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Gordon Gekko from "Wall Street" - Page 5

post #61 of 110
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I suppose it should be obvious, but Sills is defunct now?
Morty Sills died in 2001. His son kept the business open for a while. Perhaps it is still open; I don't know. The shop was always at 18 East 53rd.
post #62 of 110
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But more importantly, I loved that tattersall shirt Douglas is wearing in that scene.
That shirt is not tatersall. That's one of the famous horizontal or "Gekko" stripes that appears in the film. (The other is the scene at the art auction.)
post #63 of 110
Okay, after all this talk, I actually went and rented the movie yesterday and watched for the first time, 18 years late. To return to the original topic: the shirts are great. Oh, and I love the character (John McGinley??), Sheen's fellow broker. He plays that the same way that he played the soldier in Platoon ("I got a bad feelin' about this one Bob")
post #64 of 110
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Okay, after all this talk, I actually went and rented the movie yesterday and watched for the first time, 18 years late. To return to the original topic: the shirts are great. Oh, and I love the character (John McGinley??), Sheen's fellow broker.   He plays that the same way that he played the soldier in Platoon ("I got a bad feelin' about this one Bob")
"Forget about charts, buddy..I'm offering you the Knicks, and chicks..." koi
post #65 of 110
were any of the shirts made for mr sheen. i remember towards the end he had a pink and white candy stripe with contrast collar that resembled a gekko shirt. if Alex is willing to respond that would be greatly appreciated. oh, and was the small amount of curvature in the collar added or was that just how the collar laid on michael duglase? thanks. anyone who doesnt like gekkos shirts in that movie is Nuts.
post #66 of 110
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Okay, after all this talk, I actually went and rented the movie yesterday and watched for the first time, 18 years late. To return to the original topic: the shirts are great. Oh, and I love the character (John McGinley??), Sheen's fellow broker.   He plays that the same way that he played the soldier in Platoon ("I got a bad feelin' about this one Bob")
Yeah... Marv is a great character. Great to see this fine actor finally get the broader recognition/fame that he deserves (via his role on SCRUBS...).
post #67 of 110
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Quote:
(Mr Checks @ June 08 2005,06:48) Okay, after all this talk, I actually went and rented the movie yesterday and watched for the first time, 18 years late. To return to the original topic: the shirts are great. Oh, and I love the character (John McGinley??), Sheen's fellow broker.   He plays that the same way that he played the soldier in Platoon ("I got a bad feelin' about this one Bob")
Yeah... Marv is a great character. Great to see this fine actor finally get the broader recognition/fame that he deserves (via his role on SCRUBS...).
Stone obviously thinks highly of him (he's in practically every film he did). koji
post #68 of 110
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(jamesbond) were any of the shirts made for mr sheen. i remember towards the end he had a pink and white candy stripe with contrast collar that resembled a gekko shirt. if Alex is willing to respond that would be greatly appreciated. oh, and was the small amount of curvature in the collar added or was that just how the collar laid on michael duglase? thanks. anyone who doesnt like gekkos shirts in that movie is Nuts.
In reverse order: All of my collars have a curve ranging from slight to ... not-so-slight. As regards shirts for others in the movie besides Mr. Douglas: At the time, my m-t-m company was making the custom shirts being sold by Alan Flusser. We made many m-t-m shirts for others in the movie. For whom I don't know because we customarily worked by order numbers, not names. FYI though, that pink candy stripe was a favorite of Alan's. He ordered scads of them. (But back then they all had long sleeves) Mr. Douglas's shirts were not made by my m-t-m company. They were made by us in my custom studio.
post #69 of 110
How does it work, when making a movie? Did Alan Flusser decide what Michael Douglas was wearing or was he allowed some input of his own?
post #70 of 110
Alan decided the suits. I decided the shirts. The actor stood there and got "wardrobed".
post #71 of 110
Great job. Where do I sign in?
post #72 of 110
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Alan decided the suits. I decided the shirts. The actor stood there and got "wardrobed".
So the important questions Alex, are; Who went first? Did you shirt him, and then Flusser picked suits to go with the shirts, or the other way around? Who got paid more? And did he get to keep the shirts?
post #73 of 110
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Alan decided the suits. I decided the shirts. The actor stood there and got "wardrobed".
What does the wardrobe stylist, the on recognized in the credits of the movie, do then? I remember reading how Ralph Lauren took a lot of credit for the look of the movie The Great Gatsby with Robert Redford, when it was actually the stylist who really determined the look. I was always under the impression that the clothes seen in a movie or a magazine were sent to the stylist, and it was the stylist's responsibility to choose which ones were used and how they would fit together.
post #74 of 110
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(Tokyo Slim) Who went first? Did you shirt him, and then Flusser picked suits to go with the shirts, or the other way around?
In usual practice, given that suits generally average six to ten times the price of a shirt (which is why you should have ten times as many shirts), suits are selected first. Alan supplied me with swatches of the suits he had decided to make and I selected shirt fabrics which were appropriate for the desired look and which were appropriate to be worn with one or more of the suits.
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(Tokyo Slim) Who got paid more?
As the generally accepted proportion is five suits to 30 shirts, it usually works out to approximately the same dollar value. However, not being a wearer of Flusser suits, I haven't a clue what they were costing in those days. If truth be told, I don't even remember what my shirts sold for back then. Probably $10-$15 apiece.
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(Tokyo Slim) And did he get to keep the shirts?
It is virtually always that 'name' actors get to keep their wardrobe if they want it. The contract usually calls for it. In this particular case, certain shape-enhancing devices were built into the shirt construction which would have rendered them uncomfortable for 'off the set' use. Though he may have kept them, I really don't know.
post #75 of 110
...certain shape-enhancing devices were built into the shirt construction which would have rendered them uncomfortable for 'off the set' use. [quote] Artificial pecs? Bicep enhancement? the possibilities are endless...
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