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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 263

post #3931 of 4043
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post


 

 

He looks like a happy little dude.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Connemara View Post

Any general thoughts on Great Danes, aside from the obvious issues with large breeds?

 

It's a lot of dog and the chances of finding a good one will be pretty low. Unless your heart is set on one, pass.

 

lefty

post #3932 of 4043
I'm not as down on Danes as lefty seems to be. I think there is no more beautiful, magnificent and regal dog than a good Dane. Unfortunately, most of the ones you see are gangly, gawky galoots, and there doesn't seem to be much in between.

As to temperament, typically they are sweet, gentle, friendly dogs. However, no few of them are complete psychos. One in my neighborhood wanted to attack my little Jessie when she was in heat. And I don't mean lustfully, which would have been perfectly normal, I mean viciously! Another, a big Harlequin wanted to attack Cyrus when he was a little puppy. I believe that may have been the same Great Dane that knocked an old lady down in our neighborhood. Nobody wants a psycho dog, but a psycho Dane is particularly alarming.

So I wouldn't veto getting a Dane. Just do your homework very carefully about health and temperament issues.

As a postscript, when I was boy, we had for a few years an older Great Dane bitch that had been found roaming in our neighborhood. She was just lovely dog. You couldn't have asked for a better companion animal.
post #3933 of 4043
Thread Starter 

I'm not saying they're poor dogs (aside from health), but Conne is a first-time dog owner (I believe) and a dane is physically a lot of dog. 

 

Conne, borrow one. Stuff it into your car and bring it home. Let it lay across your sofa and bed and check if there's room for you. Feed it and see how much water and food spills from its flews onto your new floors. If you're cool with that, start looking for one.

 

A friendly dane will get you laid like gangbusters. But that's true of a lot of dogs.

 

lefty 

post #3934 of 4043
If you want a huge dog that is regal and easy to live with, look at an Irish wolfhound. They are a great breed that lives well in so many environments.
post #3935 of 4043
Thread Starter 

Cool breed, but again, a lot of animal. People who want a giant breed really need to spend some up close and personal time with one before they decide.

 

lefty

post #3936 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Cool breed, but again, a lot of animal. People who want a giant breed really need to spend some up close and personal time with one before they decide.

lefty

...and be prepared for a very probable early death!
post #3937 of 4043
Thread Starter 

Here's an old clip of some rat hunters on Lord Howe Island in 1932. 

 

http://aso.gov.au/titles/documentaries/jewel-of-the-pacific/clip2/#

 

lefty

post #3938 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I adore our acd,but I don't know that I would actually suggest one to somebody. They are tough dogs, and smart, and beautiful. Their energy level is not super high. Great hiking companions and super loyal, but not exactly great for anything else. The real thing is that a well need acd really isn't a friendly dog. They have been kind of de-angriest by breeding, but since they are basically a show dog now, they have been de- a lot of thinged. As I said, ours is great, but he is very much old style. I don't like most I see.

Love vizslas. And standard poodles.

Seems that I keep coming back to the Vizsla.

The idea of a working dog sounds nice, but while we'll have a bit more space than the average suburban lot, want to be realistic as well. A (somewhat athletic) house dog will be more appropriate for us than a dog bred to work.

How does your ACD react to those outside your family?
post #3939 of 4043
If I may. I know we talk about specific breeds but I would also advise to visit your local shelter or a specific rescue to see if you can find your future dog there. For first time dog owners, acquiring an adult where you can estimate their temperment etc.... may be easier than acquiring a puppy and hoping they live up to their parents. I had a slew of purebreds and mutts throughout my lifetime and must say my current Baja Mexico thrown in the garbage pooch is the best dog that I've had.
post #3940 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by djblisk View Post

If I may. I know we talk about specific breeds but I would also advise to visit your local shelter or a specific rescue to see if you can find your future dog there. For first time dog owners, acquiring an adult where you can estimate their temperment etc.... may be easier than acquiring a puppy and hoping they live up to their parents. I had a slew of purebreds and mutts throughout my lifetime and must say my current Baja Mexico thrown in the garbage pooch is the best dog that I've had.

on a similar note, working with a rescue is very helpful as well. Most of them foster the dogs, so they often have a multi-month idea of the dog's temperament, exercise needs, likes, dislikes, overall disposition, etc. And most have enough dogs that you can pick and choose which one would be best with some input from the rescue on the individual dogs.

and I'll +1 on our pound dog. Incredibly well behaved dog from the very first minute (and already house broken). Will do again.
post #3941 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

...and be prepared for a very probable early death!

Amen
post #3942 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsstillmatt View Post

I don't like Aussies. 90% of border collies are neurotic messes. They are amazing dogs, and I love them, but ones who are bred to work aren't going to be satisfied with a tennis ball and a 3 mile run, and so many of the akc borders are soft and way too environmentally sensitive. An underused vizsla or gsp is going to be miles easier to live with.

Astute - working dogs need to work.
post #3943 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Here's an old clip of some rat hunters on Lord Howe Island in 1932. 

http://aso.gov.au/titles/documentaries/jewel-of-the-pacific/clip2/#

lefty

" So they can't be retailed." Nice.
post #3944 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by djblisk View Post

If I may. I know we talk about specific breeds but I would also advise to visit your local shelter or a specific rescue to see if you can find your future dog there. For first time dog owners, acquiring an adult where you can estimate their temperment etc.... may be easier than acquiring a puppy and hoping they live up to their parents. I had a slew of purebreds and mutts throughout my lifetime and must say my current Baja Mexico thrown in the garbage pooch is the best dog that I've had.

Not sure if directed to me or to Conne or just a general observation.

I currently have a 7 year old pit bull "mix" who was a shelter dog. I adopted her at 4 months, and she's a fantastic dog in just about every way. I say "just about" because (despite a lot of effort), we've never quite been able to fully shake the effects of what were apparently a pretty rough initial four months.

I'd gladly avoid dealing with housetraining again and would be very happy to go the shelter/rescue route and adopt an adult dog. Fiancee has come into the picture the past 2+ years, so she missed the early going and wants a puppy. If we're going that route, I'd prefer to have a bit better idea of how it'll turn out, which is why I was considering pure bred.
post #3945 of 4043
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post

on a similar note, working with a rescue is very helpful as well. Most of them foster the dogs, so they often have a multi-month idea of the dog's temperament, exercise needs, likes, dislikes, overall disposition, etc. And most have enough dogs that you can pick and choose which one would be best with some input from the rescue on the individual dogs.

and I'll +1 on our pound dog. Incredibly well behaved dog from the very first minute (and already house broken). Will do again.

From what I understand (and to some extent in my own experience), this is very dependent on where in the country you're located. In the South, you're often able to find quite a range of dogs (even purebreds at rescues) with relative ease. In the northeast, adoptions can be much more of a pain in the ass, and costs quite a bit higher (particularly if working with a rescue org).

Seven years ago when I was looking at adopting, I was turned down for the first shelter dog because I had to leave the house during the day to go to work. A couple of years later when I was volunteering at an adoption event in Nashville, the instruction I was given was basically "Adoption fee is $100, unless they can't pay in which case they can have the dog, and as long as you don't have any alarm bells going off while talking to them, they can take the dog straight home."
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