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Different countries = different rules?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have seen some rules in the marble of French sites that were different from those in the marble of the style forum. Is this due to idiosyncrasies of the authors of the said sites or are there different rules in different countries? Obviously habits may be different but rules? Can the boldly striped shirt of an Englishman be unacceptable elsewhere? Can a pocket square seem ridiculous in some places? etc. Mathieu
post #2 of 15
Rules can be different in different places. As an example wearing short pants other than at the beach is not acceptable in Thailand. When I visit my family in the south of France they insist that my clothes be ironed when we go out, even though it is the countryside. Yet when I visit my family in Arizona ironing is not that important.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Rules can be different in different places. As an example wearing short pants other than at the beach is not acceptable in Thailand. When I visit my family in the south of France they insist that my clothes be ironed when we go out, even though it is the countryside. Yet when I visit my family in Arizona ironing is not that important.
Shorts are very much discouraged throughout Latin America as well.
post #4 of 15
After reading about all these restrictions, I sure am glad I live in California.
post #5 of 15
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After reading about all these restrictions, I sure am glad I live in California.  
I'm with you. Right now, it's humid, sunny, and hot (around 90 F) where I live (North Dakota, USA). I'm not standing in the sun in long pants...heavy sweat stains and lightheadedness just aren't worth it. As for the original question: you don't even have to cross international borders to find different rules. As some have already noted on this board and AAAC, here in the American Midwest, many people (especially in their 40's and older) consider wingtips to be the dressiest style of shoes for business wear. In other places like the East Coast, it's cap toes.
post #6 of 15
In Europe, every country has something diferent...our history is diferent so our rules are too.
post #7 of 15
Quote:
In Europe, every country has something diferent...our history is diferent so our rules are too.
I agree, over here it is perfectly accepteble to wear Looney Tunes ties and socks.
post #8 of 15
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Can a pocket square seem ridiculous in some places? etc. Mathieu
Yes, in a desert .
post #9 of 15
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Yes, in a desert .
Like Algiers?
post #10 of 15
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Quote:
(Michael66 @ June 22 2005,23:27) In Europe, every country has something diferent...our history is diferent so our rules are too.
I agree, over here it is perfectly accepteble to wear Looney Tunes ties and socks.
Looney tunes ties and socks are even considered stylish in Holland. So are five-button suits.
post #11 of 15
the rule in Vietnam: "the whiter the socks, the richer the man"
post #12 of 15
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Looney tunes ties and socks are even considered stylish in Holland. So are five-button suits.
Are these worn Stacy Adams gangster style with all the buttons buttoned?
post #13 of 15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roy,June 22 2005,14:27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael66,June 22 2005,23:27
In Europe, every country has something diferent...our history is diferent so our rules are too.
I agree, over here it is perfectly accepteble to wear Looney Tunes ties and socks.
Looney tunes ties and socks are even considered stylish in Holland. So are five-button suits.
The only five buttons suits I have seen here were pink and were clearly meant as 'funny suits' not to be taken seriously. Apart from those on TV I have never seen other five button suits here. But I get laughed at because my socks (plain cotton or when it's winter wool) are actually long enough to cover up any bare leg you might see when you sit down or cross your legs One of the 'rules' in Dutch banking is that the thicker and more prominent the stripe on a suit, the higher you are in the hierarchy. As a junior you shouldn't wear a chalkstripe but a very fin pin/needlestripe suit for instance. I don't know how 'international' this rule is. Who is Stacy Adams btw?
post #14 of 15
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Who is Stacy Adams btw?
Stacy Adams is a brand very popular with rap stars. Example: I can't tell if that's 6 or 7 buttons. The model's hands are in the way.
post #15 of 15
Damn, those suits look pretty damn bad.
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