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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, questions, porn) - Page 111

post #1651 of 1797

I thought carbon was stiffer, no?

post #1652 of 1797
Carbon is stiffer, but cheap carbon wheels will probably be shit. The key is having parts built up properly.

Then again, I'm behind on the times and still run 36H King hubs and aluminum rims on my road bike; however, I never have any problems.
post #1653 of 1797

True.  Its not like I can't ride the bike with the wheels it has now.  Its just sort of like an addiction, similar to buying lots of expensive and unnecessary shoes.

post #1654 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

...will upgrade to carbon wheels soon.

Meh, save your money.

Disagree, wheels are the best bang for buck upgrade, and that bike ain't no Craig's List bargain, what are they worth? Around 4/5K? I have no idea about if the stock wheels are any good or not, but if I was paying that many clams for a bike I'd sure as hell make sure it was shod with pretty primo wheels.
post #1655 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Meh, save your money.
I had the same thought, as I ride primarily for exercise.  Plan to do a few tri-sprints every year for fun.

One thing I will say about the wheels I have is that they flex during hard out-of-the saddle uphill climbs, and the brakes rub as a consequence.

FWIW, I was looking at a "cheap" set of carbon wheels, if you could even call them that.  (Reynolds)

Are the wheels true? Are you very big/powerful? I find it hard to believe that the stock wheels on a bike like that would flex enough to rub the brakes unless they is something up or unless you are a beast.
post #1656 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

True.  Its not like I can't ride the bike with the wheels it has now.  Its just sort of like an addiction, similar to buying lots of expensive and unnecessary shoes.

Then buy what makes you happy. I have a NOS 1980s steel frame that I paid way too much for, didn't even care because I love it and it is pretty.
post #1657 of 1797
New frame and fork on the way from Hong Kong. smile.gif
post #1658 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post


Disagree, wheels are the best bang for buck upgrade, and that bike ain't no Craig's List bargain, what are they worth? Around 4/5K? I have no idea about if the stock wheels are any good or not, but if I was paying that many clams for a bike I'd sure as hell make sure it was shod with pretty primo wheels.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post


Are the wheels true? Are you very big/powerful? I find it hard to believe that the stock wheels on a bike like that would flex enough to rub the brakes unless they is something up or unless you are a beast.

 

Bike was 3K marked down from 3800.

 

I'm still pretty new to biking but have done a lot of research.  From what I understand, Specialized sometimes puts crappy wheels on good frames.  These are DT Axis 4.0s.  I've read about other people experiencing the same brake rubbing with these wheels during intense climbing.  I guess I can say I'm a beast for someone my size, but its not like a weigh 225lbs. High power/weight ratio though.  I'm inclined to think that the rubbing has more to do with the lack of rigidity of the wheels that my strength, although it is flattering to think otherwise.

 

Quote:

 

Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post


Then buy what makes you happy. I have a NOS 1980s steel frame that I paid way too much for, didn't even care because I love it and it is pretty.

 

 

I am less interested in the Reynolds now after looking further in to them. I've been reading that they don't brake well (especially in wet) and can be noisy under braking.  Back to looking at Dura-Ace 9000 C35 Clinchers, since they have an aluminum braking strip, seem to have better hubs and sounds as though a lot of research has gone in to their design.  (Off-set spoke pattern, wider flange, ect.)  Probably sounds like a bunch of BS marketing hype to some, but it makes sense to me.

 

I don't really care about having the lightest set of wheels, or the most aero set, but I would like a stiffer set.  Also, as Fang said, a bike like this should have wheels to match.  Admittedly, I probably could have gotten the same workout on a $750 aluminum bike, but I didn't want to get really in to biking and then want to upgrade.  I'm happy with what I bought.  Could have spent much more, but i'm not an expert who competes in races where seconds make a difference.  At my level of riding, I feel that I am able to appreciate the non-necessities that I paid for on this bike.

 

Thanks to everyone for their input.

 

Won't make a move for at least a few weeks, if I end up doing it at all.


Edited by Bakes11771 - 7/13/13 at 9:22am
post #1659 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

True.  Its not like I can't ride the bike with the wheels it has now.  Its just sort of like an addiction, similar to buying lots of expensive and unnecessary shoes.

there are some direct to buyer sellers of wheels that are really popular right now, companies like neuvation, and boyd.

generally the higher the rim, the stiffer the wheel (regardless of build material) right now the trend is getting a little crazy where you'll see people with 50-60mm+ wheel sets on bikes blurring the line between tri-bikes/TT bike wheels. there's the newer trend of putting a deeper rear wheel - but it starts to really look awkward.

there's no denying the aero benefits (but you do have to reach a minimum speed - something like over 20mph), and the deeper the dish the less spokes you need to use, but take note if you live in a windy area cross winds will actually be a factor with even rims in the 40mm range. I've seen guys with the 50mm rims get pushed over on sudden 20mph gusts of winds.

