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Trousers lining

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
What fabric is used for the lining of trousers ? what are the criteria in the choice of this fabric? Mathieu
post #2 of 26
Quote:
What fabric is used for the lining of trousers ? what are the criteria in the choice of this fabric? Mathieu
I'd like to know answer to this question too. Looks like I've got silk (or Bemberg) on some heavy flannels and on tropical weight MTM southwicks something that isn't "silky" feeling but very lightweight none-the-less. Something more like a cheesecloth (though not really -- forgive the poverty of my sartorial imagination).
post #3 of 26
All mine are lined with bemberg.  The thread on unlined Oxxford trousers explained a lot of the rationale behind lining trousers. http://66.170.193.77/cgi-bin....+lining dan
post #4 of 26
Most trousers are lined because the outer fabric will feel abrasive against the skin otherwise. Heavier flannels and tweeds in particular.
post #5 of 26
in addition it lessens the effects of wear on the knees and thighs (of the trousers). this being the location that gets strained when sitting.
post #6 of 26
The outer fabric slides over the lining so it is less likely to bag at the knee from stretching.
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
My question was more about the choice of fabric. If it's been decided that the trousers would be lined then which fabric is used for the lining? Why acetate and not linen or cotton for instance?
post #8 of 26
Linen and cotton would be innapropriate lining materials because linings are supposed to be smooth and "slippery". Using cotton or linen would be totally against common sense in this regard. It would be like lining your pants with fine gauge sandpaper. Acetate, however, might work, who knows.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Linen and cotton would be innapropriate lining materials because linings are supposed to be smooth and "slippery".  Using cotton or linen would be totally against common sense in this regard.  It would be like lining your pants with fine gauge sandpaper.  Acetate, however, might work, who knows.
Why do you question acetate? Anything about the material's function? I just checked an old Press suit's trousers that I had lined to the knee. It looks like a material that is natural, and very similar to what trouser makers use for pockets and waistband. Maybe it's cheap or maybe it's not the best thing to use, but I've never really noticed it to be non-functional or a bother....In fact, never noticed it at all really until reading this forum. But such perhaps is the case with a lot of matters sartorial.
post #10 of 26
Bemberg is best, I think. It is smooth, allowing the knees to glide more easily. It is not as hot as silk. It is more durable than silk. And it is cheaper; thus when it does wear out at the knees (as it inevitably will) it is cheaper to replace.
post #11 of 26
How much does it cost to get pants re-lined? I mean the whole thing, inlcuding the band, pockets, etc.? Thanks.
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Bemberg is best, I think.
Manton, is Bemberg made from rayon?
post #13 of 26
I recently had some trousers made that are lined in the front and back.  Anyone ever heard of lining in both the front and back?
post #14 of 26
Quote:
I recently had some trousers made that are lined in the front and back.  Anyone ever heard of lining in both the front and back?
Almost all women's trousers are fully lined - front and back, from waist to cuff. I've often wondered why men's aren't. The only thing I could come up with is that men tend to run a little "hotter" (body temp), and perhaps would find the full lining too warm?? I haven't any idea, really. I'm just speculating. Personally, I like the full lining.
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Almost all women's trousers are fully lined - front and back, from waist to cuff.
Lining in front down to the knee is really the useful part. Full lining just changes the feel because only the lining is against your skin. So if you like the lining fabric better full lining is good, otherwise you can do without. Mathieu
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