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General Bike Thread (Desiderata, questions, porn) - Page 107

post #1591 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

That's interesting.

My last (very cheap) bike had drop bars and I was either my neck was sore or I was living in fear that without my fingers right by the brakes I wouldn't reach them in time if I ever needed - and people will just dart out into the street...

[n00b]
When you say a more upright seating position - is that something you can change on nearly any bike or would you look specifically for a bike with that sort of position?
[/n00b]

THanks again

also sign up for bikeforums and go to this sub forum specifically: http://www.bikeforums.net/forumdisplay.php/20-Commuting

everyone there is really nice and helpful. this specific thread will give you an idea of what people actually use for commuting http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/49471-Commuter-Bicycle-Pics/page436

go ahead and start a new thread there with the same questions... there are a lot of UK/Euro posters there as well who are often well ahead of the curve of trends (like the above poster with his drop bar single speed disc commuter).
post #1592 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

look for the most inexpensive cyclocross bike with disc brakes. the thing with flat bars is that they are often wider compared to road "drops" handlebars. So you'll actually be able to slip in and out of city traffic easier riding with narrower road drops compared to the wider hybrid/MTB flat bars. Riding on the brake hoods and flats is equivalent to riding with flat bars on a hybrid/MTB.

I guess I really should re-think that. I tried some flat bar bikes last weekend but whenever I get a chance, I'll try some nice road bar ones.

How do cyclocross bikes differ from road bikes? Do they have shocks? Larger tires?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

10miles through london actually sounds like a pretty long tough stressful commute. commuting 10miles through NYC (from brooklyn to the upper west side for me takes about 1hr 10min one way). if the commute is flat you might even consider a inexpensive single speed bike to simplify things (less things to break, less chance of it getting stolen) ect. you also have to consider getting a good lock (which can cost over $100 and you still need a accessory cable to lock up the front wheel/seat/ect).

I'd never ever ever bike to work in NY.

London has made a huge effort to get everyone biking - from the Boris bikes everywhere to the bike 'superhighways' they're making in the suburbs.

I'll mostly be going along the water and at odd times so it'll be pretty civilized apart from the variability of the weather.

Our office has a bike room so I'm not sure I'll even need a lock. Lots of guys have really nice - or at least really expensive bikes and don't bother to lock them so I figure I'll be fine.

If theft isn't so much of an issue, would you still recommend a single speed
Dumb question - that's the same as fixie, right?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

here's my Redline Metro Classic. and in full commuter mode. . It runs about $1000 stock and they have a version called the metro sport that you can find for under $800 (with lesser specs but still the same set up disc braked cyclocrossed commuter).

That's a really cool looking bike. Like the color a lot.

Don't think I'll manage to find redline over here though...
post #1593 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

I guess I really should re-think that. I tried some flat bar bikes last weekend but whenever I get a chance, I'll try some nice road bar ones.

How do cyclocross bikes differ from road bikes? Do they have shocks? Larger tires?
I'd never ever ever bike to work in NY.

London has made a huge effort to get everyone biking - from the Boris bikes everywhere to the bike 'superhighways' they're making in the suburbs.

I'll mostly be going along the water and at odd times so it'll be pretty civilized apart from the variability of the weather.

Our office has a bike room so I'm not sure I'll even need a lock. Lots of guys have really nice - or at least really expensive bikes and don't bother to lock them so I figure I'll be fine.

If theft isn't so much of an issue, would you still recommend a single speed
Dumb question - that's the same as fixie, right?
That's a really cool looking bike. Like the color a lot.

Don't think I'll manage to find redline over here though...


cyclocross bikes are basically road bikes with a bit more upright position and can accommodate larger tires for off road riding. larger tires = less tire pressure needed and a more comfortable ride on the road.

