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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, questions, porn) - Page 131

post #1951 of 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

wut? I just checked Specialized, Giant, and Orbea sites. All have bikes at full MSRP with carbon and 105 in the $1500-2K range, if not a tad above $2K. And note that's retail, which is rarely paid. Giant even has a carbon + 105 + disc model for $2100 full MSRP.

Oh, thought we were just comparing between Synapse models.
post #1952 of 2048
give a look at Orbea Avant. My college roommate, who actually raced pro for a while (and who was the Canadian time trial champion for a time) raced Cervelo for the TT's but an Orbea Orca for the races. Twice, and on separate frames, he ended up with a crack or a problem, and they replaced it for free both times (note: he rode the bikes really hard and was a tall guy. Both frames must have had thousands of miles, and I fully assumed the problems were his fault though not crashes).

If it wouldn't be a dumb/useless decision for me, I'd totally buy an M20. Frames are disc compatible too.
post #1953 of 2048
Do they make an endurance/sportage frame? Why I'm focused on the Synapse to try out is that it's a highly rated endurance frame. I'm looking for a more upright position this time around.

Carbon has advanced so a big guy can stand up and not flex the bottom bracket badly? I've been out of this for 20 years so bear with me.
post #1954 of 2048
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/orbea-avant-m30-complete-bike

old model, Ultegra parts, but always good write-ups there, and same frame (and frame geometry).


weight probably shouldn't be much of an issue, carbon is super stiff and yet super light. You might see some limits on ultra high performance frames (meant for the weenies on the mountains) and on high performance wheels, but that's about it.
post #1955 of 2048
Quote:
The Avant M30 Disc features an Avant Carbon OMP Monocoque Carbon disc frame with internal cable routing, electric shifting capabilities, and 135mm to 130mm convertible rear spacing.

Electric shifting?
post #1956 of 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post


Electric shifting?

 

Yeah Dura ace Di-2 is electric. Ultegra has electronic shifting as well. It's supposed to be amazing, but I'm okay not paying what I paid for my motorcycle for a bicycle.

post #1957 of 2048
One of my mates who has Ultegra electric still dropped his chain mid ride and bent it completely out of shape to the point he had to get his wife to come and pick him up. I said I thought the electronic stuff was supposed to be precision shifting? I guess for me I like the idea of adjusting the derailleur's with a turn of a screw rather than relying on the electronic system.
post #1958 of 2048

As a bicycle store co-owner, I would argue that the big advantage of disc brake equipped road bikes is not so much the superior braking discs (especially hydraulics) offer, as that may be overkill for most riders, but rather the versatility that being able to run wider tires than a non-disc brake bike can offers to the average rider who rides on a variety of road surfaces. 700x28 tires are pretty much the max for most non-disc bikes, and even that is iffy in many forks. With discs you can easily run 32's and in many frame and forks up to 37's. Wider tires offer more comfort and stability, and open up more cycling options - gravel roads, dirt paths, etc. With the appropriate tires your disc brake road bike will allow you to dabble in cyclocross, or cyclocross type riding conditions. We sold an Argon 18 Krypton X-Road to a customer last year who fitted it with 700x32 Cross Kings and used it for the Paris to Ancaster race/ride, ~70km. of rail trail, paved roads, gravel roads, single track, farmers fields, and mud. 

Hydraulic road disc brakes are great, but you are somewhat limited in shifter/brake setups and to some extent wheel choices. On my titanium disc brake road bike, which also serves as my 'dabbling in cyclocross' bike, I am running a Campy Athena levers/Hope V2/Hope hydraulic calipers set-up, which is probably a bit outside the norm. Wheels are Reynolds Attack disc carbon. Gearing is super compact (52-36).

If you are looking to own only one road bike, and racing isn't your focus, you really can't go wrong by choosing a disc equipped bike in the frame material you prefer or can afford, in the geometry that suits your riding style, with super compact gearing (52-36, or similar) and an 11-28 or so cassette. You'll have a pretty damn versatile bike.

post #1959 of 2048
Thanks for that post and welcome aboard.

Tire width was on my mind as I can see needing to do a little hard packed trail from time to time between paved connections. Comfort is also important.
post #1960 of 2048
If you care about comfort, DO NOT get an aluminum frame.

Modern aluminum with a good carbon or steel fork takes out a lot vibrations, but they are still way behind carbon and steel in the overall comfort department. People today buy aluminum bikes for crits where they are going to be racing for 45 minutes at full power and don't care about comfort. People used to buy them because a few decades ago, they were light weight and carbon was bendy...but carbon is stiff today.

Carbon and steel are going to provide the most comfortable rides. Titanium is nice too, although it is $$$ and can be tough to spec out right for heavier dudes.

