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How can I pull myself out of this self-induced rut? - Page 4

post #46 of 191
Thread Starter 
I am sorry if you don't want to work 40 hours a week, with upwards of 2 hours worth of commuting a day, but son, welcome to america, this is what it is.

is this directed at me?

I want to work 40+ a week dude. 2 hours worth of commute for work would kill me as far as fuel goes, where the hell do you live that requires a 2 hour daily commute, thats gotta be a real bitch.
post #47 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by constant struggle View Post
I must be a freak then, still at the same job, and moving onward on my career path.

talk to me in 10 years.
post #48 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbie View Post
I am sorry if you don't want to work 40 hours a week, with upwards of 2 hours worth of commuting a day, but son, welcome to america, this is what it is.

is this directed at me?

I want to work 40+ a week dude. 2 hours worth of commute for work would kill me as far as fuel goes, where the hell do you live that requires a 2 hour daily commute, thats gotta be a real bitch.

this is directed at anyone
im saying if it takes 2 hours a day to commute, that is what you need to deal with, everything can't be easy...

I really say go back to school man get an associates. The thing really is, you need to establish your own direction in life, you can't just go through the motions. I know plenty of people who after 4 years of college still have no idea what they want to do, are sitting at home without a job, and are wondering why they don't have one.

All I am saying is you need to really take direction on your own, be prepared to make sacrifices, and don't quit. You will be successful if so.
post #49 of 191
dude, he's self sufficient and getting married, you make coin and live at home. you guys are world's apart, so i don;t know how useful your advice is/how well it will be received.
post #50 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekunk07 View Post
have to continue, here sorry.

believe me, the world conspires against you, so don;t conspire against yourself. i don't have the world by the balls by any stretch, but i make a very nice living, have a solid house, a great wife and kids. statistically, none of this should have happened. i grew up with a single mom who i love dearly but was/is screwy as shit, no father, in a kinda crappy neighborhood with no money at all. didn't have a vacation til i got married. couldn't take karate, piano, even afford little league uniform. if not for my grandparenmts, i';d have no education at all-they paid for catholic school as i was zoned for the worst high school in nyc. sorry for the feeling sorry for myself, but i have a point here.

i dropped out of college a week into freshman year because i didn't think i deserved or was entitled to any modicum of higher achievement. took a security job for $8/hr. 6 months later, i went back to school, and realized i could do better and did deserve better.

believe me, do something now or you will perpetuate the cycle and your eventual children will be in the same boat. you owe it to yourself to do better.


If I could give you rep, I would.
post #51 of 191
School is an extremely expensive endeavor both in financial and time investment. Choose very wisely what you want to study; a college degree in "liberal arts" is next to useless and a waste of 4 years + tuition. I wouldn't even bother completing one; rather try to jump back into school and transfer into something else. A college degree isn't an entitlement to anything anymore since every tom dick and harry has one or more. Study something you are passionate for and has career potential; ie drafting, engineering, architecture, medicine, etc.
post #52 of 191
Take a picture that reminds you of a realistic negative result you would have in your life if you don't change and hang it up. If there is no picture, write out every bad thing you hope to avoid in life and hang that up. Every fricking time you feel "unmotivated", look at it. That should be your motivation.
post #53 of 191
Get some IT certifications... it doesn't require a degree and the work doesn't seem that difficult (sometimes time consuming I guess). It seems like a good niche to be in because it seems complicated for managers, and it's not considered interesting/desirable work to engineers.
post #54 of 191
I told you exactly how to get back into school. Get married. Apply for finacial aid. Done.
post #55 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmt View Post
Get some IT certifications... it doesn't require a degree and the work doesn't seem that difficult (sometimes time consuming I guess).

This is a good idea.
I know a guy who is a nerd of the highest order. He had many, many IT certs, and began teaching to others wanting to earn their certs. He ended up publishing a book on how to become certified and earned legitimate 6-figure income for the next four of five years. He'd be in really good shape had he not developed a taste for a certain white powdery substance and the whores who seemed to accompany the marching dust.
post #56 of 191
i saw this thread, and immeditately saw 100000 viable options to be given, and 100000 "viable" excuses to be given.
post #57 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmt View Post
Get some IT certifications... it doesn't require a degree and the work doesn't seem that difficult (sometimes time consuming I guess).

