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post #16 of 32
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(Thracozaag @ June 11 2005,06:01)
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Originally Posted by esquire.,June 11 2005,04:03
I watched the last one just to check out Vanilla Ice, who doesn't get the respect he deserves. Years from now, historians will recognize how important and integral he was in the rap movement music. Without him, there would be no Eminem today. I still love his eponymous anthem 'Ice, Ice Baby' and crank it up whenever I hear it.
Good god, I hope you're joking. koji
Why do you think I am joking? 'Ice, Ice Baby' has all the qualities of a great song. 1) Infectious beat and sound. They took a great beat, from David Bowie and Queen's song 'Under Pressure', and took it to the next level to the panthenon of one of the greatest beats of all time. That little 'ting' at the end made all the difference. 2) Great Lyrics. Vanilla Ice was not just frontin' when he proclaimed 'Take heed, 'cause I'm a lyrical poet'. We haven't seen such beautiful lyrics since the rise of Rakim: Ice ice baby, ice ice baby All right stop, collaborate and listen Ice is back with my brand new invention Something grabs a hold of me tightly Then I flow like a harpoon daily and nightly Will it ever stop? yo -- I don't know Turn off the lights and I'll glow To the extreme I rock a mic like a vandal Light up a stage and wax a chump like a candle. 3) The song has stood the test of time, where even today its message is still relevant to today's youth. If I hear it on the radio today, my body starts swaying uncontrobably to the beat of the song. If there's room, I'll break out into the Running Man. It still sounds as fresh today as it did when I first heard it through the radio. All of a sudden, I finally understood the possibiltes of rap music and what it could do as the song transported me to the gritty world of the streets as a young white man struggles to fight the power. Even his more commercial work, 'Go, Ninja, Go' on the  Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2: Secrets of the Ooze soundtrack has a certain undeniable charm and je ne sais quoi. Sure, his work is unappreciated today and he's no longer 'cool'. But, there are anonymous fans out there, patiently waiting for the return of Vanilla Ice. The Iceman will cometh.. People better recognize that without Vanilla, there would be no rap music as we know it today. And, yes, I also appreciate the songs of Milli Vanilli. Who cares who sung what? They're still great love songs; I can't think of any better pop songs since then. Nobody will still play or sing the songs of Britney or Christina 20+ years from now. The only reason people will remember their names as those two women compete to act the raunchiest- Penthouse, sex tapes, etc.. But, we still fondly remember the soothing melodies of "Don't Blame it on the Rain".
Um, no comment. koji
post #17 of 32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thracozaag,June 11 2005,06:01
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Originally Posted by esquire.,June 11 2005,04:03
I watched the last one just to check out Vanilla Ice, who doesn't get the respect he deserves. Years from now, historians will recognize how important and integral he was in the rap movement music. Without him, there would be no Eminem today. I still love his eponymous anthem 'Ice, Ice Baby' and crank it up whenever I hear it.
Good god, I hope you're joking. koji
Why do you think I am joking? 'Ice, Ice Baby' has all the qualities of a great song. 1) Infectious beat and sound. They took a great beat, from David Bowie and Queen's song 'Under Pressure', and took it to the next level to the panthenon of one of the greatest beats of all time. That little 'ting' at the end made all the difference. 2) Great Lyrics. Vanilla Ice was not just frontin' when he proclaimed 'Take heed, ?cause I?m a lyrical poet'. We haven't seen such beautiful lyrics since the rise of Rakim: Ice ice baby, ice ice baby All right stop, collaborate and listen Ice is back with my brand new invention Something grabs a hold of me tightly Then I flow like a harpoon daily and nightly Will it ever stop? yo -- I don?t know Turn off the lights and I?ll glow To the extreme I rock a mic like a vandal Light up a stage and wax a chump like a candle. 3) The song has stood the test of time, where even today its message is still relevant to today's youth. If I hear it on the radio today, my body starts swaying uncontrobably to the beat of the song. If there's room, I'll break out into the Running Man. It still sounds as fresh today as it did when I first heard it through the radio. All of a sudden, I finally understood the possibiltes of rap music and what it could do as the song transported me to the gritty world of the streets as a young white man struggles to fight the power. Even his more commercial work, 'Go, Ninja, Go' on the  Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2: Secrets of the Ooze soundtrack has a certain undeniable charm and je ne sais quoi. Sure, his work is unappreciated today and he's no longer 'cool'. But, there are anonymous fans out there, patiently waiting for the return of Vanilla Ice. The Iceman will cometh.. People better recognize that without Vanilla, there would be no rap music as we know it today. And, yes, I also appreciate the songs of Milli Vanilli. Who cares who sung what? They're still great love songs; I can't think of any better pop songs since then. Nobody will still play or sing the songs of Britney or Christina 20+ years from now. The only reason people will remember their names as those two women compete to act the raunchiest- Penthouse, sex tapes, etc.. But, we still fondly remember the soothing melodies of "Don't Blame it on the Rain".
