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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 199

post #2971 of 3790
I can't believe I've never seen the Wobbler before... that looks great for my dog.
post #2972 of 3790
My former boss's English Springer Spaniel loved hers, and (as far as I know), it's still in pristine condition. My dog also loved hers, and understood how it worked (occasionally using it as intended), but preferred to try to fit her tongue through the hole/chew through the top to get to the goods. So mine ended up a slobbery mess. Still, if they would make an XL that was too large for her to fit her mouth around, I'd buy it immediately.
post #2973 of 3790
Thread Starter 

zissou, you answered your own question - more exercise/activity/stimulation.

 

I understand that may be a challenge, but you need a dog walker or a local kid that will wear her out. 

 

lefty

post #2974 of 3790

I've always done a lot of clay shooting, and have hunted farm raised pheasant a few times.  I plan on hunting some grouse this season for the  first time.  From what I hear, they are few and far between lately in my area.  Still it will be nice to get out in to the woods and get some exercise with the dog, even if we do come back empty handed.  I spend all day in a cubicle, and she spends all day in the house, so neither of us get enough exercise anymore, and neither of us are as young as we used to be, so its catching up with us.  I don't expect her to help with the grouse at all.  She is a German Shepherd/Lab/Rottweiler mix, and doesn't have much hunting instinct.  She prefers to chase the deer and wild turkeys away, as a means of protecting her domain.  She sure is pleased with herself after doing so.

post #2975 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Maybe. It's been a while since I read the book. While she did act as a funnel for a lot of dog trainer folk wisdom it does smack of her writing style. Some of her stuff was a little convoluted, but there's no doubt she was a good writer.

What compelled you to call her?

lefty

Actually, she called me because I ran a very favorable review of Bandit back when I was editing Handguns magazine. I have always felt that there were close parallels between the BSL people and the anti-gun crowd. Actually, there's a lot of overlap between them.

I located the quote from Vicki Hearne with ease. It's in the essay "Oyez a Beaumont" in her book Animal Happiness. You were right that it was original with Vicki Hearne. I had been under the impression that it was from Dick Koehler because she talks about Koehler immediately before that. She is talking about her Airedale Gunner, who had once saved her when a man was attacking her with a knife on the beach at Malibu one night:

"Oh rare and dauntless Gunner. Even his hip, broken when a prostate tumor grew right though the bone, did not stop the courage of his gaiety, but I did. My friend Dick Koehler said, "He is lucky to have a good friend like you," to encourage me, you see, to get on with it, kill him, and Dick was right, of course, right, because when there is nothing much left of a dog but his wounds you should bury those decently."

I wept practically the entire time I was re-reading that essay last night, even though I've read it several times before. It reminded me too much of the great dogs I've had to put down.

I understand that some major booksellers won't handle Koehler's books anymore--too brutal. That sort of nonsense makes me glad I am approaching checkout time.
post #2976 of 3790
Thread Starter 

"Oyez a Beaumont".  Now i remember. I guess I condensed the quote down a little over the years.

 

Here's a copy of the essay for those interested: http://www.english.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pdf-library/Hearne_OyezABeaumont.pdf

 

Koehler... a number of years ago I was asked by a group of neighbourhood pet owners to help them with some issues. One was an older puppy who refused to walk on lead despite her owner's coaxing and bribes. I suggested she just ignore the dog and start walking and the dog would probably decide that walking was a far better option than being dragged. The owner looked at me like I was insane and carried her puppy back to the car. It was the last time I tried to help pet owners.

 

Koeher was hard (and was training hard dogs) so you have to modify some of the methods, but there is good info in there.

 

 

Speaking of Airedales, a breeder lets a sport decoy test his dogs:

 

 

lefty

post #2977 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

I suggested she just ignore the dog and start walking and the dog would probably decide that walking was a far better option than being dragged.

Heh. Adopting a dog with issues has given me a special "appreciation" for owners of 7 pound Chihuahuas that act like their dogs can't possibly be moved by the power of a single human.

