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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 265

post #3961 of 4043
Thread Starter 

Here's the other thing to consider about a dog from working lines ... chances are you will get an average dog. No one will sell you the pick of a working litter. Or show litter for that matter. This is good. You want is a dog that's not too drivey or too dull, with identifiable drives that you can use to guide, control and train him.

 

Given the choice between an average working Vizsla that should be tractable and an average show Vizsla that may or may not be tractable, I know what I would choose.

 

lefty

post #3962 of 4043
Not sure where I was looking previously, but just discovered there's a wirehaired Vizsla breeder about 20 minutes from me. Have to start do some research.

edit - and another about an hour away.

http://www.northeastwirehairedvizslas.com/home.html

http://palownia.tripod.com/
post #3963 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcg View Post


Jan, re: the bolded - is it your opinion that an adult shelter dog is more of a crapshoot than a shelter pup? I've been thinking the opposite, so would be interested in hearing more if that's the case. If you're saying that an adult shelter dog is more of a crapshoot and a purebred from a reputable breeder (and the biggest question of all is a shelter pup), that makes sense to me.
Quote:
That said, I hope to always have a pit bull in the family. Love 'em.

I would say that an adult shelter dog is more of a crapshoot than a shelter puppy. A shelter puppy is most probably the product of an accidental or otherwise unwanted breeding, but with an adult dog you know nothing about its life experience or why it was turned over to the shelter. A lot of perfectly good dogs do end up in shelters for rotten reasons. On the other hand, many dogs are abandoned to shelters for bad behavior on their parts, which may or may not be capable of being corrected. Many of these behavioral problems may not be evident in a shelter environment. To my mind there are four cardinal sins in a dog: Owner aggression; other unwarranted human aggression (especially toward children!); inability to be housebroken; destructive chewing (beyond the puppy stage).

Were I adopting a Pit Bull, I would take one with the good old-fashioned, extroverted, exuberant, hail-fellow well-met Pit Bull temperament. He (or she) may be hell with other dogs and will probably be a lousy property guardian, but I can live with that. I'd even take one with fighting scars if I liked the temperament. With most of the mastiff breeds, a degree of genetic shyness is pretty much endemic. I don't like it in Pit Bulls, though. Interestingly, many game-bred Pit Bulls are quite shy. They have been bred exclusively for gameness and ability; shyness is immaterial as long as the dog is not human aggressive (a very undesirable trait in a fighting dog). During the Michael Vick case, it was claimed that some of the dogs had been so "traumatized" by their experiences in Vick's yard that they could not be adopted out. I suspect these highly bred fighting dogs were so genetically shy that they would have been equally fearful had Michael Vick and his henchmen been the kindliest men in the world.

I might tell here the story of my adoption of Tessa, the Tosa bitch who had been returned to her breeder because she had killed and eaten the neighbor's 100-pound Akita bitch. An extremely dog-wise friend who had owned several Tosas was worried about the cannibalism aspect. He advised me to spend a couple of hours with her before making a decision, also to put myself in a position of vulnerability by sitting down to see if that triggered any aggression from her. On the day I went down to Rick the breeder's place ("Everybody comes to Rick's Place."), Rick left Tessa alone with me in his exercise yard. The first thing she did was to roll over on her back so I could scratch her tummy. I then sat down to make myself vulnerable. She came up and licked my face all over. Then she lay down and snuggled up to me as close as she could and wouldn't budge. Do you think I took long to make up my mind? We were out of there in no time. Although I'm sure Rick would have let me have her for free, I gave him a nice folding knife and 350 rounds of 7x39mm Russian ammo as a token of gratitude.
post #3964 of 4043
Thread Starter 

Not sure how accurate this is, but interesting breed history. Rarity means an upcharge.

 

Quote:

The Wirehaired Vizsla was developed in the 1930s, initially by Vasas Jozsef, owner of the Csabai vizsla kennel along with Gresznarik Laszlo, who owned the de Selle German Wirehaired Pointer kennel. Their aim was to produce a dog that combined the color of the Vizsla with a heavier coat, and a more substantial frame, better suited for working in cold weather and retrieving from icy water.