you need to lay it on a little thicker... ***edit: why did i too quote the whole post...
post #18 of 32
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Milli Vanilli
Now there is a piece of history that I never understood... why did they have to lipsynch the music... who was the actual writer/performer of the song that won the award and why didnt they just perform as well?
post #19 of 32
Esquire: I agree in toto. Don't foget too, to credit Ice with a quality that rivals Chuck D., that of enjambment. Very few lyrics in pop music contain such a quality. My only criticism of your post is that you didn't cite the whole song.
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Quote:
(Thracozaag @ June 11 2005,06:01)
Quote:
Originally Posted by esquire.,June 11 2005,04:03
I watched the last one just to check out Vanilla Ice, who doesn't get the respect he deserves. Years from now, historians will recognize how important and integral he was in the rap movement music. Without him, there would be no Eminem today. I still love his eponymous anthem 'Ice, Ice Baby' and crank it up whenever I hear it.
Good god, I hope you're joking. koji
Why do you think I am joking? 'Ice, Ice Baby' has all the qualities of a great song. (snip Batemanesque soliloquiy about Vanilla Ice)
You post this and fail to see the humor in American Psycho.
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Esquire: I agree in toto.  Don't foget too, to credit Ice with a quality that rivals Chuck D., that of enjambment.  Very few lyrics in pop music contain such a quality.  My only criticism of your post is that you didn't cite the whole song.
who said anything about "Toto"?
post #22 of 32
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(Horace @ June 12 2005,04:29) Esquire: I agree in toto.  Don't foget too, to credit Ice with a quality that rivals Chuck D., that of enjambment.  Very few lyrics in pop music contain such a quality.  My only criticism of your post is that you didn't cite the whole song.
who said anything about "Toto"?
I'm afraid I did. Do you care to expound upon their genius?
post #23 of 32
all i can say is, who doesn't miss the rains down in africa? you know? also, it was many years before i learned that rosanna was written for/about rosanna arquette. keep that one on file for jeopardy.
post #24 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
all i can say is, who doesn't miss the rains down in africa? you know? also, it was many years before i learned that rosanna was written for/about rosanna arquette. keep that one on file for jeopardy.
I didn't know that. I hope somebody got a really nice reward for writtign that song
post #25 of 32
Ummm, who are all these bands again?? With regards to Ryan Seacrest, he's got his own hollywood star already.
post #26 of 32
proving once and for all that the sidewalk stars are now meaningless.
post #27 of 32
Faustian, Wrong album. All true Toto fans find that album inferior to their previous, modern day classic albums. A song like 'Pamela' just isn't on the same level as 'Rosanna' or 'Rain in Africa'. I think its sad that we don't give the respect to bands like Toto, Journey, or Air Supply. Without Steve Perry, then its just not the real Journey. That would make an AWESOME bands reunited. The problem is that people don't truly appreciate how difficult it is to create a great Pop song. Its like the Academy Awards which almost never gives out Best Picture Awards to comedies or gives out acting awards to comedic roles. That's why somebody like Cary Grant was shut out. But, actually, to do a good romantic comedy is even harder than making a effective melodrama. There has to be a studied carelessness in the whole thing, where you want to give an impression of effortlessness and not trying too hard even though you really are. Does anybody miss the vinyl records? It had a certain organic sound that's just missing in the sterile sounds from the cd player.
post #28 of 32
esquire: I had some of Toto's stuff on tape because at the time, I liked them. I grew very tired of them fast and taped over it. Not fond of Air Supply either. However, I have yet to grow tired of Journey. The City (or Lights) remains one of the best tributes to SF. Right there with Bennett's.
post #29 of 32
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(faustian bargain @ June 12 2005,21:29)
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Originally Posted by Horace,June 12 2005,04:29
Esquire: I agree in toto.  Don't foget too, to credit Ice with a quality that rivals Chuck D., that of enjambment.  Very few lyrics in pop music contain such a quality.  My only criticism of your post is that you didn't cite the whole song.
who said anything about "Toto"?