It always goes something like:
  • Yapping, snarling chihuahua approaches, walking on its hind legs because it is pulling so hard at the very end of its leash (which is of course connected to a harness, not a collar).
  • I put my dog into a sit and start distracting him with tricks.
  • Dog keeps approaching. Owner exaggeratedly follows as if being dragged by mastodon.
  • I discretely move my dog out of their path, continue distracting. "I'm sorry, my dog isn't friendly."
  • "Oh, that's ok." Continues to be dragged towards me by the powerful chihuaua, which is snapping and snarling all the while.
  • "No, please keep your dog away." My dog continues to politely do pushups, spins and begs, but definitely getting a little worked up.
  • Owner gives me horrified look. Manages to muster strength to halt progress of the mighty chihuahua, who nonetheless continues barking uncontrollably.
  • My dog is contemplating the end of this yapping little thing 3 feet away from him. Controls himself nonetheless. "I'm sorry, would you mind taking your dog away?"
  • "I'm trying too!" Chihuahua remains firmly planted, like a barking, growling fire hydrant. In sing-songy voice: "Come along, Mr. Biggles. This... dog... doesn't want to play."
  • I see my dog calculating how many bites to finish the job... One? Or two? I shorten the leash. "You're not trying very hard..."
  • "I'm doing my best." Back to sing-songy voice. "Mr. Biggles, oh Mr. Biggles... who wants a treat?"
  • My dog has had enough, lunges, barks once. "No! Come." Returns to me and back to a sit immediately. Never got closer than 2 feet to suddenly quiet Mr. Biggles.
  • Owner swoops in with the speed of Hermes and lifts mighty Mr. Biggles with the strength of Hercules. "What's wrong with you?!? Control your dog!" Runs off while glaring at me.

Sigh.
post #2978 of 3790
Thread Starter 

^There's a lot of that out there.

 

Christ, I just reread the beaumont essay and also teared up. I take back what I said. Hearne was a great writer. Suggest people give it a look..

 

lefty


Edited by lefty - 9/10/12 at 5:25pm
post #2979 of 3790
Just realized that the Koehler mentioned "Oyez" is not the "Great" Koehler. That was William Koehler. I believe Dick Koehler is his son.
post #2980 of 3790
Thread Starter 

Yes, Dick "DK" was the son. Died in the late '90s. He was a good trainer as well.

 

lefty

post #2981 of 3790
Thread Starter 

!930s Great Dane footage.

 

 

 

Micky the Alsatian jumps.

 

 

lefty


Edited by lefty - 9/11/12 at 5:37pm
post #2982 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

CI, it was written by Vicki Hearne who was a dog trainer/philosopher. She was a smart gal but tended to zig and zag when it came to dogs. Still, well worth reading. I think her best book is Bandit.  Well worth picking up.

 

 

 

http://www.nytimes.com/1991/12/15/books/who-you-calling-a-pit-bull.html

 

lefty

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Christ, I just reread the beaumont essay and also teared up. I take back what I said. Hearne was a great writer. Suggest people give it a look..

 

lefty

 

Looks like it is out of print but found a used in very good condition for $4.06 on Amazon and ordered it. Thanks.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bakes11771 View Post

I've always done a lot of clay shooting, and have hunted farm raised pheasant a few times.  I plan on hunting some grouse this season for the  first time.  From what I hear, they are few and far between lately in my area.  Still it will be nice to get out in to the woods and get some exercise with the dog, even if we do come back empty handed.  I spend all day in a cubicle, and she spends all day in the house, so neither of us get enough exercise anymore, and neither of us are as young as we used to be, so its catching up with us.  I don't expect her to help with the grouse at all.  She is a German Shepherd/Lab/Rottweiler mix, and doesn't have much hunting instinct.  She prefers to chase the deer and wild turkeys away, as a means of protecting her domain.  She sure is pleased with herself after doing so.

 

Good luck in your chase of the King of the uplands! The clay shooting will help you some, at one point I was doing over 10k rounds a year for several years in a row when I shot competition. But trying to hit a bird that goes from 0 to 60 in 1.5 seconds... many people count flushes also. A ratio I have often heard is 36 flushes for 6 shots for 1 bird. That is way too high IMO but still it can be frustrating at times especially with leaves on the trees yet. And it depends if they are spooked due to pressure and flush at a distance or are "limb chickens" but I'm not into ground or tree swatting. The dog would never talk to me again. Your dog will enjoy it and I hope you do too.  

 

A good resource is uplandjournal.com Forums. Introduce your self after lurking for a bit and someone in your area might offer to take you out to show you the ropes. They will never show you the hotspots located at XXX but will help save you years of trial and error. Good luck going after ruff and enjoy the time with the dog. If it wasn't for the dog not sure I would still hunt any more.

 

post #2983 of 3790
I know some of the captions are silly-- i did think the picts were cool.


Photos of War Dogs


We love dogs, but we love war dogs even more because apart from being loyal and cute, they can be absolutely badass. We are so obsessed with these awesome canines that we made a collection of the 30 best photos we could find all over the web. Enjoy.


BADASS: War dogs are not new. They used them in armies thousands of years ago. These are US Army paratrooper rescue dogs being trained in 1944.



U.S. Office of War Information photo


CUTE: Some start like this, as cute puppies in the Military Working Dog Breeding Program on Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio.



