or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › WW Chan
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

WW Chan - Page 2

post #16 of 26
From what Chan told me, I'll probably be getting my garments around June 30 or July 1, in other words, after a wait of 101 days since I ordered on March 20. What were the the waiting periods like three years ago? I kind of get the sense that those of us on the West Coast get the shaft as far as waiting goes. Some people on the East Coast, who placed their orders a scant 8 or 10 days before we placed ours, have gotten their March orders a month or so ago. I'll be eager to get my garments. I have probably generalized too much about Chan on this forum on the strength of single suit, which was extremely satisfactory if not absolute perfection.
post #17 of 26
I used to get my suits in 6 to 8 weeks. It seems like another week gets added to the timeline every year.
post #18 of 26
Chan told me that orders on US trips have to proceed as they are taken. That means that those who are visited last will get their suits last. But if you get your measurements down -- and they WILL tweak your paper pattern via email if you request it -- you can get a suit in less than a month if you order during the down time. So, if you are considering getting multiple suits, I'd suggest picking out several fabrics (maybe even taking picks of them) when you see Chan on their tour. They are pretty good about letting you lock in for a short time the special price if you'd like to go with one of their special fabrics (like the LP 120s on this trip).
post #19 of 26
Anybody have an idea of what percentage of Chan's business comes from their U.S. tours, as compared to "walk ins" at their shops in Kowloon and Shanghai? I was a little surprised that they have "down time." Indeed, I think Mr. Chu will be hitting the States again within days of the shipment of the last of their orders from the March tour.
post #20 of 26
I guess by "downtime" I meant the period in which there is neither a backlog of US orders and CHan is neither travelling in the U.S. For example, I asked how long it would take to turn around a shirt ordered online right now. They said 1 month. I asked how long it would take if I ordered during the NYC visit. They said 2 months. It's probably more a matter of standing in line, so to speak. In any particular year, their walk in business is probably at least 3 or 4 times what they do in the US. However, that walk in business is spread out of 365 days, while the US orders come in over a cumulative period of about 30 probably.
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
retronotmetro, thanks for the helpful post. I actually have a few shirts made by David's (simpilar pricepoint to AC, at the Mandarin Oriental) and was thinking of wearing these during my fitting. But I may get another shirt from Chan, particularly since I feel that the David's shirts have armholes that are a little too big. Does this sleeve length bias extend (excuse me) to to their shirts? Yeah I think the best way for me to settle the pleats issue is to just go try some pants on. Thanks.
post #22 of 26
In my experience, they cut their sleeves just a dab shorter than I'd prefer.
post #23 of 26
Quote:
It's probably more a matter of standing in line, so to speak. In any particular year, their walk in business is probably at least 3 or 4 times what they do in the US.
Just an aside, I think for 95% of Hong Kong residents, Burlington Arcade just doesn't ring a bell in their mind. I walk-in one time and Chan's staff immediately ask if I were from overseas.
post #24 of 26
Given Johnny's comments, I guess you just need to be firm with them about what is acceptable regarding sleeve length. I had an early order where the shirt sleeves were a touch long and the coat sleeves were a touch short, which made for an interesting combination.
post #25 of 26
Let me clarify -- the sleeves on my order came down to the ideal spot (the base of the thumb bone where the hand meets the wrist), but there wasn't much excess fabric, which results in the sleeve receding just a bit if you move your arm a lot. I like to have a bit of excess sleeve (1/2" or so). In other words, the sleeves are too long if the cuff is unbuttoned, but is proper length when the (appropriately sized) cuffs are buttoned.
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Let me clarify -- the sleeves on my order came down to the ideal spot (the base of the thumb bone where the hand meets the wrist), but there wasn't much excess fabric, which results in the sleeve receding just a bit if you move your arm a lot.  I like to have a bit of excess sleeve (1/2" or so).  In other words, the sleeves are too long if the cuff is unbuttoned, but is proper length when the (appropriately sized) cuffs are buttoned.
Understood. Sounds like you may prefer a little more slack above the buttoned shirt cuff than I do. I agree that "appropriately sized" cuffs are pretty important and often overlooked--if you get the cuff size right you can have a lot of slack above the wrist without the sleeve riding down onto your palm.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › WW Chan