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lifetime of a tie

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
My ties seem to suffer more abuse in a two piece suit. I'm upgrading my wardrobe and buying better ties. In the process I've grown fond of several ties. Perhaps I'm over protective, but I'd like to know if a waistcoat will help prolong the life of a few of my favorites. Any opinions? Experiences?
post #2 of 15
I have only worn out one tie in my life, actualy the first "adult" tie I ever had. every other tie I have had either I still have or I gave away except for the one tie that was stained enough to give away, as well. I always wear a waistcoat.
post #3 of 15
I have no problem with waistcoats, but I don't know that I would wear one just to protect a tie. In the past 18 months I have overhauled my tie wardrobe as well, but one thing I've discovered is that there are always more high quality ties out there for a steal. My recommendation would be to buy more ties.
post #4 of 15
Quote:
...My recommendation would be to buy more ties.
Listen to him... He is wise beyond his years.
post #5 of 15
Countdemoney, I am curious, where are you seeing the wear and roughly how many times did you wear the ties before you saw the wear? Also what brands, and do you walk a lot with your ties rubbing against your suit? Example do you walk an hour to work for exercise? If you are seeing keepers fall off or ties just falling apart etc. that could be from the quality of the tie's construction and have nothing to do with your wear pattern. If you have worn your favorite red tie three times a week for the last 20 years and it is frayed at the tip it could just be par for the course. (just an exaggerated example)
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone for responding. Click to see the tie Mulberrywood, to answer your question, I've worn the tie three times, and if you look on the bottom left, you'll see where some of the thread in the white dot is fraying. There are other spots on the tie like this as well. One of my other wovens, an XMI, has a much smaller amount of fray, thus my concern. My thought was that a waistcoat could lessen, or hide, future damage, as most of the wear is occuring on the bottom part of the tie. As I want to get a three piece suit next time, I'm also looking for a way to rationalize it, beyond the fact that they look nice. I'm not quite up to following AlanC and FIH's advice. I like elegant, understated dress, but can sometimes find myself seduced by the color and texture of a piece. In the end, I regret the purchase, as it doesn't match with what I wear. Buying fewer means that I force myself to think first.
post #7 of 15
Countdemoney, I like the color and texture of your tie, and your photo is a good one so I can see the fraying. I would never be one to stand in the way of someones rationalization so go for your three piece suit. However, the fraying both should not be there and does happen from time to time. I have never watched the setup for a patterned tie created from the weave but you have got me wondering: Did they setup the tension on the yarn correctly? Did they use the correct yarn to start with? Maybe someone else could comment on this? We do not print or weave the patterns on our silks we use a mudmee "tie and dye" technique so this is a problem that I don't have much experience with. I assume that you really love the tie as you do not mention the option of returning it. If you are not in love with the tie return it. If you love the tie then you will have to perform light surgery and carefully cut the frayed ends (from time to time). A vest may slightly help but is not going to fix this problem.
post #8 of 15
I think that sort of fraying is somewhat inevitable with that type of tie, although if it happens after 3 wearings, there may be some bad luck involved. Some ties have loose weavings, where you can actually see the individual threads in the tie when looked at closely. That particular spot, being on the edge, probably takes more abrasions than the front of the tie, which led to the unfortunate pulling. I guess for that particular spot, a high button stance or a waistcoat will certainly help, although I think that may be slightly drastic. It's something you can live with by cutting out some of the fraying parts and hope that the spot isn't attacked again; by the looks of it, doing that won't expose the sport underneath the dot.
post #9 of 15
You need to have 50 ties at least if you dont want to use them. Just cut the threads or put them back in the fabric.
post #10 of 15
Anybody else Scotchguard their ties?
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I assume that you really love the tie as you do not mention the option of returning it. If you are not in love with the tie return it.
It's something of a memento. I bought the tie when shopping with a friend. Said friend and I are several thousand miles apart, and the store is by them. Perhaps I've created my excuse to visit again. I thought that it might be bad luck as well, but I don't have as much experience with the wovens.
Quote:
You need to have 50 ties at least if you dont want to use them.
I agree, and I'm getting there. The question is, how often will I need to replace each of the 50? Part of my goal in dressing better is to prove that it is not that much more expensive to dress well as to dress average. If you run the numbers (my professional titles have been things like "budget manager") I have a higher upfront cost with quality clothing, but it should even out over time. To give one example, when I moved from cotton dockers to wool trousers, I saved about $60-$80 a month in laundry service as I no longer need my pants pressed every day. That's real money, especially when you extend it out over the lifetime of the pants. Also, assuming proper care, those trousers will last far longer, which also equals a much lower cost of ownership. After my success with trousers and shirts, I've moved on to suitings. With the fraying of my tie, it caused me to ask if there is a value proposition to the waistcoat. And here I am.
post #12 of 15
Countdemoney, I smiled when I read your last post, as I used to be a tax accountant and I am still quite fond of my HP calculator. I think that you will find more savings with suits. Although a good tie with the keeper sewn into the tie should last a very long time- years -with little or no problems (there are always exceptions to the rule)
post #13 of 15
if you Scotchgaurd a tie be sure to test it on the back first in an inconspicuous spot. Some very fine silks can be ruined because they use natural dyes that will run a bit if soaked. Be nice to your ties, they did not do anything bad to you and yet people spill wine on them, drop ashes on them and wipe their greasy fingers on them. I think we need congressional hearings on the mistreatment of the poor, downtrodden neckwear in our country.
post #14 of 15
Richard James ties are the worst in this regard as they have individual strands of silk that can become frayed, especially where the borders of the inverted V-section of the tie rubs against the belt. Cannot do much - only have a nice collection where you wear the tie intermittently.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Richard James ties are the worst in this regard as they have individual strands of silk that can become frayed, especially where the borders of the inverted V-section of the tie rubs against the belt. Cannot do much - only have a nice collection where you wear the tie intermittently.
Bah. Charvet is just as bad or worse. I'm sure Duchamp is similar.
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