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Bonsai - Page 3

post #31 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Any practitioners?



lefty

This was taken at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens. It's still there. I enjoyed this section a lot more than I thought I would.
post #32 of 285
That's a complete landscape!
post #33 of 285
I used to raise bonsai, though not at anything resembling a master artisan's level. They are very fussy plants. Because of the absurd pot size to root ball ratio, they need to be watered every single day without fail. I had two die while on vacation because the person housesitting for me forgot to water them one day.
post #34 of 285
Hm...the pictures in this thread have singlehandedly made me consider this hobby. Goodness knows I don't have the time!
post #35 of 285
My girlfriend (authentic J-beezy)'s dad does bonsai, he has a bunch of old ones that he's been working on for 40, 50 years, they're elaborate, like the ones up there planted in rocks, with twisted trunks and branches. That wiring process can take like 5 years. He has them terraced in the front lawn and people passing by will stop and ask him to teach him bonsai. Dude is also worried about who is gonna take care of them when he dies.
post #36 of 285
I have one of Jap Maple and it is not fussy ,does not need much light, can be watered twice a month. I train it a little with wire on a trunk and some weights on the branches, but it does not take a lot of time once you set things up. Because it is a real tree it is very robust and grows very fast. To get the small leafs keep pruning them until the tree understands what size you want.
post #37 of 285
brooklyn botanical garden has a great bonsai collection.

there's a guy who used to volunteer the bonsai dept actually sells bonsai online (i've bought two) and delivers them nationwide using UPS - just google bonsaiofbrooklyn.com

thats where i buy mine. i just buy bonsais though i don't create them.

here's a ginseng ficus i bought. its about two feet tall. its easy to maintain and just needs sunlight through a window.



oh another thing about brooklyn botanical garden? its a great place to sex in public.... especially at night when there's a wedding reception/ceremony going on (there are tons of hiding places that have nice flat grass).
post #38 of 285
I started very young, because I thought when I'm 80 they'll be 70 and I can sell them for 100 bucks. yes, I was young ..

but 4 years later my neighbour ruined it all when I was on holiday when she ignored my rules how to water them. half of them died and the other half grew twice their seize in 2 weeks ..
post #39 of 285
Thread Starter 
I just returned from a 10 day vacation. I was so paranoid about my trees that I left my house-sitter a watering schedule based on the long range forecast and each day I asked for an email watering update.

The Brooklyn collection is very nice.



lefty
post #40 of 285
This is a hobby that would prey perfectly upon my OCD. It's such a remarkable art, though.
post #41 of 285
My plumber is some sort of bonsai master. Cool guy.
post #42 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
I just returned from a 10 day vacation. I was so paranoid about my trees that I left my house-sitter a watering schedule based on the long range forecast and each day I asked for an email watering update.

The Brooklyn collection is very nice.



lefty

another impressive, but small collection i saw was at the botanical gardens in minnesota.
post #43 of 285
Moar pics please. This thread is awesome.
post #44 of 285
Quote:
Originally Posted by holymadness View Post
I used to raise bonsai, though not at anything resembling a master artisan's level. They are very fussy plants. Because of the absurd pot size to root ball ratio, they need to be watered every single day without fail. I had two die while on vacation because the person housesitting for me forgot to water them one day.

+1.

I had two Japanese juniper bonsai trees, in separate pots, that I left in the care of my neighbour while we went to visit the in-laws in Japan for a month.

When we came back, they were virtually dead and although I tried to nurse them back to health, they never recovered.

It's a hobby that can be incredibly rewarding over time, but it requires a lot of patience and a lot of practice to get it right. If you are the sort of person who wants to get the ideal result quicky, bonsai is clearly not the hobby for you...
post #45 of 285
Wouldn't be more reliable than any neighbor/relative?
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