It seems like a good niche to be in because it seems complicated for managers, and it's not considered interesting/desirable work to engineers.

A lot of IT jobs are still going to require an undergrad degree on job postings, and you will be at a handicap without it, but with enough experience nobody really cares. The OP could definitely get some low-level certs and get a helpdesk job or assistant sys admin at a small company. He'll probably have to grind that out for a while and try to build some real experience while studying in his free time. I'd suggest looking at small to medium-sized companies because you'll be able to gain a wider variety of experience faster, and be able to determine what you most enjoy in the field. That's very important for long-term happiness. There are some things that I absolutely hate doing, but others enjoy the same thing I hate.

Now to address the IT is easy part....

There's a lot of work in IT that does not require a whole lot of brain power. There's probably a lot of systems admins that do little but babysit servers and perform upgrades, but decent problem-solving skills are still required, and it's amazing to me how many people completely lack them. How good your problem-solving skills have to be depends on how far you want to climb. They can be developed, but only to a certain extent.

I've worked with a lot of useless IT people that couldn't figure things out on their own, even programmers and expensive network consultants (that probably went through some community college program and braindumped exams). I would be surprised if someone that "applied themselves at school at still did poorly" would excel. I'm not trying to be cruel, but realistic. If someone isn't good at learning at a university level, they should be doing a trade or something hands-on that doesn't require a lot of reading and learning. Even at a lower level, I would say that you need to be of slightly above average intelligence.

I know this because I am mentoring and training my boss' brother right now (you can guess how he got hired), and although he is enthusiastic, he is finding a lot of things hard. I don't see him ever doing much beyond fairly low-level systems administration work. 40-50k/yr for him would be pretty good though. For reference, I have been working with him since september. He has constant hands-on at work, and I let him study in his free-time at work (he has a lot of it because I can't put him on demanding tasks), but he has yet to pass a single MCSE exam (there are 8 for the cert), let alone the more difficult cisco stuff. He's a pretty average guy. Maybe I am being harsh on him, but that is my experience from taking a guy with better than average computer skills to some level of competency inside a medium-sized business that is very IT intensive.

I would emphasize that if IT doesn't seem complicated, it is complicated. Anyone that thinks it isn't, hasn't worked in a big enough environment, or worked with technology at a high enough level. I am constantly amazed at the depth of knowledge that some people have. The bookshelf that I am working through for my CCIE cert. contains about 15-20 big dense books on what is essentially a narrow field within IT. Most people will never work at that level and can be quite content with less demanding jobs, but I'm just saying...

Lastly, IT at the mid to high level can be very stressful and you constantly have to be learning new stuff. Many get sick of the certification/recertification grind. When thigns go wrong you need to be the type of person that can still think clearly with people breathing down your neck. Without a good aptitude for computers and a strong interest in how technology works, I would recommend against it, unless you're content to just have job security and make 40-50k/yr, which I guess isn't bad for a lot of people. Anyway, there's already too many people in IT that have no clue wtf they are doing and hate their jobs. If you really arne't good at reading/studying, choose hands-on trade. You'll make as much or more than in IT, and almost certainly with a lot less stress.
post #58 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekunk07 View Post
have to continue, here sorry.

believe me, the world conspires against you, so don;t conspire against yourself. i don't have the world by the balls by any stretch, but i make a very nice living, have a solid house, a great wife and kids. statistically, none of this should have happened. i grew up with a single mom who i love dearly but was/is screwy as shit, no father, in a kinda crappy neighborhood with no money at all. didn't have a vacation til i got married. couldn't take karate, piano, even afford little league uniform. if not for my grandparenmts, i';d have no education at all-they paid for catholic school as i was zoned for the worst high school in nyc. sorry for the feeling sorry for myself, but i have a point here.

i dropped out of college a week into freshman year because i didn't think i deserved or was entitled to any modicum of higher achievement. took a security job for $8/hr. 6 months later, i went back to school, and realized i could do better and did deserve better.

