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Find me a bike - Page 3

post #31 of 71
I'm actually looking around for a fixed gear bike to ride around D.C. (or Chicago, if I can't find a job in Washington) this summer. I'm down with irony.

Is craigslist my best bet?
post #32 of 71
I'm late but I'd say that the hybrids are the best for the OP's demands. I had a couple of Giants (Link) and they were ok hybrids. I didn't see them mentioned yet... I assume that the components are better today then when I had them. Hybrids suck for any kind of real mountain biking though. I ended up getting one of the first full suspension mtn bikes (front and rear) when they started making them and they sucked as well.
post #33 of 71
Sorry, I'm rushing out and don't have time for a complete post, but i think a CYCLOCROSS bike would suit all your needs. Drop bars, almost roadbike, but with a much more forgiving riding position and tires that will be able to take you off the road.
post #34 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by wmmk View Post
I'm actually looking around for a fixed gear bike to ride around D.C. (or Chicago, if I can't find a job in Washington) this summer. I'm down with irony.

Is craigslist my best bet?

Urban hipster in training?

bikesdirect.com has a bunch of cheapo fixed/single speeds.
Actually they have a bunch of cheapo bikes in general.
The problem with them is that you really need to know what you want and what you're doing
if you order from them.
The other thing is that they've licensed hallowed bike names from the past and slapped them on
generic Asian made frames. That's really not going to pass the hipster test.
post #35 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkw View Post
Sorry, I'm rushing out and don't have time for a complete post, but i think a CYCLOCROSS bike would suit all your needs. Drop bars, almost roadbike, but with a much more forgiving riding position and tires that will be able to take you off the road.

If you intend to do downhill mountain biking, then disregard, otherwise...

If you want only one bike, to do the road, commute and eventually go off road on moutains and so, without jumps and such, probably a cyclocross bike is the one you need.

A cyclo-cross bike is a bike with road geometry, drop bars, a little more relaxed and with clearance for wide tyres.

You could have one cyclo-cross bike and 3 sets of wheels.
  • one set 700x23c to 700x25c to do sports-oriented road riding.
  • one set 700x35c to 700x40c knobly tyres for off-road
  • one set ~700x32c-700x42c for commuting/touring.
or skip the touring/racing pair and have just one set of slick 700x28c for road and one knobly 700x35c for off-road.

You could have also removable fenders, so you can use them when commuting and removing them for the sport.

the disadvantages
  • A Cyclo-Cross bike has Canti-Lever brakes, for a wider tyre clearance, but these breaks are less powerful than standard road or MTB V-Brakes, anyway they can stop you, but you need to apply more force on the brake levers.
  • A Cyclo-Cross bike doesn't have suspension, so downhill or jumps are probably not possible

  • A Cyclo-Cross bike has drop handlebars, that could be somewhat less comfortable for touring/commuting ( however I much prefer them than flat bars)
  • A Cyclo-Cross bike has a gearing in-between road and touring. This could be an advantage more than a disadvantage however.
Check out this generic pictures of cyclo-cross bikes








... and this is mine

post #36 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakewolf View Post
[*]A Cyclo-Cross bike has Canti-Lever brakes, for a wider tyre clearance, but these breaks are less powerful than standard road or MTB V-Brakes, anyway they can stop you, but you need to apply more force on the brake levers.

Remember, you can get disc brakes on a cyclox, and trus me those make a hell of a difference.
You can also get by with 28c tires, for most uses, including your dirt trail, as long as it isnt loose. 32cs might be useful, but either way, as long as it has a bit of knobbliness, you should be fine


Edit, that's a sexy bike lake wolf... I'm very jealous it's actually jaw droppingly beautiful

Here are some of mine...




post #37 of 71
You could go for style with a Pashley http://www.pashley.co.uk/


But seriously the cyclocross or 700 wheeled tourer seems your sort of bike. I go for a 26" wheeled tourer myself but them I am after endurance and weight carrying (my wife's stuff as well as my own) rather than speed.
post #38 of 71
Nice! This is turning into a bike porn thread. Gets my blood going. It's been a few years since I last rode a real bike (GT Zaskar LE, stiff as a pole).
post #39 of 71
post #40 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
Nice! This is turning into a bike porn thread. Gets my blood going. It's been a few years since I last rode a real bike (GT Zaskar LE, stiff as a pole).
well while we're at it, i'm finally having my first completely new trail bike built. i've been hitting the trails since late last year on a 2nd hand xc bike and after getting to like the sport, and knowing what i think i want in a bike, i ordered a yeti 575 frame. once its done its gonna look like this (with the same group components and fork)
post #41 of 71
Question: can you really climb (I mean really climb - Rocky Mountain switchbacks) on a cycle-cross bike?
post #42 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
No one has mentioned frame material yet. I am going to assume, comfort is an issue. Outside of seating stance, I think frame material plays the biggest role. I would stay away from aluminum. From there, your price point will determine, i.e chrome moly vs. titanium, etc.
Unless he's planning on doing a signficant amount of miles (i.e. 50+ miles), I'm not convinced Aluminum makes for a choice to rule out.

Even then, most modern day aluminum bikes are fairly forgiving when compared to those of years ago. Frame geometry and fit are a more determining factor when looking at levels of comfort.

All in all, I have been considering the addition of possibly making room for a steel single-speed in the garage, it'll be nice to have something simple but fun to ride around the neighborhood.
post #43 of 71
mtbr.com
post #44 of 71
post #45 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chas View Post

Though I don't one, this is a beautiful bike.
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