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Degrees that can actually land you a decent job - Page 5

post #61 of 96
Quick question for those of you in investment banking/consulting: at first glance, which one sounds more impressive, "Computer Science" or "Computer Engineering" or "Computer Science and Engineering"?
post #62 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirSuturesALot View Post
Quick question for those of you in investment banking/consulting: at first glance, which one sounds more impressive, "Computer Science" or "Computer Engineering" or "Computer Science and Engineering"?

Engineering
post #63 of 96
I'm starting on my MA in international affairs this fall, and from the looks of it, I'm going into a life of cushy middle-class government jobs. Fair assessment?
post #64 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirSuturesALot View Post
Quick question for those of you in investment banking/consulting: at first glance, which one sounds more impressive, "Computer Science" or "Computer Engineering" or "Computer Science and Engineering"?

No difference, if you ask me, I would say CS from a more theoretical school would sound better than computer engineering.
post #65 of 96
What kind of degree would work in favor of someone (myself) who wants to do business + travelling abroad? International Relations? Working for the government?
post #66 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by surrender View Post
I'm starting on my MA in international affairs this fall, and from the looks of it, I'm going into a life of cushy middle-class government jobs. Fair assessment?

Probably eventually, but it can be a hassle in the short term. With an MA in IA, I assume you're looking at federal jobs, correct? These are a pain to get, and they take forever to go through the hiring process.

In my experience people vastly overestimate the ease with which one can get a government job. It's tough to get a decent entry-level job without experience, especially in IA. The market is awful right now because there are tons of people looking for a safe government job. You say you're just starting your degree, so you have time for some economic recovery, but that isn't going to happen particularly fast. There are A LOT of people with MAs looking for federal jobs, and the first cuts are for veteran's preference and experience. It's great if you have a master's degree, but if the guy next to you has a master's and two years with the Peace Corps (or a tour in Iraq) you almost might as well forget about that position.

Your area of concentration also matters. It helps to study what's chic right now. I have a friend with an MA in IA. He did a lot of work on non-prolif, and and he's screwed because no one cares about that stuff right now. We're too busy with other problems.

It also depends upon the quality/perceived quality of your school, but even this doesn't make it a lock. My MPA is from a top five program, and there are colleagues of mine who are unemployed after finishing their degrees. Granted, these aren't exactly the best in our program, but they still have an MPA.

Is there any particular reason you're getting an MA? Most MAs in IA are tracked toward academia, if you want to be a practitioner I would consider either an MIP or an MPA. Also, my above statements are predicated on the assumption that you're looking for federal work. If you want to work for state/local government, I would not get an MA in IA; I would be seriously considering an MPA.
post #67 of 96
A lot of people here have said learning a trade, which is a route I recommend. The OP mentioned considering the military. If you're serious about that (and make damn sure you are) you can learn a trade in the military, and not have to deal with working as an apprentice for dirt pay until you get your license. I learned plumbing and boilers in the Navy and landed a pretty good job when I got out, with no student loans to deal with. Now I am going back to school, but it's on the GI Bill's dime.
post #68 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljkrell View Post
You can skip college and get your hands dirty as a steamfitter, electrician or plumber. You will make more than the vast majority of recent college graduates with a 40 hour or less workweek.

So funny, I read the title of this thread and my first thought was "electrician." Every electrician I know makes a lot of money. I also know a guy with a roofing business who is the only person I've ever seen with an AmEx black card (he dropped it, he wasn't showing it off). So take that FWIW

Quote:
Originally Posted by surrender View Post
I'm starting on my MA in international affairs this fall, and from the looks of it, I'm going into a life of cushy middle-class government jobs. Fair assessment?

No, unless you want to go into the foreign service, and it will take you 3-4 years to get your foot in the door.

A better alternative is to work for an NGO or a multilateral (the UN, the IDB, etc.). You have to get an internship early on, and you'll probably need a masters. You will probably also have to move abroad, but that's a good thing. There are currently 4 or 5 NGO and UN employees living in my building (most working for the UN) and they love their work. The pay sucks, but job security and benefits are high, and with the UN once your foot is in the door you can get other NGO jobs easily.
post #69 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by pseudonym View Post
What kind of degree would work in favor of someone (myself) who wants to do business + travelling abroad?

International Relations? Working for the government?

Bump.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big A View Post
No, unless you want to go into the foreign service, and it will take you 3-4 years to get your foot in the door.

A better alternative is to work for an NGO or a multilateral (the UN, the IDB, etc.). You have to get an internship early on, and you'll probably need a masters. You will probably also have to move abroad, but that's a good thing. There are currently 4 or 5 NGO and UN employees living in my building (most working for the UN) and they love their work. The pay sucks, but job security and benefits are high, and with the UN once your foot is in the door you can get other NGO jobs easily.

What exactly does UN work consist of?
post #70 of 96
Thread Starter 
I talked to a few people over the week who were telling me Bio Technology is about to explode with jobs.. Im thinking of accounting my self, as it seems that there are always jobs for it all over the US. But everybody I've talked to said, it would be boring and I'd hate my job really quick. But that was always from people who weren't accountants. Mostly just thinking about, what can I major in that I can come out and get a decent job with.
post #71 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerDurden View Post
I talked to a few people over the week who were telling me Bio Technology is about to explode with jobs..

You might want to take a look at this article.

I have a few friends who graduated in the past year with their Masters in Bio Engineering from Ivy League schools. Still looking for jobs ...

You can only get a substantive research position (or go into BIO IP law) IF and ONLY IF you have a PhD in Bio- fields. Otherwise you'll be competing with undergrads for wet lab monkey jobs.
post #72 of 96
I don't know why people look so negatively upon humanities (some social sciences too) degrees, particularly when it comes to job prospects. I have never been worried sick about getting a job after college. But more than one person, upon hearing that I am a history major, has remarked, "Oh...I'm sure it will be tough to find a job with that!"
post #73 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post
I don't know why people look so negatively upon humanities (some social sciences too) degrees, particularly when it comes to job prospects. I have never been worried sick about getting a job after college. But more than one person, upon hearing that I am a history major, has remarked, "Oh...I'm sure it will be tough to find a job with that!"


Don't you think it might be a bit telling that you, as a 21 yr old student, think you'll have no problem whatsoever, but adults, with some real world experience, think that you might have a problem?
post #74 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwilkinson View Post
Don't you think it might be a bit telling that you, as a 21 yr old student, think you'll have no problem whatsoever, but adults, with some real world experience, think that you might have a problem?
Well, a lot of stupid people major in stuff like psychology or art history or English, so they probably influence a good deal of the popular thinking about humanities/social sciences degrees.
post #75 of 96
Quote:
Originally Posted by TylerDurden View Post
I talked to a few people over the week who were telling me Bio Technology is about to explode with jobs..

I have heard plastics is the thing of the future.
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