NYC actually has a lot of bike infrastructure these days (too much for the some of the natives) I can do that 10mile commute on 95% bike lanes/shared lanes through the city. but oddly once you get used to riding in the city you end up finding that its sometimes easier/quicker to ride in the streets with the traffic (which is still going below 30mph anyway).

single speed just means only having one speed. a fixie is a fixed gear bike where the pedals will turn no matter what.

if you have a dedicated bike room at work then that means you can invest in a nice bike! seems like your co-workers already have, why not ask them what they ride - they'll be a super valuable resource of info. but you still have to think about locking your bike outside because you never know when you'll stop for errands on the way to/from work. this is a huge factor when it comes to expensive saddles, wheels, accessories like disk brakes/handlebars/ect which can still be stolen from the bike when locked up outside.

I realize that my redline might not be available in the UK, but the trend of disc braked, drop bar commuters is in full force now, so I'm sure there are lots of Euro brands available with similar specs. In fact I remember a guy posting in bike forums that had a nice BMC that was impressive: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread.php/49471-Commuter-Bicycle-Pics?p=14739908&viewfull=1#post14739908
post #1594 of 1756
When you ride on the brake hoods, it looks like this:

Your body is higher up, your hand stance is further form the axis of rotation (so the bike won't feel hard to control like if you grab the bars close together near the stem), and your hands are already on the breaks so there is no fear of the time it might take to reach them.

The fit can (and should) be adjusted on any bike to some extent. A different stem, a setback seat post, different shaped bars--all of these things can be changed when you buy a bike to make it fit you. However, most of that is to make the bike fit you for its intended purpose.
If you buy a racing specific bike, its going to be designed to have you leaned way forward and bending your neck back. A bike with a little more relaxed geometry will have you sitting more upright and not be as squirrely when it comes to turning.

So while you could try to comfort up a racing machine by raising the handlebars and stuff like that, your best bet is to buy a bike with a shape designed to match the kind of riding you want to do, and then just tweaking the fit for your body.
post #1595 of 1756
Great stuff - thanks guys.
post #1596 of 1756
here are a couple online sellers in the UK that have some interesting bikes in the price range:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ridley-x-bow-1317a-sora-2013/

here's one thats more expensive but already has fenders and a better component group: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/charge-filter-hi-2013/

you can save a lot of money if you go with a flat bar hybrid with disc brakes, but flat bars can be terribly restricting (because of only one hand position).
post #1597 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

here are a couple online sellers in the UK that have some interesting bikes in the price range:

http://www.wiggle.co.uk/ridley-x-bow-1317a-sora-2013/

here's one thats more expensive but already has fenders and a better component group: http://www.wiggle.co.uk/charge-filter-hi-2013/

you can save a lot of money if you go with a flat bar hybrid with disc brakes, but flat bars can be terribly restricting (because of only one hand position).

That second one looks slick.
post #1598 of 1756
+ 1 on all the advice.


Drop bars, rim brakes (especially on your budget) or cable pull disks, and Wiggle (I've bought plenty of stuff from them always fast delivery no hassles) There are also several other online shops that I've bought from that are good. Chainreactioncycles is one that comes to mind. Join bikeforums a font of information.

I know a cyclocross bike has been recommended above, that is a good suggestion, but specifically the things I'd look for are;

Clearance and braze-ons for fenders (mudguards).

Clearance for at least 32 mm tires, these are usually designated 700 x 32 C on the tire. I don't think you need thicker than that for city riding. Get slick tires if possible, tread on road bike tires is pointless and decreases grip.

Braze-ons so you can attach racks, it is possible to attach them without braze-ons but it is a hassle.
post #1599 of 1756
You guys have me convinced on the drop bars / cyclecross.

Cycle Scheme starts up again in May for my company (for anyone in the UK, it's an awesome deal - you basically buy the bike in installments from your company using pre-tax earnings so you save 30+% and get financing for free) so I'll likely pull the trigger then.

I guess now it's just a question of trying a few different bikes to see how they feel.

Seems like disc brakes would be nice but less important than the geometry.

Really appreciate the help, fellas.
post #1600 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by ianGP View Post

ermahgerd!

dat Fuji track bike is teh secks!

+1

I like that paint scheme so much better than on mine (the '04)
post #1601 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

look for the most inexpensive cyclocross bike with disc brakes. the thing with flat bars is that they are often wider compared to road "drops" handlebars.


