or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Raffaele Caruso
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Raffaele Caruso - Page 2

post #16 of 112
^^ Your suits are the only reason I am selling my perfectly acceptable Corneliani suit to get a Caruso one from ehaberdasher. The RLBL stuff has never impressed me ...
post #17 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
^^ Your suits are the only reason I am selling my perfectly acceptable Corneliani suit to get a Caruso one from ehaberdasher.

I have a similar gray Corneliani suit (in S120) that I keep for 'official occassions' (which I fortunately seldomly have). Apart from some details (in the Parma line of Caruso) the quality (fabrics, finishing) of the two brands is comparable, in my experience (4 Caruso suits, 1 Corneliani suit and a few jackets).
post #18 of 112
^^ Surprised you say that, I though Caruso was better. Maybe it just gets more love on SF than Corneliani.

Could you tell in what is Parma line different from Corneliani as you have stated.
post #19 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post
I exchanged a few emails with a guy that works at Sid Mashburn about Caruso recently. He told me to just mail them my best fitting coat and they would copy it for the Caruso MTM program. I'm tempted to do it. The Caruso stuff I've seen on here looks killer.
Sid Mashburn is a good store. I would consider this.
post #20 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
^^ Surprised you say that, I though Caruso was better. Maybe it just gets more love on SF than Corneliani.

Could you tell in what is Parma line different from Corneliani as you have stated.

I think the inner construction is the same (machine full-canvas). I don't know all the aspects of the Parma line—"working sleeves" and some handwork, I think.
Maybe Corneliani gets less love because some models are 'roomier' and perhaps more constructed (shoulders) than most Caruso's.
post #21 of 112
how much is this program?

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Louche View Post
I exchanged a few emails with a guy that works at Sid Mashburn about Caruso recently. He told me to just mail them my best fitting coat and they would copy it for the Caruso MTM program. I'm tempted to do it. The Caruso stuff I've seen on here looks killer.
post #22 of 112
Any idea who sells Caruso in Munich, Germany or Innsbruck, Austria.
post #23 of 112
AJ, use http://www.thelabelfinder.com/shopse.../28043/2867714

One store in Munich that sells Caruso. Just type in Label (Caruso) and City and there you go. Generally Caruso is pretty well represented in Germany too, like in the Netherlands. For example, I have 3 stores in the city that sell Caruso and about 7 within a 30-40 minute drive.
post #24 of 112
^^ Thanks
post #25 of 112
after all the nickel-and-diming upcharges pushed the made to measure sportcoat price far above the off the rack SUITS carried by NM (the suits all had the details I wanted, actually), I decided to go with the Zegna. I added a ticket pocket for no extra charge, and honestly the zegna milano was a far better fit/ shape/ cut for me right off the rack, as well.

the carusos i tried on (NM models, anyways) didn't exactly "wow" anyone on my frame for some reason.


Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
Was a Caruso MTM SC working out to be more expensive than a Zegna MTM Sc with the options you wanted ?
post #26 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Foxx View Post
after all the nickel-and-diming upcharges pushed the made to measure sportcoat price far above the off the rack SUITS carried by NM (the suits all had the details I wanted, actually), I decided to go with the Zegna. I added a ticket pocket for no extra charge, and honestly the zegna milano was a far better fit/ shape/ cut for me right off the rack, as well.

the carusos i tried on (NM models, anyways) didn't exactly "wow" anyone on my frame for some reason.

What exactly do they nickel and dime for? Can you give examples of some of these up-charges?
post #27 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by aj_del View Post
^^ Surprised you say that, I though Caruso was better. Maybe it just gets more love on SF than Corneliani.

Could you tell in what is Parma line different from Corneliani as you have stated.

My Adriano & Sons Caruso has a little more handwork than my Corneliani, but I can't say it's a real step above in quality. Overall I think it's pretty comparable to Corneliani and Zegna. I think it gets a lot of love because it's a well-made garment, often available on discount under many private labels, and is less well-known. (The downside to its many labels is that sizing is all over the place.)
post #28 of 112
I am considering a Raffaele Caruso Sartorio Parma suit (http://store.ehaberdasher.com/Detail.bok?no=4334) and details measurements are provided. So hopefully that wont be a problem. Just sold my Corneliani suit on B &S. One major reasoning for shifting from Corneliani to Caruso was the patch pockets and flat front trousers on the Caruso rather than flap pockets and single pleat on the Corneliani. Other was my mistaken assumption that a Caruso is superior construction wise to a Corneliani .... We will see how it goes.
post #29 of 112
What are the different lines of Caruso and do the items they make for other brands differ in terms of quality?
post #30 of 112
Robb Report
November 11, 2009

Caruso Unveils Signature Neapolitan-Style Suits


When Werner Baldessarini launched his upscale signature clothing label in 1993, the longtime creative director and one-time chief executive of Hugo Boss went to Italian suit maker Alberto Caruso to help produce the collection. Back then Caruso, whose factory is located in an industrial area just outside of picturesque Parma, Italy, was using machines in place of manpower to create its low-cost Neapolitan-inspired suits (a nod to the Caruso family’s Naples origins). “It was Mr. Baldessarini that taught me to find the quality and underline it,” says Caruso who, with Baldessarini’s help, completely retooled his factory in the mid-1990s with high-tech computers that could streamline pattern making and production. He also built a new factory adjacent to the one he already had and hired master tailors capable of adding the finishing details--canvas inner linings, hand-sewn button holes, shirt set-in sleeves--considered hallmarks of high-end suit making.

Although Baldessarini was the first to capitalize on Caruso’s technically superior construction capabilities, during the past decade additional luxury brands such as Lanvin, Givenchy, Christian Dior, and, most recently, Ralph Lauren Black and Purple labels, have all subsequently followed suit. Starting this winter Caruso, in partnership with Umberto Angeloni, the former Brioni chief executive who took a 35 percent stake in the company last year, launched its signature label, known as Caruso, in the United States. Angeloni insists the softly constructed suits and sport coats feature the distinctive natural shoulder, high armhole, and raised button stance of bespoke Italian clothing but at a price ($1,500 to $1,900) more in line with today’s economy. The suits were launched this fall through select Neiman Marcus stores, as well as better specialty retailers such as Denver’s Lawrence Covell and Chicago’s Morris & Son. (917.355.0386)

—William Kissel
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Raffaele Caruso