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Toe taps

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I have a brand new pair of Weymouths that are still in their shoe bags. Before I start wearing these beautiful shoes, I would like to fix some toe taps. What are the options that I have? Are they glued on, nailed on, etc?
post #2 of 9
I just had some put on a pair of Green's. They nail them on.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
What material are the taps made of? Rubber, steel, etc?
post #4 of 9
I don't know if any shoe service will insert a metal toepiece for you (maybe in Japan). What I would do instead of that crescent piece of metal is to get a bunch of toe brads instead
post #5 of 9
Any cobbler will nail on for you for 3 or 4 bucks a pair of black, hard plastic toe taps. Another option is just to have your cobbler nail in 6 or 8 nails/slugs at the top of the toe (as Vass and Lattanzi do, for example), but I've found these don't come close to the toe preservation of the hard plastic toe taps. If you want even more longevity to the protection, you can have your cobbler (or send them to C&J) install metal toe pieces, but this is a task that I don't think many cobblers know how to do.
post #6 of 9
Quote:
What material are the taps made of?  Rubber, steel, etc?
I got the black hard plastic taps that Kabert mentioned. It took my cobbler about 5 minutes to put them on and cost $8
post #7 of 9
Over on AA, there was a recent thread discussing the potential ill effects of having a cobbler apply a thin rubber sole (i.e., topy) to leather-soled shoes.  Potential problems noted with the use of thin rubber soles included the uppers wearing down quickly due to rolling tension, the drying up and cracking of the inner soles, and the rotting of the stitching, etc.  I suppose the latter 2 problems wouldn't happen with taps since the sole is minimally covered by the taps, but any thoughts on the uppers breaking down faster? Also, are there any forum members who use toe and/or heel taps in lieu of a full topy sole on their shoes?  I'd be interested to hear comments about the effectiveness of the rubber taps vs. a full topy sole.
post #8 of 9
Quote:
...If you want even more longevity to the protection, you can have your cobbler (or send them to C&J) install metal toe pieces, but this is a task that I don't think many cobblers know how to do.
I asked my cobbler about installing metal toe plates like those on a pair of JM Westons that I have. He told me he hadn't done this in years because no one has asked but that he could do it for me. He told me he didn't have the plates and would contact his supplier(s). A few days later, he gave me a call and said that he had no luck at all in locating the metal plates so he couldn't do it. By the way, he was referring to the metal plates that are embedded in the sole so that the surface of the plate is flush with that of the leather not the kind that rest on top of the sole.
post #9 of 9
i think the concerns about leather rotting etc. from rubber half soles are bogus. I've had them for years, and the leather is fine. Add leather half soles. Add hard plastic taps on both the toes and heels. Leather costs about $5. Taps another $10. Your shoe will last much longer -boston
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