or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Letterman and Leno -Sleeves too darn long!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Letterman and Leno -Sleeves too darn long!

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
I cannot believe the tailors for Letterman and Leno let them go out there in front of millions of viewers with sleeves that are too long on their suits. Last night Letterman wore a very sharp single breasted,peaked lapel suit which looked very nice throughout the shoulders and chest,with a very flattering lapel.In all respects,it was an otherwise first class suit,which failed miserably in the sleeve length.Unless he bent his arms, there was no sleeve visible whatsoever.In fact,instead of 1/2" showing,I think they were 1/2" under the jacket sleeve.Shame on you,Corvito. Then I flipped to Leno,and same thing.Long sleeves-Aaargh.
post #2 of 22
In the last week, not counting salesman at clothing stores, I've seen one other person showing shirt sleeves under the suit coat. This has to be the most common fashion rule-break.
post #3 of 22
It's probably common because the salesmen fitting these poor people don't know any better. And if it's the case of Letterman's tailor, it's probably Letterman who's insisting that his sleeves be that way. I dunno. But yeah it makes my brain bleed to see this.
post #4 of 22
There are actually three really good reasons for this, I think: (1) I think that Italians generally wear their sleeves longer than Flusserians and the English. Just my sense. (2) Letterman wears very snug shirt cuffs. He is likely wearing his coat sleeves properly, but his shirt cuffs are just too snug to fall to the correct length. Pay close attention and you'll see I might be right. (3) In terms of regular guys, it is true that a lot of them don't know any better. But a good proportion probably do know better but don't want to spend the money shortening their sleeves, which is a $35 to $40 alteration, and one that you really need a competent tailor to do (I've seen some appalling work done on sleeves by dry cleaners). I seriously doubt any man buys an OTR coat with well fitting sleeves and then takes it to the tailor with instructions to make them longer.
post #5 of 22
Quote:
There are actually three really good reasons for this, I think: (1) I think that Italians generally wear their sleeves longer than Flusserians and the English.  Just my sense. (2) Letterman wears very snug shirt cuffs.  He is likely wearing his coat sleeves properly, but his shirt cuffs are just too snug to fall to the correct length.  Pay close attention and you'll see I might be right. (3)  In terms of regular guys, it is true that a lot of them don't know any better.  But a good proportion probably do know better but don't want to spend the money shortening their sleeves, which is a $35 to $40 alteration, and one that you really need a competent tailor to do (I've seen some appalling work done on sleeves by dry cleaners).  I seriously doubt any man buys an OTR coat with well fitting sleeves and then takes it to the tailor with instructions to make them longer.
I was at the tailor's shop today.  He's an elderly Italian gentleman, 86 years old, poor health, and can bitch about anything - in full color.  Anyway, while bragging about what a wonderful job he had done on a particularly difficult jacket for me, and complaining about my attention to detail (which I pay for), he recounted this tale. Guy comes in with some pants.  Well known, very wealthy.  Trouser pockets are too short - can they be fixed? OK.  Replace pockets $20.  Or . . . Tip the pockets - simply add something on the bottom - $5.00. Guy says to Tip them. On the way out of the store, he turns with a thought. "Just do the right side, I never use the left." Following that story, I got the update on the University Prof who did not want to pay the $60 to have the collar shortened.  Reportedly had a 3/4 inch gap at the neck in a custom made "Indian Tailor" suit - however that translates from Italian.  So, here is a Sweedish guy, Internationaly Traveling University Prof, who has the problem pointed out to him.  Response - "Money Doesn't grow on Trees."  His internationally tailored suit will make him appear to be a smuck and he either does not understand or does not care.   Some of the finer details of fit are a bit subtle.  A big gap or roll behind the collar is something any dumb butt can see.  It is not a mater of preference of shoulder style, waist supression, flair of the skirt, button placement, or stiffness of the chest piece.  That man does not want to pay $60 to make it look better.  The cost of a few cocktails at some moderately swankey NYC bubble bar.  Amazing.
post #6 of 22
I think the main problem is that salesmen at US stores (even high-end ones) don't follow this rule. Believe it or not, I had one of the senior tailors at Barney's argue with me for a good 20 minutes that the jacket sleeve should cover the shirt cuff.. Panzer
post #7 of 22
Quote:
I think the main problem is that salesmen at US stores (even high-end ones) don't follow this rule. Believe it or not, I had one of the senior tailors at Barney's argue with me for a good 20 minutes that the jacket sleeve should cover the shirt cuff.. Panzer
Not surprising. In the case of most salespeople in clothing stores it's hard to have others follow rules when you don't follow / know the rules yourself. And even if you do, you personally dislike them and your dislike is forced upon others. Case in point: I know a sales person at a high-end clothing store on Worth Ave. that does not like the shirt cuff to show past the jacket sleeve, and thus he imposes his views on the customers, who do not know any better. Stores, which carry Flusser books (or other clothing books), should force the salespeople to read the books in order for them to work on the sales floor with at least some knowledge of what they are selling. Jon.