I think the general consensus is "all around" wheels these days is the carbon 38mm rimmed wheels. you can actually keep them light enough, sometimes even 38mm clinchers are sub 1500g and you can find them for great prices if you buy from direct sellers (even cheaper with direct from taiwan sellers).

stopping power/modulation has been improved greatly with new carbon specific brake pads but its not quite the same as aluminum rims.

lastly there's a reason Dura Ace wheels are generally beloved - its one of those always great quality and performance products - but the rims are usually below 30mm, and are overall a little heavier (especially in clincher models).
post #1660 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

I thought carbon was stiffer, no?

A lot of carbon wheels lack side to side stiffness. But they can be made into more aero shapes with less weight which more than makes up for it (if you spend 98% of your time spinning in the saddle, the extra side to side flex for the 2% where you are standing and sprinting isn't such a big deal)
They aren't as bad as they used to be, but you still see sprinters reach down and open up the the quick release on their brakes before a sprint finish.

Carbon's not a magic material. They make stiff carbon frames by using big fat tubes which can be very rigid without using much material. You don't really have that ability in the wheel which can't get any wider than ~23mm. Especially if you are a clincher and have to be strong enough to hold the bead (carbon tubulars > carbon clinchers). If you look at an old carbon bike where the tubes were the same size as a steel frame, you will find that they are pretty damn flexy. But they are lighter than the aluminum frames and FAR more comfortable to ride (aluminum is so stuff that its not comfortable at all since it doesn't absorb anything). Its all a series of tradeoffs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fang66 View Post

Disagree, wheels are the best bang for buck upgrade, and that bike ain't no Craig's List bargain, what are they worth? Around 4/5K? I have no idea about if the stock wheels are any good or not, but if I was paying that many clams for a bike I'd sure as hell make sure it was shod with pretty primo wheels.

Those are pretty decent wheels on there. If you aren't racing or anything, spending $1000+ on carbon rims is kinda silly (disregard if you are in a position to not care about $1000), especially if you are more than 150lbs.
post #1661 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post


there are some direct to buyer sellers of wheels that are really popular right now, companies like neuvation, and boyd.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post


A
Those are pretty decent wheels on there. If you aren't racing or anything, spending $1000+ on carbon rims is kinda silly (disregard if you are in a position to not care about $1000), especially if you are more than 150lbs.

 

Thanks for the input, Gents.  I'll continue to mull it over.

 

I weigh about 180 and will continue to increase my weight because I have been fortunate enough lately to spend A LOT of time in the gym.  $1,000 isn't nothing too me, (I def. would draw the line at $1,500 for wheels, but as Fang said, this bike deserves wheels that do the bike justice.  It's the only upgrade I could see myself doing, if I end up doing it.  It came with Ultegra components, carbon crank, ect.  The handlebars are not carbon, but even I would agree that it would be stupid to upgrade to carbon handlebars.  Also, no carbon pedals or water bottle cages.

 

Will definitely look into the brands that Lawrence mentioned.

post #1662 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post


Thanks for the input, Gents.  I'll continue to mull it over.

I weigh about 180 and will continue to increase my weight because I have been fortunate enough lately to spend A LOT of time in the gym.  $1,000 isn't nothing too me, (I def. would draw the line at $1,500 for wheels, but as Fang said, this bike deserves wheels that do the bike justice.  It's the only upgrade I could see myself doing, if I end up doing it.  It came with Ultegra components, carbon crank, ect.  The handlebars are not carbon, but even I would agree that it would be stupid to upgrade to carbon handlebars.  Also, no carbon pedals or water bottle cages.

Will definitely look into the brands that Lawrence mentioned.

williams and november are also a great direct sellers of carbon wheels and lightweight components, I think November also sells frames.
post #1663 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

Anybody have an opinion on these pedals?

Shimano M324 Combination Pedals

Would be nice to be able to ride clipped in sometimes but be able to hop on the bike without cycleshoes for running quick errands, etc.

I've been using the same set for about ten years now, in total for close to 3k Km/2k miles and they are still going strom. A friend of mine had those for about the same amount of time and just recently changed for a new set after 6k Km, roundabout.
Only downside is that hey are a bit unbalenced so it can be tricky to clip into. You fix that by applying some stick-on weights, like those use to balance car rims, or model airplanes.
Or you try one of Shimanos other combination pedal sets, like the M424: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/shimano-m424-spd-pedals/
post #1664 of 1797
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post


But they are lighter than the aluminum frames and FAR more comfortable to ride (aluminum is so stuff that its not comfortable at all since it doesn't absorb anything). Its all a series of tradeoffs.

This is a complete exaggeration if not completely untrue, the compliance and vibration damping of any frame material is minimal in comparison to that of the tires, and then wheels/saddle/frame geometry. You would get a much bigger jump in comfort by simply going from a 23 mm tire to a 28/30 mm tire or by optimising frame geometry than any change in frame material. And if you are riding on surfaces where compliance or vibration damping are a problem then the larger tire would also almost certainly have lower rolling resistance as well. I've ridden a couple of centuries on my CAAD8 and several on my steel Pinarello, comfort difference is minimal.

"Did you know that:
Aluminum frames have a harsh ride?
Titanium frames are soft and whippy?
Steel frames go soft with age, but they have a nicer ride quality?
England's Queen Elizabeth is a kingpin of the international drug trade?
All of the above statements are equally false."

The late Sheldon Brown.
post #1665 of 1797
dbl post
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