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Pants rise?

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
I was wondering what the general rules are related to pants rise. I assume a shorter rise means a more modern look, correct? I saw some nice Incotex trousers from the informal line. The rise was 12.25 inches. Is that long? Too long? Is it like, old-manish? Or would that look OK on a late 30s early 40s guy for a casual elegant look?
post #2 of 31
Most suit trousers, from my measuring experience, are 12.5."  For example, your Isaia suit (you got one from STP, right?) should have a 12.5" rise.  I think a 12.25" Incotex rise would look perfectly fine with a dress shirt and blazer. If they are so informal as to be more like jeans, than it's probably not the best look.
post #3 of 31
Thread Starter 
Thanks JN3.  here they are for what it's worth.
post #4 of 31
Oh, those aren't "modern". Those are pretty classic (Incotex is a slim, but straight, leg, BTW). I think that the 12.25" right sounds about right. Would look very nice with a dress shirt and a blazer, among other things.
post #5 of 31
that's a bit expensive for a pair of pants which look very classic to me. Fabrics is nothing to fret about, colour is rather ugly, and this is quite a high rise. Not to mention it's made in portugal... I don't honestly see how these could retail at $375. .luc
post #6 of 31
Wha? (1) "COLOR IS UGLY" -- is a light khaki color. What's ugly about it? (2) "High rise" -- 12.25" is not a high rise for a pair of dress pants. I would argue that it is a perfect rise for this pair of pants for a guy in his 30s, especially if intended for wear with a blazer. (3) "Made in Portugal" -- Portugal makes some incredibly good pants; it is hardly third world labor, and nothing that Incotex puts its name on is poor quality. (4) "Fabric nothing to fret about" -- how can you know this without having touched it? Based on Incotex's track record, I'd say this is going to be a terrific fabric. (5) "130 a lot for a pair of pants" -- I disagree mightily here. It's a great price for a pair of Incotex.
post #7 of 31
This photos have a greenish cast to them. Notice how the carpet also has a green tint? I took one of the photos into Photoshop and corrected for the green cast. I bet that carpet is grey not green-grey. The trousers turned into a classic khaki/tan color. Since I don't know for sure that the carpet is actually a medium grey, don't blame me if I'm wrong. I bet the color is just fine.
post #8 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
This photos have a greenish cast to them. Notice how the carpet also has a green tint? I took one of the photos into Photoshop and corrected for the green cast. I bet that carpet is grey not green-grey. The trousers turned into a classic khaki/tan color. Since I don't know for sure that the carpet is actually a medium grey, don't blame me if I'm wrong. I bet the color is just fine.
Those pants are from Ian Daniels, so if he says they are beige you can probably take it to the bank.
post #9 of 31
If someone wanted less of a rise in something in quality comparable to that pair of Incotex, what would the options be? I'm rarely impressed by the quality of most designer labels.
post #10 of 31
I'd go directly to Jil Sander, Helmut Lang, and Costume National. Quality of the first two are higher than the last, and the prices are also slightly higher, but I prefer the slimmer styling of Costume. Helmut Lang is probably best if you are looking for something middle of the road.
post #11 of 31
Any reasoning behind a certain Neapolitan tailoring house cutting trousers with a 11" rise? For reference, is that a bit like hip-huggers? I've never noticed them to be so, although they don't rise as high as Chester Barrie trousers (RTW), or any Savile Row trousers I've seen, for that matter.
post #12 of 31
I've noticed some of the vintage Savile Row suits I own have a long or high rise,more like 12.5".Was this the norm for vintage?
post #13 of 31
Italians tend to prefer belts over suspenders, and this require lower rise trousers. Plus, the typical Southern Italian male is a bit on the short side, and his torso-to-leg ratio is closer to 1:1 rather than (say) 1:1.25.
post #14 of 31
Quote:
I've noticed some of the vintage Savile Row suits I own have a long or high rise,more like 12.5".Was this the norm for vintage?
I think it has less to do with when they were made than how they were made to be worn. Brace trousers need a higher rise. Belt trousers cut that high will just slip down; they need a slightly lower rise to stay in place.
post #15 of 31
Aha-I see.That's makes sense-they all have the buttons for braces inside.Thanks,Manton.
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