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US Grand Prix

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Any F-1 fans see this cluster? Six cars take the green flag? Probably the last F-1 race we'll see in Indy. http://www.indystar.com/apps....055
post #2 of 9
What would have been wrong with the following compromise: A chicane would be constructed in turn 13. All cars would participate in the race, but only Bridgestone-shod cars would have been eligible for world championship points. This would have ensured a spectacle for the fans while still preserving the integrity of the championship--since, after all, Michelin got the tires dead wrong and did not even bother to bring a suitable backup; and since, moreover, the Bridgestone runners should not have been penalized for bringing the correct tire.
post #3 of 9
I still can't believe there wasn't any rioting. Just imagine if it was Nascar what would have happened. Many people dropped the ball: Michelin, Bernie Ecclestone, Max Moseley, Ferrari, and Schumacher. Anyone catch him driving Rubens onto the grass after pitting? The FIA's rule on tire changing is completely unsafe to begin with. Teams have to use the same tires for qualifying and the race. Coulthard got it dead right when he said "I've not experienced anything like this in my career before. Frankly, I'm embarrassed..." The fact the FIA, race teams, Bernie, and Max couldn't figure out some way to race with all involved just goes to show their stupidity by effectively alienating the last untapped F1 market in the world. BTW, outrage in this matter isn't only localized in the US. This incident reverberated around the world and will have an impact in F1 support at other venues in the future. Sadly, this will most likely be the last USGP at Indy.
post #4 of 9
I have to admit that I got the tv on late for this race. I saw Schumi and Barricello in the front and I thought, "oh shit, here we go again." Then I saw those next two and couldn't believe my eyes. From everything I've read, I think this is totally FIA's fault. It was clear there was a problem with the Michelin tires. Let them bring in new ones, put in the chicane, whatever. And as many people have said, just don't award points to the Michelin cars. What a disaster this was. The tire rule is proving to be a horrible decision. Btw, Jean Todt says that Ferrari had no say in the chicane; that they hadn't even heard the proposal. He did, however, go on to say that they probably would have voted against it. bob
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Many people dropped the ball: Michelin, Bernie Ecclestone, Max Moseley, Ferrari, and Schumacher. Anyone catch him driving Rubens onto the grass after pitting?
I understand the frustration by many fans over Schumacher's tactics, however this particular manuever was nothing like Adelaide '94. Nor was it even on the same level as his starts when he knifes across the track. Due to the pit configuration at Indy, the car exits on the inside line of the track. A car on the inside line for that corner is going to get through the corner before any car on the outside line. Therefore, a car exiting the pits has a slight advantage over a car coming down the straight, all other things being equal. MS had the inside line and never deviated from that. Rubens, in an attempt to make an impossible pass, overshot his braking point and went on to the grass. Thus the only reason the Ferrari's got so close to each other was because of Ruben's late braking, not because of anything MS did. If the pit exit lane was configured such that the car came out on the outside line of the track, then of course Rubens would have retained the lead through turn 1. But that's motor racing.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
What would have been wrong with the following compromise: A chicane would be constructed in turn 13. All cars would participate in the race, but only Bridgestone-shod cars would have been eligible for world championship points. This would have ensured a spectacle for the fans while still preserving the integrity of the championship--since, after all, Michelin got the tires dead wrong and did not even bother to bring a suitable backup; and since, moreover, the Bridgestone runners should not have been penalized for bringing the correct tire.
It's such an obvious solution. Makes you wonder why it wasn't adopted.
post #7 of 9
Quote:
I still can't believe there wasn't any rioting.  Just imagine if it was Nascar what would have happened.
They made that exact point on the local news, asking what the reaction would have been at nearby Talladega if that had happened. *shudder*
post #8 of 9
According to http://www.foxsportsworld.com the first lawsuit has been filed and the seven teams are facing charges of "bringing the sport into disrespute". Should be interesting. bob
post #9 of 9
i don't see it as being a big deal. the rules were followed and the crowd still got to see 6 of the best drivers in the world compete for the US grand prize. remember that sports were a competition before they were an entertainment for the masses. sports existed long before there were audiences to watch them. if i were a bridgestone driver i would not want  the race changed for the michelin guys. i chose a tire company and mine did a better job. the michelin guys shouldn't be on the track if they need a handicap to be there. also, in sports, things happen. sometimes your favorite athlete gets injured or arrested right before the game you bought first row tickets for 2 months before. this does not entitle you to a refund.
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