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A Proposal for Thread-sh*tters: temporary ban - Page 21

post #301 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by DocHolliday View Post
No, I just saved myself the hassle of a return and the possibility of taking grief here. People wouldn't have bought it because SF has decided a "fair price" for a Polo sportcoat. Too bad all Polo sportcoats don't cost the same.

Establishing unofficial price caps on various brands -- the "fair price" -- is a very effective way to limit the stuff we see in B&S to that which goes unwanted long enough to make it to those deep-discount pricepoints. Not that you can't get some nice stuff that way, but I'd rather see specimens people think are outstanding, even if they cost a bit more, rather than just absolute final markdown stuff.

I think you put too much stock in the notion of price caps or "fair pricing". Safe to say if a nice staple is presented, say a solid navy, medium or light grey suit or blazer in a "majority" size--38-44--it will get snatched up at a reasonable price, probably for whatever it was originally listed at by seller. Patterns/textureds become more subjective as the majority of buyers are looking for more conservative styles, with a greater degree of flexibilty, though there are particular patterns and colorways that seem to have more universal appeal. Granted the staples rarely come to market at a deep discount, which is why people may be willing to pay a bit more when they do come around. And it's also true that certain labels garner more attention, no better example of that being the earlier referenced "Borrelli" coat which drew a chorus of oohs and ahhs, before being called out as a fake, and a fairly bad one at that.

As a buyer I am always on the lookout for exceptional stuff for which I am willing to pay a bit more. I would rather have a few outstanding pieces than a closetful of mediocrity. As a seller, you must trust your judgement as to what that stuff is.
post #302 of 304
Let's not forget the Stealth Thread-Shitters -- the ones who ask the rhetorical questions...
post #303 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by instep View Post
I modified my original post when I reread your post... but not quickly enough for your quote in turn! My apologies for the mistake. My point is that most people will still factor the provenence and/or scarcity and/or 'intrinsic value' (i.e. looks, feel, fit, material, etc) of an item when assessing how much it is 'worth' and how much they are willing to pay. Not all SF sales here are at 70-85% off. Nor is anyone saying that they won't pay >$400 for any PRL branded jacket - other factors always come into play. 48L jackets linger on against the dying of the light, but 36-38Rs are sold like *snap* at prices above what 42-44Rs go for. If the design/material/fit/cut of the jacket you mentioned was indeed as awesome as you made it out to be, then I'm sure out there in the SF fora someone would be willing to pay a little extra for it. Like me, for example. I'm a 40R, btw.
This post actually helps me understand the opposing viewpoing it a bit better. I can see what you're saying, but I don't think it works that way in practical application. SF tends to assign a price range for commonly seen brands. Go outside that price range, and it's a hard sell indeed. That's fine, and I'd argue it's an example of the market regulating itself, and one reason we don't need thread crapping. But we've just spent dozens of pages arguing whether the information on how much a Polo sportcoat is "worth" should be injected into sellers' threads. I'm arguing that it's not that simple. Sure, you can buy Polo sportcoats for $250 sometimes, but if I find a nice one for more than that and want to pass it along, I don't need a rude know-it-all coming into my thread telling me my item's my too expensive. Yet that's the very definition of thread crapping, neither factoring in variables on the sellers' end nor the desirability of the item. And it really will scare away buyers. Why not let people make up their own minds?
post #304 of 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by AJL View Post
I think you put too much stock in the notion of price caps or "fair pricing". Safe to say if a nice staple is presented, say a solid navy, medium or light grey suit or blazer in a "majority" size--38-44--it will get snatched up at a reasonable price, probably for whatever it was originally listed at by seller. Patterns/textureds become more subjective as the majority of buyers are looking for more conservative styles, with a greater degree of flexibilty, though there are particular patterns and colorways that seem to have more universal appeal. Granted the staples rarely come to market at a deep discount, which is why people may be willing to pay a bit more when they do come around. And it's also true that certain labels garner more attention, no better example of that being the earlier referenced "Borrelli" coat which drew a chorus of oohs and ahhs, before being called out as a fake, and a fairly bad one at that. As a buyer I am always on the lookout for exceptional stuff for which I am willing to pay a bit more. I would rather have a few outstanding pieces than a closetful of mediocrity. As a seller, you must trust your judgement as to what that stuff is.
I agree with you, especially your last paragraph. But, in my experience, thread crapping tends to miss all this. I could offer a beautiful navy blazer in 38R and hear stuff like "your coat is too expensive, people bought PL sportcoats from Woodberry for less." And the funny thing about Woodberry is that people have rushed to the phones time and again to buy expensive items they haven't even seen. But the brand, the frenzy, and the fact that it's a "bargain" sells it. Meanwhile, our sellers go to the hassle and trouble of buying an item, photographing it, measuring it, posting it, answering questions, shipping, etc., and none of that matters if a thread crapper comes along. If someone chimes in that the item is overpriced, even if that critic is wrong, odds are good that item won't move. That's the power of thread crappers. The bad ones hurt not just sellers but inexperienced buyers who might be better off paying $450 for a navy Polo blazer than $250 for a linen PL sportcoat in glen plaid with lime green overcheck.
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