post #8 of 22
I'm only a part-timer at my new clothing salesman job, so I'm not in a position to mark people for alterations, but I did get a chance to watch our training video for fitters. Their "perfect fit" showed jacket sleeves covering the shirt sleeves. I commented to a fellow new employee (a veteran salesman who has worked in various other low-mid range department stores, though not a clothing afficionado) on this issue, and he just told me that's how they all the other stores had taught him to do it as well. I've had this problem getting alterations myself even at fairly respected/experienced tailoring shops who should know better, and I really don't get why this practice seems to be the mainstream. Also one thing to consider is that your average man is very adverse to spending a lot of money on clothing and will view extensive alterations as sort of an unnecessary markup ala a warranty at Best Buy or add-on's at the car dealership, especially since standard alteration costs look more significant in proportion to the price of a cheap $300 suit on sale. Likewise, I'd bet that a lot of stores or alterations shops out there might feel reluctant to do more alterations (especially if a customer doesn't know or care better), since that translates to more labor and liability, so it could go both ways.
post #9 of 22
Quote:
I'm only a part-timer at my new clothing salesman job, so I'm not in a position to mark people for alterations, but I did get a chance to watch our training video for fitters. Their "perfect fit" showed jacket sleeves covering the shirt sleeves. I commented to a fellow new employee (a veteran salesman who has worked in various other low-mid range department stores, though not a clothing afficionado) on this issue, and he just told me that's how they all the other stores had taught him to do it as well. I've had this problem getting alterations myself even at fairly respected/experienced tailoring shops who should know better, and I really don't get why this practice seems to be the mainstream. Also one thing to consider is that your average man is very adverse to spending a lot of money on clothing and will view extensive alterations as sort of an unnecessary markup ala a warranty at Best Buy or add-on's at the car dealership, especially since standard alteration costs look more significant in proportion to the price of a cheap $300 suit on sale. Likewise, I'd bet that a lot of stores or alterations shops out there might feel reluctant to do more alterations (especially if a customer doesn't know or care better), since that translates to more labor and liability, so it could both ways.
I can only assume it is because the people at the top, i.e. the people that make the videos / instruction manuals / what have you are unfamiliar with what the correct length is, thus the contents of such training materials are flawed and incorrect. Jon.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
I can only assume it is because the people at the top, i.e. the people that make the videos / instruction manuals / what have you are unfamiliar with what the correct length is, thus the contents of such training materials are flawed and incorrect. Jon.
That's almost certainly the case. From, what I've been learning in the job hunting process, retail positions (and I imagine this is true across the board, not just clothes) are filled almost exclusively on the basis of seniority and resume experience. Nobody really seems to care about competence or field expertise, so long as you've "paid your dues" and thus won't offend the sensibilities of the less knowledgeable people who rode the seniority train to their positions.
post #11 of 22
The tailors at RL in NYC are adamant about sleeve length. I once heard the jovial older Italian tailor kindly showing the proper amount of cuff to a 30-something who had at first been against such a thing since all his suits from Barney's had sleeves covering shirt cuffs. The tailor and I shared a smile when the 30-something brought up Barney's.
post #12 of 22
Quote:
The tailors at RL in NYC are adamant about sleeve length. I once heard the jovial older Italian tailor kindly showing the proper amount of cuff to a 30-something who had at first been against such a thing since all his suits from Barney's had sleeves covering shirt cuffs. The tailor and I shared a smile when the 30-something brought up Barney's.
Which is truly amazing, seeing as Barney's carries Kiton. (I do recall a horror story or two regarding their tailoring, or should I say lack thereof?) Jon.
post #13 of 22
Louis Boston likes jacket sleeves and trouser legs to be too long. Messed up a MTM order with that little quirk-- utterly unexpected by me. The trousers are an easy fix-- but the jacket will require a little more care to deal with, as they drilled buttonholes into the sleeve. We can only hope that it "rides up with wear."
post #14 of 22
Barney's is by far the worst in this regard - I will never ever buy MTM from them again. The salesperson and tailor actually had me sign on the receipt that I specifically asked for the sleeves to be "extra short" as they did not want to be held liable by their bosses. Also, on their MTM program they only like to give you one fitting - when I asked for one of the vents to be properly laid, thus, requiring another fitting, they insisted that the busted vent was falling correctly and had the gall to point out that none of their customers ever needed more than one fitting and sugggested that I was simply being difficult. Panzer
post #15 of 22
Hmmm. Maybe we should all get Flusseronian short sleeve dress shirts and not worry about it?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Letterman and Leno -Sleeves too darn long!