Two Vizsla bitches (Zsuzsi and Csibi), both of whom combined excellent pedigrees with good working ability, were selected to breed with a totally liver colored German Wirehaired Pointer sire (Astor von Potat). Zsuzsi’s sire was known to have offspring with longer coats. The best of Zsuzsi’s and Csibi’s offspring were selected and bred together and Dia de Selle, the first WHV to be exhibited, was born. She had the same body as the shorthaired vizsla, but her head was the shape of the German Wirehaired Pointer. While her coat was not rough and thick enough, she was the promising beginning of the creation of the new breed.

Anecdotal history suggests the added infusion of PudelpointerBloodhound and Irish Setter blood during the period of the Second World War when many other Hungarian kennels became involved in the development of the breed. It has also previously, but incorrectly been suggested that the breed was created by backbreeding of smooth Vizsla's most heavily coated offspring (Gottlieb,idem).

There are approximately 400-450 Wirehaired Vizslas in the US and between 2,500 and 3,000 worldwide.[7]

 

lefty 

post #3965 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


I would say that an adult shelter dog is more of a crapshoot than a shelter puppy. A shelter puppy is most probably the product of an accidental or otherwise unwanted breeding, but with an adult dog you know nothing about its life experience or why it was turned over to the shelter. A lot of perfectly good dogs do end up in shelters for rotten reasons. On the other hand, many dogs are abandoned to shelters for bad behavior on their parts, which may or may not be capable of being corrected. Many of these behavioral problems may not be evident in a shelter environment. To my mind there are four cardinal sins in a dog: Owner aggression; other unwarranted human aggression (especially toward children!); inability to be housebroken; destructive chewing (beyond the puppy stage).

I've been thinking of it from the perspective that you have a better idea what you're ending up with by choosing an adult dog, in terms of temperament, size, and even breed (you can get a good laugh by reading the claimed "breeds" of many shelter dogs). That said, your line of reasoning makes sense. We're in no rush and the plan would be to take our time until we really find a dog that seems like a great match, but point taken regarding unwanted behavior that might not be evident at the shelter.

I think we may go with a breeder this time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Not sure how accurate this is, but interesting breed history. Rarity means an upcharge.

Yes, I have a slight preference for the wirehair, but the fiance is pushing for the standard Vizsla. Will have to see how much of an upcharge the wirehaired carries. There seems to be some variability in the length of hair, so there may be a compromise to be found.
post #3966 of 4043
Norbert is currently hunting flies. Fml.
post #3967 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

Norbert is currently hunting flies. Fml.
lol, happy thanksgiving Matt.
post #3968 of 4043
Today was a very bad day for me: I had to put down Cyrus, my magnificent all-black male Tosa. He had been lively and vigorous almost up to the end, but when he went off his food a couple of days ago, I became somewhat concerned. I made an appointment with a nearby vet and walked him the mile or so to vet's. He still seem fairly lively and alert, so I wasn't too worried. As it turned out, the diagnosis was Evan's Syndrome, which is a perfect storm of blood disorders. Treatment would have required an extensive course of hospitalization and blood transfusions, and there was a very high probability that he wouldn't make it anyway. I much preferred to have him leave this life while he was strong and proud, so I made the decision to have him put down at once. (I would have wanted the same for me!). He was a glorious creature--strong, beautiful (with multiple championships in All-Breed competitions), exuberant and joyous, and his joyful nature brought much joy into our lives. His passing has created a great void. Not sure at this time whether I want another dog.
post #3969 of 4043
oy, so sad.

wife's childhood dog, an Italian Greyhound, passed away i her sleep on Saturday night. 15 years old, it was time.
post #3970 of 4043
Sorry to hear it. We also put down our dog this morning (Dug the golden/lab mix). frown.gif His legs finally gave out on him over the weekend and we knew it was time to let him go.
post #3971 of 4043
Thread Starter 

Oyez à Beaumont.

 

Sorry, Jan, gomes, VD.

 

lefty

post #3972 of 4043
Jan, gomestar, VaderDave, very sorry to hear. My condolences to each of you.
post #3973 of 4043
I'm really sorry for all of you. Its always so hard when you let go of a pet.
post #3974 of 4043
Subscribed
post #3975 of 4043
Condolences to @JLibourel, @gomestarand @VaderDave - always very sad.
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