I'm afraid I did.  Do you care to expound upon their genius?
Horace, Since you asked, this is for you. Bob Dylan's lyrics are often held up as pieces of poetry. But, Toto's lyrics are just as literate and deep as anything as Dylan put out. Here's my interpretation of Toto's 'Rain in Africa': You have a couple who've separated. Their relationship had reached the two year mark, where the woman starts questioning where the relationship is headed and starts broadly hinting about marriage. The guy couldn't handle it, and just wanted things to be the same. So, he runs off to Africa to discover himself, to find out what he really wants. "I hear the drums echoing tonight But she hears only whispers of some quiet conversation She's coming in 12:30 flight The moonlit wings reflect the stars that guide me towards salvation" The girlfriend is coming to Africa on a long, overseas flight to lay down the ultimatium: either Africa or her. Drums symbolize conflict, as well as the guy's beating heart. This is juxtaposed to the woman in the plane: a sterile environment with hundreds of strangers, few speaking to one another, and only in quiet conversation. "I stopped an old man along the way Hoping to find some long forgotten words or ancient melodies He turned to me as if to say, hurry boy, it's waiting there for you" This Old Man is a personification of Africa and the untamed wildness it represents. Before he meets his girlfriend, he's taking a time out and asking himself if he's discovered everything he could. And, Africa, is telling him he hasn't even scratched the surface. Its not too late to turn back. If he did, he could finally find the wisdom he's been looking for in Africa. "Chorus: It's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you There's nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do I bless the rains down in africa Gonna take some time to do the things we never had" The young man's answer is that nothing will stop him from meeting his girlfriend again. The rain symbolizes cleansing and rebirth. He's realized how much he's missed her now when she was gone. He's become a new man, ready to make the commitment and sacrifices that he was not willing to do earlier in the relationship. "The wild dogs cry out in the night As they grow restless longing for some solitary company I know that I must do what's right Sure as kilimanjaro rises like olympus above the serengeti I seek to cure what's deep inside, frightened of this thing that I've become" The wild dogs symbolize him, away from the civilizing influence of a woman. In Africa, he finally he had the freedom he thought he always wanted. But, he only found loneliness and misery. He's scared that this is his future and life. "Chorus (instrumental break) Hurry boy, she's waiting there for you" Notice, that 'it, Africa, has now changed to she, the woman. She's at the airport, and he's rushing to meet her. "It's gonna take a lot to drag me away from you There's nothing that a hundred men or more could ever do I bless the rains down in africa, I bless the rains down in africa I bless the rains down in africa, I bless the rains down in africa I bless the rains down in africa Gonna take some time to do the things we never had" Again, this is just reinforcing the earlier themes of the song. Once he was gone from her, he finally realized how much he missed her. Now, nothing will ever keep them apart and he's going to make all the sacrifices he was never willing to do before. Or, this song is just about a guy who comes to Africa, gets bitten by some wild dogs, and now has become a were-man. And, only the love of his sweetheart can save him from being a were-man.
post #30 of 32
"bless the rains..." ...oh man, that's one of my longest-held misinterpretations of lyrics busted right there. i guess it pays to read liner notes. not that i ever owned any Toto albums. but my high school band played that song for its 'senior concert' more than once, if i remember correctly. i guess the band director liked that song. --- agreed re. the lack of respect for well-crafted pop tunes. i think Journey was one of the great groups in that regard. Plus, they had an Atari game made out of their 'Escape' album.. air supply, while being part of my junior high consciousness, just doesn't rank high enough in my esteem. maybe i think they cross the threshold of sappiness.
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