my body, thus my inside-out Prada suit and Margiela Tux.
post #3 of 17
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Can one get away with wearing various items of clothing in rather odd combinations?
I think Renwick made some excellent points, but I think the real bottom line is, "if you have to ask..." Which is to say, if you're not sure the look is going to fly, then it almost certainly isn't. The key to carrying off a "look" is a coolly confident, "I don't give a @#$%," attitude. That, and the natural flair to back up the confidence. Granted, some of the outfits you wear may be collossal failures by many people's standards, but if you're concerned about that, you shouldn't have purchased the Carol Christian Poell salmon-pink kevlar jacket with the single side vent in the first place (to name the one item of my clothing that my wife would like most dearly to burn). At any rate, it's a really bad idea to wear it to the office on the day of your salary review.
post #4 of 17
In my experience, there should be a certain synthesis to your ensemble. I'd wear contrasting jacket, trousers, shirt, vest, tie, and pocket square, but not a t-shirt with a tie - that's just plain silly. Still, that's just my opinion - for people that develop an eccentricity or two, it's usually instinctive. If you're thinking, 'what can I wear to make myself look eccentric?' you may be on the wrong track. It's best to think, 'what do I enjoy wearing?' and if your combination of items comes off as eccentric, then so be it. You're wearing what you want. I've found I've been wearing more 'eccentric' combinations as my wardrobe has improved in terms of quality and fit. That's why, I think, you see so many movie stars of yesteryear (Fred Astaire, Cary Grant, Dean Martin, etc.) 'breaking the rules' on occasion (button-down shirt with DB suit: wing-collar shirt, tieless, with regular suit, ad infinitum) - if your wardrobe consists of nothing but high-quality garments, you can pull out a random selection of clothing, and it'll all be tied together by virtue of that quality. Oh, and for what it's worth, I find most of what Anna Piaggi wears pretty hideous. Sure, it's her 'style', but it's pretty self-conscious and 'out to shock'. I think anyone's definition of style should include some modicum of taste and a nod to aesthetics, not thinking 'How can I make people's eyes melt today?'
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you shouldn't have purchased the Carol Christian Poell salmon-pink kevlar jacket with the single side vent in the first place
Cool. Kevlar jacket. As in, DuPont kevlar? This is a new one for me. Isn't it... rather inflexible in the sleeves? Cheers, Nick.
post #5 of 17
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Cool. Kevlar jacket. As in, DuPont kevlar? This is a new one for me. Isn't it... rather inflexible in the sleeves?
I have never seen that particular piece, but Kevlar can be made into a flexible material quite easily by keeping it thin. When it is that thin it won't be bulletproof but will withstand a massive amount of wear- such as in motorcycle racing uniforms. As for that jacket, I'd like to see it. Why only one side vent? Is it just the deconstructionist thing (like my Margiela tux with buttons on one sleeve only) or some other reason?
post #6 of 17
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"if you have to ask..." Which is to say, if you're not sure the look is going to fly, then it almost certainly isn't. The key to carrying off a "look" is a coolly confident, "I don't give a @#$%," attitude. That, and the natural flair to back up the confidence.
Yes, definitely at that point attitude is everything.
post #7 of 17
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if your wardrobe consists of nothing but high-quality garments, you can pull out a random selection of clothing, and it'll all be tied together by virtue of that quality.
Only to an extent. I mean you probably shouldn't wear the brioni double breasted suit with the D&G spurred boots and the Gucci pseudo paisley print unless you are very confident in yourself- cause you will look very odd. Learning how to match stuff at least a little is a good idea. I'm still learning the fine art of matching and not looking silly.
post #8 of 17
post #9 of 17
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Cool. Kevlar jacket. As in, DuPont kevlar? This is a new one for me. Isn't it...rather inflexible in the sleeves?
I have never seen that particular piece, but Kevlar can be made into a flexible material quite easily by keeping it thin. When it is that thin it won't be bulletproof but will withstand a massive amount of wear"”such as in motorcycle racing uniforms. As for that jacket, I'd like to see it. Why only one side vent? Is it just the deconstructionist thing (like my Margiela tux with buttons on one sleeve only) or some other reason?
Actually, it's 60% nylon, 26% polypropylene, and 14% kevlar, so it's a tad stiff, but hardly inflexible. I'm fairly sure it's not bulletproof, but I'm not anxious to test it...although my wife is. As for the single side vent, yes, I'd say it's along the same lines as the Margiela tux. Other styling cues on this jacket include a single front button, narrow lapels, heavily padded shoulders, and one-button sleeves that then fold up into cuffs. All told, a rather odd piece of work. Probably destined for eBay, from whence it came.
post #10 of 17
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As for the single side vent, yes, I'd say it's along the same lines as the Margiela tux. Other styling cues on this jacket include a single front button, narrow lapels, heavily padded shoulders, and one-button sleeves that then fold up into cuffs. All told, a rather odd piece of work. Probably destined for eBay, from whence it came.
If you do decide to part with it let me know even though it probably won't fit me I still really want to see pics of it.
post #11 of 17
At first I though you were joking about this Kevlar piece. You must post a pic showing it. It seems too bizzare to even get an image of it in my mind.
post #12 of 17
To speak specifically about that RLPL velvet morning coat, It's wonderful. I haven't had much occasion to wear mine, but it's great for a nice restaurant or something vaguely hip like an indie art gallery opening. As for "eccentric" stuff in general, I think that depends a lot on age and location. For example, wearing a suit, white shirt, tie, and pocket square out could be construed as "eccentric" for a twenty year old. I have a simple, totally unintellectual rule. If I like it, then I'll buy it and wear it. Some "odd" things, like Paul Smith's flap-pocketed dinner jacket, the aforementioned RLPL coat, and much of Etro's outerwear, appeals to be greatly. Other things, like this season's Dior Homme tux with the satin stripe extending well past the notch in the lapel and hanging down, do not. Peace, JG
post #13 of 17
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At first I thought you were joking about this Kevlar piece. You must post a pic showing it. It seems too bizarre to even get an image of it in my mind.
I don't think the uniqueness of the material can possibly come across in a photograph, although the general look would come through well enough. Not sure when I'll get a chance to take a pic, but if I can manage it, I'll post one.
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I have a simple, totally unintellectual rule. If I like it, then I'll buy it and wear it.
Words to live by, for sure.
post #14 of 17
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Learning how to match stuff at least a little is a good idea. I'm still learning the fine art of matching and not looking silly.
True, but once you know all the rules, I think you can confidently break a few each time you step outside your door, if you're still looking good.
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I mean you probably shouldn't wear the brioni double breasted suit with the D&G spurred boots and the Gucci pseudo paisley print unless you are very confident in yourself- cause you will look very odd
If I had the cash, I'd be wearing that tomorrow   Or at least something very similar. Swap out the Gucci shirt for one of Richard James' paisley numbers, and perhaps round it off with a solid-color, polka-dotted, or striped tie. I'd change the boots, though - spurs seem kinda superfluous, even if I were riding a horse. Cheers, Nick.
post #15 of 17
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If I had the cash, I'd be wearing that tomorrow   Or at least something very similar. Swap out the Gucci shirt for one of Richard James' paisley numbers, and perhaps round it off with a solid-color, polka-dotted, or striped tie. I'd change the boots, though - spurs seem kinda superfluous, even if I were riding a horse. Cheers, Nick.
Hehe, well then it would be a completely differetn outfit- one which I would wear too.
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