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Help with a Kosher dinner - Page 2

post #16 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaogou View Post
I will get in touch with a local deli about meat on Monday.

You need to contact a kosher butcher about raw meat not a deli which sells smoked and/or cooked meat.

Also some supermarkets may carry packaged kosher meat.
post #17 of 57
Forget all the hassle and try to get kosher catering.

Trying to cook Kosher, real kosher, at your house is way way difficult.

To be authentic you need new untouched sets of cooking utensils etc, not to mention the raw ingredients.

Spent some money for the event, not worth the hassle.
post #18 of 57
Is anyone familiar with Kashruth slaughter procedures? I've always been curious if reciting the name of God is a necessity when slaughtering the animal, since each animal is done in by hand.
post #19 of 57
You can't use new china out of the box. It needs to undergo a dunk in a ritual bath in order to "kosher" it.

Stay with disposable plates, much easier.
post #20 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
My guess is that he doesn't really care or he wouldn't be eating at your house, at least not without telling you exactly what his requirements are beforehand.

Bingo.

He probably meant simply for you to avoid pork and maybe also non-kosher meat. He would have never accepted an invitation from a gentile with the assumption that you would get all new china and utensils for him. There's just no way.

If you stick to fish and vegetables or simply buy kosher beef (I think you can get it delivered from kosher.com?), you'll be fine. To be sure, don't use dairy with meat (e.g. replace butter with margarine, etc...) and have a fruit based dessert
post #21 of 57
I can't imagine anybody, jewish or not, imposing so much on a dinner invitation. Surely he just meant avoid the big rules.
post #22 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdangio View Post
I'm baffled by how eating chicken/turkey and cheese is against the rules. Isn't the dairy/meat rule there to prevent someone from eating the milk of the mother with the flesh of the child? Last time I checked, and I check pretty frequently, I couldn't milk a chicken. (I won't even go into the odds of you winding up with milk/cheese of a mother and child of the same mother in today's world).

This is a tricky one. I believe the answer is that halachically you can in fact eat poultry including chicken with milk as it's not a milking animal. But, the rabbis as a precaution out of fear that the practice of mixing meat-like foods with milk could lead to total abandonment of the milk/meat mixing rules still prohibited it anyway. Sort of like building a fence a few feet back from the swimming pool instead of right along the edge...

The simple fact is there is no clear answer for why not to mix meat and milk. It's just said that that's what you do. There are theories and speculation however... some examples:
- It's cleaner/healthier somehow. More natural.
- Symbolically the blood is death and the milk is life, so mixing them is a bad idea.
- It's important to have restrictions of any sort really (arbitrarily) as it teaches us self-discipline,
etc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by dopey View Post
My guess is that he doesn't really care or he wouldn't be eating at your house, at least not without telling you exactly what his requirements are beforehand.

Then again... This is probably the case. I'd suggest asking him so as to avoid embarrassment for both sides.

Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter View Post
seriously, if he actually meant that you should serve him a kosher meal, then you need to get catering and serve it on disposible plates. I have a lot of observant friends, and they would never eat anything that I cooked in my house, probrably not even coffee. if he meant "don't serve me pork" that is another thing. what kind of rabbi is he?

More information can be found here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosher
post #23 of 57
Thread Starter 
I am in luck. Lobel's has Kosher beef. I talked to the Rabbi and he told me to do the best I can. As a few here said, he is just concerned about the big stuff.

That said, the first course will be a spicy papaya salad.
2nd course is a very small bowl of pho.
3rd course is porterhouse steak.
4th course is Fennel-stuffed John Dory wrapped in black raddish with fennel broth.
5th course is dessert and still undecided...
post #24 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xiaogou View Post
I am in luck. Lobel's has Kosher beef. I talked to the Rabbi and he told me to do the best I can. As a few here said, he is just concerned about the big stuff.

