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Polo showdown - Page 2

post #16 of 51
Fred Perry is hard to find...in NYC???? sure you looked hard enough? Macy's, Bloomingdales, Urban Outfitters...all carry a wide selection. and then there's your local subculture store(s) abundant in NYC that still stocks Freds for the mod/skin crowd good vintage Freds made in UK with 3 buttons are hard to find....we used to scour old rundown looking tennis shops to find the best deadstock vintage Freds, way back when the only way to get em was to order from UK through Shelly's or Merc
post #17 of 51
i am wearing a brooks brothers golden fleece polo. i think it's neat because the logo looks like a hog hanging from a ribbon. (or, a flying pig.) i have heard good things about john smedley polos. i would like to try one someday. /andrew
post #18 of 51
I personally hate logos. I prefer RL Purple Label polos which don't have the pony and are often NWT on Ebay for less than $50.
post #19 of 51
Quote:
Here's my vote - all three brands suck.  Polo does have some nice tailored clothing in its more expensive ranges, but that is for another forum.
Holla.
post #20 of 51
I've been wearing RL Polo pique knits for almost 10 years (and I'm still in my early 20's...) and they've never failed me. Recently I was given a Lacoste polo as a present, and the fit is quite snug, but overall quality feels about the same as the Polo. If I were to pick one 'gotta have' polo shirt, it'd probably be the Comme des Garcons/Fred Perry shirts sold retail around $250 here in Tokyo... don't think I'm going to get one. Also, I'm completely lost on this, so: What gets altered when you tailor a polo shirt? I doubt it's sleeve length (we're talking short sleeves here), so I'm assuming it's the 'body' of the shirt? Unlike a dress shirt, you can't really just make darts to adjust, so does the tailor actually take apart the shirt, cut out fabric, and sew it back together?? How much does this cost?
post #21 of 51
(non-logoed) designer polos are nice if you want to cut a different look - plus the fabrics are usually better.
post #22 of 51
Quote:
Here's my vote - all three brands suck.  Polo does have some nice tailored clothing in its more expensive ranges, but that is for another forum.
I second this. They're about as mediocre and ubiquitous as pleated khakis. Everyone fat middle-aged man in the developing world wears a fake lacoste or rl and aspires to own a real one. The rich fat guys in BMWs own the real thing. It's too bad that they became cool and hip a few years back. I know they're a staple and there are all these lovely colors and you can have them slim and fitted and wear them with premium jeans. Frankly, I find that look boring too. The word "polo" has started to make me sick. This is no offense to the ineffably admirable Ralph and probably a tribute to his tedius brilliance, but half the clothing brands in China have incorporated the word into their name. Sorry, but when you are surrounded with brands like "E. Z. Polo Boss" "C. Sport Polo" and "Big Boss" you get tired of these things. Of course the pirates are to blame for my brand sickness. But there are too many people in Polos in the States, too.
post #23 of 51
Thread Starter 
I usually get the sides of my polos taken in (slimming the body), the length shortened (I like to show off the belt), the shoulders taken in (I have girly sloping shoulders) and sometimes the sleeves shortened and slimmed (reducing the circumference of the sleeve opening). Most alterations shops, in fact, will refuse to do polos because they're knit. A few vintage shops in town (Austin, TX) have started offering a service of altering items that you buy there for a nominal fee. Edge charges only $3 per polo even if you get "the works" done. Cream charges about $5-10 depending on how much work. These are ridiculously good prices and are worth every penny. Of course, the service is intended as a way to sell their clothes so you can't exactly bring in items that you bought elsewhere -- certainly not ethically. I, however, rely on a friend of mine who is a fashion and textiles major at the University of Texas. She does alterations for me for cheap and has access to professional equipment -- I've seen a multi-thousand dollar iron whose functionality I can't even fathom. Apparently a special sewing machine is needed to properly stitch knit items like polo shirts. The vintage stores only use standard equipment and I sometimes pop some of the threading putting on or taking off the shirts. Does anyone else get their polos altered and would like to chime in? I don't think it's a very common procedure as most people don't much effort into their "casualwear" and it takes a bit of work to find someone to do it for cheap -- if at all. I think it's a great idea, especially when you have a thin frame. Take out an ad with your local university's fashion design department; you're bound to find cheap labor. I'm getting my friend to do my entire wardrobe at a fraction of what an alteration shop would charge.
post #24 of 51
I love Fred Perry because the logo isn't too over the top. I was lucky enough to find three at a thrift shop here in the UK for CHEAP.
post #25 of 51
armand basi makes some interesting casual polos basco has some nice linen and silk knit wear ones both without logos
post #26 of 51
Quote:
Sorry, but when you are surrounded with brands like "E. Z. Polo Boss" "C. Sport Polo" and "Big Boss" you get tired of these things.  Of course the pirates are to blame for my brand sickness.  But there are too many people in Polos in the States, too.
But what do the pirates wear?.
post #27 of 51
somebody find that picture of the ruffley shirt...
post #28 of 51
Quote:
somebody find that picture of the ruffley shirt...
Jon.
post #29 of 51
Lacoste does not fit my body to well, especially my neck, they just seem to float there. I do like the RLPL polo's from a few years ago, which were slimmer and shorter (luckily I own 3), whereas the new versions are just a larger version of the regular RL Polo, polo shirts. I personally own over 15 RL Polo shirts for the simple reason that they fit me best. I could care less about the logo. Logo, no logo, 50 logos, whatever the polo shirt has as long as it fits me. That's what separates us from the outside world: our clothes fit. Jon.
post #30 of 51
15 Polos? Man I bought two Polo's this season (Le Tigre, then Lacoste) and my GF said when buying the second "You already bought one of those last week.". I knew I wasn't crazy wanting to pick up a couple more Lacoste. I don't trust anyone with my fashion but I've always wondered how many of each type of item I should have. m
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