As long as you can run 28s, I wouldn't be too worried about needing bigger tires. If you've already got an MTB, then you don't really need to be able to throw some 32mm CX knobbies on your road bike.
post #1961 of 2048
yeah, I was riding my dad's old Bianchi Vigorelli (steel frame) and it's surprisingly comfortable. On a true road bike I couldn't see myself having any reason to make the switch from even old carbon, but as a city bike with all the basic components, it'd be great.



question about tire width - I've always had super thin tires, just habit, but it is worth considering going wider for the Brooklyn roads? Currently have 23s, is it worth thinking about a 25-28? No gravel or anything, just the occasional crap road and crap weather.
post #1962 of 2048
Yup, back when I was riding, Ti was not for heavier guys nor was carbon. My Trek aluminum back then would make you pee blood from a century of bad roads but damn was it stiff. Nice to see carbon has developed the way it has. I was looking at the aluminum Synapse as it apparently has some "suspension" that makes it more comfy. The Synapse carbon 105 (sans disc) is about $800 more than the aluminum 105 disc and carbon 105 disc is about 1.1k more. I'm zeroing in on the Synapse at the moment has it's won so many "best of" awards over the last couple of years but will broaden my search over the summer as it gets close to an actual buy/no buy situation.

If I could get a good carbon with 105 groupset I'd be happy. I'd prefer not to go Trek just because that was my last real road bike that I'd put 6k a year on. Just want a different brand if possible for some reason. Gomey's rec last night was interesting.

Gome, to tires: if it's just road crap do they still make those "armadillo" tires? I had them as Michigan roads were horrible.
post #1963 of 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Yup, back when I was riding, Ti was not for heavier guys nor was carbon. My Trek aluminum back then would make you pee blood from a century of bad roads but damn was it stiff. Nice to see carbon has developed the way it has. I was looking at the aluminum Synapse as it apparently has some "suspension" that makes it more comfy. The Synapse carbon 105 (sans disc) is about $800 more than the aluminum 105 disc and carbon 105 disc is about 1.1k more. I'm zeroing in on the Synapse at the moment has it's won so many "best of" awards over the last couple of years but will broaden my search over the summer as it gets close to an actual buy/no buy situation.

If I could get a good carbon with 105 groupset I'd be happy. I'd prefer not to go Trek just because that was my last real road bike that I'd put 6k a year on. Just want a different brand if possible for some reason. Gomey's rec last night was interesting.

Gome, to tires: if it's just road crap do they still make those "armadillo" tires? I had them as Michigan roads were horrible.

I'd really agree on that. Carbon has come a long way. When I was growing up I had a Trek 800 as a first decent bike and then a 4700. Obviously, both being mountain bikes.

I have a Madone 2.1 now, the setup is mostly 105 with some Ultegra bits. It's essentially Al with the exception of the fork. It's not nearly as comfortable as my friends CF Cervelos or Scotts, but it also cost about a third.

Regarding tires, I'd just find a decent local bike shop or go on Nashbar or the like for wheel/tire combo based on reviews.
post #1964 of 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

If I could get a good carbon with 105 groupset I'd be happy.

wife's bike has the latest 105 group set, and I have little doubt that it's an improvement over my decade old Ultegra set. Really impressed first time I saw it.
post #1965 of 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

yeah, I was riding my dad's old Bianchi Vigorelli (steel frame) and it's surprisingly comfortable. On a true road bike I couldn't see myself having any reason to make the switch from even old carbon, but as a city bike with all the basic components, it'd be great.



question about tire width - I've always had super thin tires, just habit, but it is worth considering going wider for the Brooklyn roads? Currently have 23s, is it worth thinking about a 25-28? No gravel or anything, just the occasional crap road and crap weather.


get the Continental GP4000 in 25c. they actually are 27mm wide. very comfortable and still racy/light (only 20g heavier compared to 23c). Even the Conti 23c 4000 measure in at 24-25c.

all the new tires are wider than the old school stuff. old school tires were freaking thin as hell (was the opposite and were often thinner). the new research shows the wider the tire the faster you go (power transfer increased).


Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Yup, back when I was riding, Ti was not for heavier guys nor was carbon. My Trek aluminum back then would make you pee blood from a century of bad roads but damn was it stiff. Nice to see carbon has developed the way it has. I was looking at the aluminum Synapse as it apparently has some "suspension" that makes it more comfy. The Synapse carbon 105 (sans disc) is about $800 more than the aluminum 105 disc and carbon 105 disc is about 1.1k more. I'm zeroing in on the Synapse at the moment has it's won so many "best of" awards over the last couple of years but will broaden my search over the summer as it gets close to an actual buy/no buy situation.

If I could get a good carbon with 105 groupset I'd be happy. I'd prefer not to go Trek just because that was my last real road bike that I'd put 6k a year on. Just want a different brand if possible for some reason. Gomey's rec last night was interesting.

Gome, to tires: if it's just road crap do they still make those "armadillo" tires? I had them as Michigan roads were horrible.


its all different now. you can find carbon comfort frames, carbon stiff frames, ect, even the new cannondale aluminum CAAD frames are engineered to flex be comfortable like carbon comfort frames. Ti can be engineered to be stiff or flexy.

thats why there was a huge trend just to go back to steel, because its both strong and flexy. plus with the new wheels, component groups, being so light you can get a steel framed bike in that 15-17lbs range easy.

just get that synapse, but do try out all the frame sizes. compact geometry is weird because theoretically one size can fit many (with different stem/angle/seatpost), but often times it still is more comfortable to size up or down and then adjust the stem accordingly. hopefully you fit into one of those generic sizes because people above 6'2" it ends up being a total crapshoot of frame fit in compact geometry.
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