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Winter stuff

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Have American mags started covering the upcoming fall/winter stuff yet? Is there anything that you've seen/heard about that really struck you? The new German edition of GQ just popped into my postbox today, and it had a feature of some designers' upcoming stuff. Two things really stuck out to me: 1) A single-button, single-breasted, peak-lapel velvet morning coat (with split tails) by Ralph Lauren Purple Label. In the mag spread, they paired it with jeans, ugly-ass velvet slippers with RL on them, and a cashmere turtleneck. It struck me as the perfect look for a gallery exhibit premiere or some such activity. Although I definitely appreciate the Chester Barrie quality of RLPL tailored clothing, I've never bought anything from that part of the collection. (I do have a few PL polo shirts, and actually I really, really like the PL bathing suits...) There's never been anything unique enough about them. I have a feeling that this jacket may just be my first. 2) Diagonally cable-knit monochrome cashmere sweater by Jil Sander. In the summer, I bought some diagonally-striped shirts (from Loro Piana and Zara), and the sweaters are a natural evolution. However, with the questionable quality of Jil Sander's post-Prada takeover stuff, and I'm hoping that my favourite sweater-maker (Loro Piana) does something similar. On the downside, they said that the trend for YSL RG next season would be "oversized". I thought Tom Ford wanted to make YSL classic, whilst leaving the hyperfashion dross to Gucci.... (The Gucci spread, a cream leather sportcoat and matching wool trousers, looked more YSL-ly to me.) Peace, JG
post #2 of 8
I saw some of the fall pieces earlier this year.  I'll probably get a couple of striped Prada shirts.  They actually resemble Marc Jacobs pieces, but cut by Prada.  My main interest this year (as in other years), however, is in less well-known designers.  I'll probably pick up a Dirk Schonberger shirt with a shredded "bib-front", for lack of a better description.  And, of course, I'll be looking out for the best streetwear.  I think that Paper Denim & Cloth is still the best denim line out there, and I've already picked up a Frankie B corduroy western shirt/jacket (I've even worn it a few times - I don't recommend it for June in LA). On a peripherally related note, in an attempt to avoid being a fashion victim, I've been customizing designer pieces and wearing them in a way the designers probably never meant them to be worn.  Case in point, I bought a Prada shirt just a half size too large and wear it with the shirt-tail untucked over jeans and sneakers, wearing what was meant as a very tailored, fitted and frankly, very uptight piece in a "summer at the cabin" manner.  I've also converted innumerable shirts from button-ups into snap-ups, sewing the original button onto the back of one of the snaps, to create a sort of trompe d'oeil.  I also had a Borrelli (...) shirt re-cut into a fitted western shirt, with the original mother of pearl buttons glued onto the snaps.  I'm sure that the more conservative in this forum will think that the last example is a great sacrilege (Steve B. lol), but I'd really like to encourage a little more experimentation among the members of this forum.   You are a self-selected group, the supposedly leaders of the curve.  Show that you've got the chops, that you don't need a Miuccia Prada or a Tom Ford or a Alan Flusser telling you how to dress yourself.
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
On a peripherally related note, in an attempt to avoid being a fashion victim, I've been custo2mizing designer pieces and wearing them in a way the designers probably never meant them to be worn.  Case in point, I bought a Prada shirt just a half size too large and wear it with the shirt-tail untucked over jeans and sneakers, wearing what was meant as a very tailored, fitted and frankly, very uptight piece in a "summer at the cabin" manner.  I've also converted innumerable shirts from button-ups into snap-ups, sewing the original button onto the back of one of the snaps, to create a sort of trompe d'oeil.  I also had a Borrelli (...) shirt re-cut into a fitted western shirt, with the original mother of pearl buttons glued onto the snaps.  I'm sure that the more conservative in this forum will think that the last example is a great sacrilege (Steve B. lol), but I'd really like to encourage a little more experimentation among the members of this forum.   You are a self-selected group, the supposedly leaders of the curve.  Show that you've got the chops, that you don't need a Miuccia Prada or a Tom Ford or a Alan Flusser telling you how to dress yourself.