I'll reiterate this on both counts. I insisted on flat bars on my commuter, then bought a CX bike later, and now much prefer riding that one, in part because of the drop bars and multiple positions they afford me. My commuter, a 2009 Trek FX7.6, is very much like the Whyte you linked to (see also the Specialized Vita and numerous others from all the manufacturers).

The advantage of a CX bike is that it'll take wider tires, including some nice, wide, tough commuter tires. A road frame might not handle them. And the entry level CX bikes are often all-arounders that can be used for many purposes.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

disc brakes are great, but V-brakes can be just as powerful and cheaper/simpler/lighter.

Here I'd disagree with the others. I'd get the hydraulic discs if you get a CX bike. First, I don't service mine, I take it to the shop. They just don't require work that often. Second, I find my CX brakes to not be terribly strong. Those V-brakes they typically use (Avid Shortys in my case) have great clearance for mud, etc., but little stopping power (don't really need it in CX anyway, not like on a mt bike or in traffic).
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

here's my Redline Metro Classic. and in full commuter mode. . It runs about $1000 stock and they have a version called the metro sport that you can find for under $800 (with lesser specs but still the same set up disc braked cyclocrossed commuter).

Looks awesome.

I'm considering trading in both my commuter and my CX (Focus Mares AX2) for a Specialized Tricross Disc Sport Compact. Bit more than your budget though, at $1300 US. But I could use this both as a commuter and a weekend CX race bike I think. Or maybe I'll just sell my commuter and keep my other CX. smile.gif
post #1602 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808 View Post

Here I'd disagree with the others. I'd get the hydraulic discs if you get a CX bike. First, I don't service mine, I take it to the shop. They just don't require work that often. Second, I find my CX brakes to not be terribly strong. Those V-brakes they typically use (Avid Shortys in my case) have great clearance for mud, etc., but little stopping power (don't really need it in CX anyway, not like on a mt bike or in traffic).

V- brakes are very powerful. But cantilever brakes (found mostly on cross country bikes these days) are the ones that can be finicky.

here is an example of V brakes:



and here is the cantilever brakes:




when adjusted properly cantilever brakes are great, and since they have 1:1 pull ratios you can use road levers/brifters with them easily. thats why they are still used in cross country bikes. they obviously have very wide clearance for thicker rims/tires. when they fall out of adjustment it can be tricky to fix the issues.

but V-brakes use a higher pull ratio (thats why you find them in flat bar bikes with separate brake levers and shifters. there are newer short pull v-brakes that are supposedly good that can be used with STI/Brifters now so I guess its a happy medium. v-brakes are actually found in less expensive bikes (like flat bar hybrids, entry level MTB) these days. The increased leverage of V-brakes make them very strong and the system is relatively simple to adjust/fix.
post #1603 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by LawrenceMD View Post

V- brakes are very powerful. But cantilever brakes (found mostly on cross country bikes these days) are the ones that can be finicky.

here is an example of V brakes:
.


Sorry. Thanks for the correction, LawrenceMD; I always screw them up. I think of those V-brakes as linear pull brakes. Aren't those synonyms?

Anyway, cantis are what I was talking about.
post #1604 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cantabrigian View Post

Cycle Scheme starts up again in May for my company (for anyone in the UK, it's an awesome deal - you basically buy the bike in installments from your company using pre-tax earnings so you save 30+% and get financing for free) so I'll likely pull the trigger then.


What the hell? Pre-tax? I want in on this deal! Is it just your company that does this as a perk? Or does the UK gov't mandate that employers offer such a thing? Holy crap.
post #1605 of 1756
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808 View Post

What the hell? Pre-tax? I want in on this deal! Is it just your company that does this as a perk? Or does the UK gov't mandate that employers offer such a thing? Holy crap.

Sounds like a UK gov't thing.

We've got something similar on this side of the pond (albeit to a laughably smaller degree), if your employer chooses to participate: http://www.bikeleague.org/news/100708faq.php
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