believe me, do something now or you will perpetuate the cycle and your eventual children will be in the same boat. you owe it to yourself to do better.

couldnt have said it better myself.
post #59 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
A lot of IT jobs are still going to require an undergrad degree on job postings, and you will be at a handicap without it, but with enough experience nobody really cares. The OP could definitely get some low-level certs and get a helpdesk job or assistant sys admin at a small company. He'll probably have to grind that out for a while and try to build some real experience while studying in his free time. I'd suggest looking at small to medium-sized companies because you'll be able to gain a wider variety of experience faster, and be able to determine what you most enjoy in the field. That's very important for long-term happiness. There are some things that I absolutely hate doing, but others enjoy the same thing I hate.

Now to address the IT is easy part....

There's a lot of work in IT that does not require a whole lot of brain power. There's probably a lot of systems admins that do little but babysit servers and perform upgrades, but decent problem-solving skills are still required, and it's amazing to me how many people completely lack them. How good your problem-solving skills have to be depends on how far you want to climb. They can be developed, but only to a certain extent.

I've worked with a lot of useless IT people that couldn't figure things out on their own, even programmers and expensive network consultants (that probably went through some community college program and braindumped exams). I would be surprised if someone that "applied themselves at school at still did poorly" would excel. I'm not trying to be cruel, but realistic. If someone isn't good at learning at a university level, they should be doing a trade or something hands-on that doesn't require a lot of reading and learning. Even at a lower level, I would say that you need to be of slightly above average intelligence.

I know this because I am mentoring and training my boss' brother right now (you can guess how he got hired), and although he is enthusiastic, he is finding a lot of things hard. I don't see him ever doing much beyond fairly low-level systems administration work. 40-50k/yr for him would be pretty good though. For reference, I have been working with him since september. He has constant hands-on at work, and I let him study in his free-time at work (he has a lot of it because I can't put him on demanding tasks), but he has yet to pass a single MCSE exam (there are 8 for the cert), let alone the more difficult cisco stuff. He's a pretty average guy. Maybe I am being harsh on him, but that is my experience from taking a guy with better than average computer skills to some level of competency inside a medium-sized business that is very IT intensive.

I would emphasize that if IT doesn't seem complicated, it is complicated. Anyone that thinks it isn't, hasn't worked in a big enough environment, or worked with technology at a high enough level. I am constantly amazed at the depth of knowledge that some people have. The bookshelf that I am working through for my CCIE cert. contains about 15-20 big dense books on what is essentially a narrow field within IT. Most people will never work at that level and can be quite content with less demanding jobs, but I'm just saying...

Lastly, IT at the mid to high level can be very stressful and you constantly have to be learning new stuff. Many get sick of the certification/recertification grind. When thigns go wrong you need to be the type of person that can still think clearly with people breathing down your neck. Without a good aptitude for computers and a strong interest in how technology works, I would recommend against it, unless you're content to just have job security and make 40-50k/yr, which I guess isn't bad for a lot of people. Anyway, there's already too many people in IT that have no clue wtf they are doing and hate their jobs. If you really arne't good at reading/studying, choose hands-on trade. You'll make as much or more than in IT, and almost certainly with a lot less stress.

i know you detest me, but i say +1 to this post. some people think IT is a dumping ground for people who cant cut it in engineering or what have you.
far from truth. i know so many intelligent (not just brain smart) people in IT. and who possess more sense and professionalism than the people in the next dept over in accounting or engineering or science r and d, or whatever. there is smart people everywhere. basically that is my point. and dumb people everywhere.
post #60 of 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by sho'nuff View Post
couldnt have said it better myself.

+1 I was always going to finish school, but i started makign decent money and got distracted. I was also sick of the things that I was studying. Since I'm in IT I almost fell into the trap of saying "fuck it," but I'm glad that I didn't. I would hate to hit a glass-ceiling later on because i didn't have a degree. I know that it's against the common wisdom here, but I say that if you're going to go to school, it should be for something you can enjoy studying. Once I was sure I was going to stay in IT I switched my major to classics so that I wouldn't be miserable while working/studying.
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