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More trends in men's clothing

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Sales of men's tailored clothing in the United States were up 24% in 2004 compared with 2003, according to the NPD Group, a consumer data firm. For the 12 months ended in April 2005, sales of men's tailored clothing were up 8.8% over the previous 12 months. Overall sales of men's apparel were $49 billion in 2004, up from $47 billion in 2003. http://www.jsonline.com/bym/news/jun05/332885.asp Yes, yes, it's about Kohl's, but it highlights much of the broader trend. The fact that Kohl's - Kohl's. - is now stocking suits says more than anything. Can a "Sam's Choice" sportcoat be far behind?
post #2 of 13
I've always wondered why a designer hasn't approached a Costco or Sam's Club and offered to do a line of well-designed, quality clothes that are relatively inexpensive. You can buy Tag Huers at Costco after all. I think it would be a worthy project for a designer -- the beautification of an entire class of people who aren't able to afford high-end clothing. Hell, Helmut Lang isn't doing anything at the moment.
post #3 of 13
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I've always wondered why a designer hasn't approached a Costco or Sam's Club and offered to do a line of well-designed, quality clothes that are relatively inexpensive. You can buy Tag Huers at Costco after all. I think it would be a worthy project for a designer -- the beautification of an entire class of people who aren't able to afford high-end clothing. Hell, Helmut Lang isn't doing anything at the moment.
Costco has done Italian cashmere sweaters. Also, they do quality leather coats and wool/cashmere overcoats.
post #4 of 13
To effectively sell suits, you need a large range of sizes and a good alterations staff. Costco doen't have the space and on-site tailors are fewer and father between than they used to be. I love many of the clothes I've bought from Costco. They always offfer a good value.
post #5 of 13
I predict that in one year people will get fed up with crappy suits and sportsjackets and go back to wearing polo shirts and pants that actually fit.
post #6 of 13
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I predict that in one year people will get fed up with crappy suits and sportsjackets and go back to wearing polo shirts and pants that actually fit.
When was this, that they were doing this, again?
post #7 of 13
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When was this, that they were doing this, again?  
Well ok you got me there, but it's still relatively easier to find good-fitting pants instead of good-fitting jackets or suits. There are more variables involved in the latter. I think a lot of people will become disillusioned with the whole "dress-up" thing and start reverting back to casual. Hell, it's happening to me already.
post #8 of 13
To be honest, almost noone looks good in off-the-rack suits. That's why it's important to get a good tailor on your side. I'm broad-shouldered and V-shaped (mostly), so I buy jackets based on my shoulder size and have my tailor take them in at the waist. There's no substitute for the proper adjustments and with them, you can take a cheap suit and make it fit you like a glove.
post #9 of 13
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To be honest, almost noone looks good in off-the-rack suits.  That's why it's important to get a good tailor on your side.   I'm broad-shouldered and V-shaped (mostly), so I buy jackets based on my shoulder size and have my tailor take them in at the waist.  There's no substitute for the proper adjustments and with them, you can take a cheap suit and make it fit you like a glove.
Well I know this already. I just hope that the stores these guys are going to will have proper alterations tailors and salespeople that know how suits and jackets should fit. BUT MOST DO NOT. So people will still look like trash. Then they will say, "Hey, why am I paying $500+ to look like trash when I can wear my Dockers?"
post #10 of 13
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You can buy Tag Huers at Costco after all.
And Omega and Cartier.
post #11 of 13
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-- the beautification of an entire class of people who aren't able to afford high-end clothing.
What do you mean? There's a major difference between being able to afford higher end clothing and choosing to purchase it. Many people who shop at Costco and other off price retailers could more than afford to shop at Bergdorfs and have bespoke shoes. They simply choose not to as they view it as wasteful or just don't care. Just like many of the posters on this board who purchase high-end clothing and may exhibit clothing snobbery may not be able to truly afford it (and compensate for that by buying into such brands and images).
post #12 of 13
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(gorgekko @ June 12 2005,18:25) -- the beautification of an entire class of people who aren't able to afford high-end clothing.
What do you mean? There's a major difference between being able to afford higher end clothing and choosing to purchase it. Many people who shop at Costco and other off price retailers could more than afford to shop at Bergdorfs and have bespoke shoes. They simply choose not to as they view it as wasteful or just don't care. Just like many of the posters on this board who purchase high-end clothing and may exhibit clothing snobbery may not be able to truly afford it (and compensate for that by buying into such brands and images).
Huh, that could be a perfect example of South Florida, just like all the mansions / estate homes with no furniture in them for years. Jon.
post #13 of 13
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(j @ June 12 2005,20:51) When was this, that they were doing this, again?  
Well ok you got me there, but it's still relatively easier to find good-fitting pants instead of good-fitting jackets or suits. There are more variables involved in the latter. I think a lot of people will become disillusioned with the whole "dress-up" thing and start reverting back to casual. Hell, it's happening to me already.
I think there are a couple of flawed premises in here: (1) That people who wear ill fitting suits do so because of lack of funds, and they will wear nice fitting pants and polos if that is their standard business dress. I just don't buy this premise for the most part. People who wear well-fitting biz casual will end up wearing well-fitting suits. People who wear ill-fitting suits probably will wear ill fitting biz casual attire. People who wear boring suits (grey, white shirt, red rep striped tie) will wear boring biz casual (dockers, french blue shirt, ken cole shoes). People who look sharp in cheap biz casual will find some way to look sharp -- at least to the nondiscerning eye -- in cheap suits. (2) More people are spending disposable income on tailored clothes. I don't quite buy this premise either. I would be curious whether the trends in men's tailored clothing are being driven by new customers, or whether people who have always worn business formal have been (a) replenishing tired suit collections in discrete chunks, and are doing so now because high quality wools have become less expensive over the past couple of years and because of noticeable mainstream style changes, or (b) are opting for more suits overall because it is now more acceptable to branch out in terms of seasonal suits, different colors, and different patterns. Personally, I see no more men wearing suits nowadays than I did five years ago -- but of those in suits, I see a greater proportion nowadays wearing suits in glen plaids, lighter colors, double vents, etc. Men with disposable income that wear suits simply don't want to have a closet full of plain navy and grey suits. As for whether the suit will disappear in the future, I'd think not. A high quality, well fitting suit is within the means of most business people due to the influx of Ebay and b&m discounters. And such a garment still is the most flattering thing a professional man can wear, IMO. It simply masks physical flaws better than any other garment out there.
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