I've never understood this whole deconstruct/reconstruct thing. If you have a good idea, why spend the money for a finished garment, especially one with the impeccable tailoring of a Borelli shirt? Why not just go to a good tailor with your idea and have it bespoke? Speaking of new ideas, here's one I've had that I'd like some feedback on. Basically, take the form of one of the world's oldest garments, the shalwar kameez, update it a little bit. The shalwar (trousers) are flat front, but close with the traditional rope. The kameez is a slimmer-cut, with a few twists that won't make any sense in words but are consonant with my affinity for Saville Row/Neapolitan tailoring traditions. Instead of using the traditional ultralightweight cotton, though, construct it of high-quality wool, partially lined. Knize is currently prototyping one for me, made of Super 120's grade wool by Cerruti as a kind of proof of concept. I'd imagine that if it actually comes to pass that versions I'd sell would be of finer wool, though, Super 150's/15milmil15 grade. This one has a removeable collar, because I'm considering either a band, stand-up,  or cutway collar for the kameez (Tab collars are too trendy, and ugly besides.) Accessoires to go along with it would include a vest that is a twist on the traditional Himalayan winter vest, which is a longer than a Western suit-vest and straight cut on the bottom (not even on the drawing board yet) , and other things I haven't yet considered. This is something I might exhibit, if I can get the cost for a small production run reasonable. Production would be by a fair-trade firm in probably Nigeria, Bangladesh, Jordan, or Pakistan. Peace, JG
post #4 of 8
Hi JoeG, Nice to get a reply. The idea behind the deconstruction/reconstruction bit is to subvert convention - a sort of bespoke vintage, if you will. That's why it's important to work from existing garments. Working from a designer or bespoke piece sends an interesting message, IMO. I realize that it's not for everyone, but I do like your idea of traditional dress cut in modern fabrics and using Savile Row techniques, although I thought that shalwar kameez was exclusively for women. I've actually toyed with the idea a bit myself, although my focus would be on frontier dress. A lot of Mexican migrant workers, and there are many in LA, mix traditional Mexican garments with westernwear like jeans and cowboy boots. I have an idea of recutting the iconic items like Mexican wedding shirts, and making them out of stretch twill or wool/cotton blends rather than linen and lightweight cotton, and in dark colors (moss green and chestnut brown and deep maroon) for winter.
post #5 of 8
A Borrelli recut as a Western Shirt??? Oh the horror, the humanity.... LOL.
post #6 of 8
Now, to answer pstoller's question from another thread on the deconstructed shirt post. First off, you got me. The Borelli shirt had a little bit of fading on the underside of the collar and I'd torn the bottom seam about a half inch, so I figured, why not do something more interesting than just fixing the thing. I do think that the shirt looks pretty good. I think that it has good textural interest, since it is that it is made of a very fine material generally reserved for, well, Borrelli quality shirts. Moreover, the pattern is a bluish green stripe which is again, typical in sports shirts, but rare in western shirts. Lastly, the original pocket, which I had kept on, is displaced into two parts at the seam that appears on the front on western shirt. It is obvious that it used to be a traditional sports shirt. Merely whimsical? I can't make that judgement - but it has gotten a lot of interest, and few people asked me if I was selling them (no).
post #7 of 8
Quote:
...you got me. The Borelli shirt had a little bit of fading on the underside of the collar and I'd torn the bottom seam about a half inch, so I figured, why not do something more interesting than just fixing the thing.
Well, there you go. At that point, anything you do with it is cool, even if it's just for a laugh. Surely "sacrilege" is not even an issue for any manner of recycling a played-out item, no matter how lofty its origins. I mean, isn't reconstructing the shirt better than using it as a shoe rag (even if you ARE polishing John Lobbs with it)?
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
First off, you got me.  The Borelli shirt had a little bit of fading on the underside of the collar and I'd torn the bottom seam about a half inch, so I figured, why not do something more interesting than just fixing the thing.
Oh, that's totally different. I assumed you had lassoed a brand new Borrelli to the slaughterhouse, and was a bit surprised. Do you have any pictures of it? I'm finding it hard to visualise. (Don't know much about Country & Western clothing in general.) Peace, JG
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