That said, the first course will be a spicy papaya salad.
2nd course is a very small bowl of pho.
3rd course is porterhouse steak.
4th course is Fennel-stuffed John Dory wrapped in black raddish with fennel broth.
5th course is dessert and still undecided...

cool, the important thing was to talk to him and understand what he meant. sounds like a good meal. have fun
post #25 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermitedge View Post
Is anyone familiar with Kashruth slaughter procedures? I've always been curious if reciting the name of God is a necessity when slaughtering the animal, since each animal is done in by hand.
Since the name of G-d is never uttered, that would be a no. I'm sure there is an appropriate prayer of thanksgiving before the kill, but I'm not hip to it. I'm not an expert on the process of the Shochet (ritual slaughterer), but I can shed some light on kosher beef: 1> The animal must be raised kosher, meaning it is a kosher animal (Cloven feet, chews its cud) and it is fed only kosher food (mother's milk and grains) 2> The animal must be healthy before it is killed. All the organs are inspected after the slaughter to ensure there was no disease present. 3> The animal is killed in a humane fashion, by slitting its throat so that it dies instantly. 4> The blood is not kosher, and neither are any major arteries or the sciatic nerve. Because of that, the rear half of the animal is not kosher (removing the nerve and arteries would ruin a Sirloin or rump cut. Those cuts are sold to trayf butchers. 5> The meat is then salted to remove the rest of the blood. I believe dry-aging provides the same benefit. If the meat is not salted, then it must be cooked well-done. 6> You must also shecht poultry, but not fish.
post #26 of 57
Man, that must suck. The sirloin and rump are two great cuts of meat.

Add to that not being able to eat bacon (or most forms of pork) or shellfish (shrimp, oysters, lobster, etc) and being kosher would limit me from many foods I like.

Salt beef sandwiches and knishes will only make up for so much.

K
post #27 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoRon View Post
Since the name of G-d is never uttered, that would be a no. I'm sure there is an appropriate prayer of thanksgiving before the kill, but I'm not hip to it.

I'm not an expert on the process of the Shochet (ritual slaughterer), but I can shed some light on kosher beef:

1> The animal must be raised kosher, meaning it is a kosher animal (Cloven feet, chews its cud) and it is fed only kosher food (mother's milk and grains)

2> The animal must be healthy before it is killed. All the organs are inspected after the slaughter to ensure there was no disease present.

3> The animal is killed in a humane fashion, by slitting its throat so that it dies instantly.

4> The blood is not kosher, and neither are any major arteries or the sciatic nerve. Because of that, the rear half of the animal is not kosher (removing the nerve and arteries would ruin a Sirloin or rump cut. Those cuts are sold to trayf butchers.

5> The meat is then salted to remove the rest of the blood. I believe dry-aging provides the same benefit. If the meat is not salted, then it must be cooked well-done.

6> You must also shecht poultry, but not fish.

Thanks for clarifying. I'm pm'ing you a question, so check that out when you get a chance.
post #28 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post
He was probably joking with you. You have a very slim chance of making a five course meal, and not breaking one rule of Kosher or another.

For instance, it sounds like this will be a meat meal. This means there can be no dairy, and no utensil, plate, or silverware can have touched dairy. Ever. Some items can be "koshered" and some can't, such as normal plates. Prep areas should be separate for meat and dairy also.

There's much more to Kosher, than simply buying a bunch of Kosher certified ingredients.

I agree. If it is truely kosher it needs to have dairy and meats not touching, including pots, pans, plates. Also all the ingredients wil have to be kosher. Usually there will be 2 kitchens, to prepare separate courses. Also, DO NOT make it for a friday afternoon as it is their passover.

IMO try your best and I'm sure he will take that into consideration.

Easiest thing to do, tell him that plans have changed and invite yourself over to his house. I'm only kidding.
post #29 of 57
Quote:
Originally Posted by CityConnection View Post
I agree. If it is truely kosher it needs to have dairy and meats not touching, including pots, pans, plates. Also all the ingredients wil have to be kosher. Usually there will be 2 kitchens, to prepare separate courses. Also, DO NOT make it for a friday afternoon as it is their passover.

IMO try your best and I'm sure he will take that into consideration.

Easiest thing to do, tell him that plans have changed and invite yourself over to his house. I'm only kidding.

You need to do more than separate meat and dairy courses. You need to wait 4-6 hours between each. And Passover is an annual event, not a weekly Friday evening one.

Btw, "their passover"? Who else has one?
post #30 of 57
Steps for easy Kosher meal: 1) Find Kosher deli 2) Order 2lb Pastrami, 2lb Corned Beef, several Latkas, 1 rye bread, some deli-style salad that they sell in the case, some Kosher dill pickles, and some Rugulah/pound cake for desert. Manishevitz and Kosher Coke/Diet Coke. Don't forget condiments. 3) Get plates and disposable utensils from the deli. (can a wine glass be non-kosher?) 4) Set up a spread at your table. 5) Sit back and relax. In and out for under $60.
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