DoD photo by Linda Hosek


BADASS: This is Rambo, an explosive detector dog assigned to the U.S. Air Force 447th Expeditionary Security Forces Squadron chomping on a soldier for training.



U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo


BADASS: Dog and US Army Special Forces soldier jump to the sea off the back of a CH-47 Chinook helicopter.



U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Manuel J. Martinez


CUTE: "I'm so happy!"—these dogs are trained with positive reinforcement conditioning techniques. They truly love it.



U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Storm


CUTE: Two buddies resting. Explosive hunter dog Troy and U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Derrick Magee on a patrol break in Afghanistan.



U.S. Marine Corps photo by Staff Sgt. Robert Storm


BADASS: First military dog-human tandem airborne jump from 12,500 feet.




U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Vince Vander Maarel


BADASS: Parachute opens!




U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Vince Vander Maarel


CUTE: You take your dog around the block. Senior Airman Stephen Hanks takes Geri around Sather Air Base's perimeter, where he pees on tanks' threads.



U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Cecilio Ricardo


CUTE: Staff Sgt. Erick Martinez carries Argo III over his shoulder. It's an exercise to build trust and loyalty between them.



U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Allen Stokes


CUTE: Apparently, being carried makes dogs very happy. This is Reyana on Senior Airman Beaun Clegg's back.



U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Gina Chiaverotti-Paige


CUTE: Not all war dogs are German shepherds. Here's eight-year-old explosives sniffer Springer after a helo ride.



Image by John Moore/Getty Images


BADASS: Dogs wear goggles too to protect their eyes. They actually call them doggles. Seriously, that's the actual name. The dog's name is Rico.



U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Elizabeth Rissmiller


BADASS: More doggles action, because there's never enough doggles action. Ajax doesn't seem to mind them.



U.S. Army photo/Pfc. William Servinski II


CUTE: This is Panzer and US Army veteran Brad Schwarz, who suffers from post traumatic stress disorder. Panzer is not a war dog, but a service dog who helps war veterans.



Image by Scott Olson/Getty Images


BADASS: War dogs like to jump through car windows, just because they can.




U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Stacia M. Willis


BADASS: Rangers and a multi-purpose war dog being awesome in the dark.



U.S. Army photo


CUTE: Mack and Senior Airman Gregory Darby. Just bonding.



U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt Stan Parker


CUTE: War dogs love tennis balls. This is Coba, a 3-year-old chocolate lab and tactical explosives detector dog.



U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Christopher M. Gaylord


BADASS: Meki hoisted up to a medical evacuation helicopter in Alaska. War dogs are treated just like their human buddies.



U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew T MacRoberts


BADASS: War dogs even give blood to save their fellow canines. Here's Carly M745, a security forces K-9 being sedated to have blood drawn on July 3.



US Army photo by Tech. Sgt. Caycee Cook


SAD: War dogs die too. Rony was a patrol dog for President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden before dying on March 8, 2012.



U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Vanessa Valentine


CUTE: Liaka, a Dutch shepherd, quietly receiving instructions from her handler on a mission in Hadar, Baghdad.



U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Todd Frantom


CUTE: Search and rescue dog Ronnie high-fiving U.S. Air Force Capt. Greg Auerbach, an KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft instructor pilot with the 54th Air Refueling Squadron.



DoD photo by Senior Airman Leandra D. Stepp, U.S. Air Force


CUTE: Two airedale terriers, one wearing a special gas mask and the other carrying rations for a wounded soldier in World War II.



Fox Photos/Hulton Archive/Getty Images


BADASS: When they are done with their mission, war dogs need to extracted too. Here are some Navy SEALs demonstrating a Special Patrol Insertion/Extraction with one of their dogs.



U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Anthony Harding
post #2984 of 3790
^I have a strong hunch that picture of the Airedales actually dates from WWI, not WWII.
post #2985 of 3790
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

"Oyez a Beaumont".  Now i remember. I guess I condensed the quote down a little over the years.

Here's a copy of the essay for those interested: http://www.english.upenn.edu/~cavitch/pdf-library/Hearne_OyezABeaumont.pdf

Koehler... a number of years ago I was asked by a group of neighbourhood pet owners to help them with some issues. One was an older puppy who refused to walk on lead despite her owner's coaxing and bribes. I suggested she just ignore the dog and start walking and the dog would probably decide that walking was a far better option than being dragged. The owner looked at me like I was insane and carried her puppy back to the car. It was the last time I tried to help pet owners.

Koeher was hard (and was training hard dogs) so you have to modify some of the methods, but there is good info in there.


Speaking of Airedales, a breeder lets a sport decoy test his dogs:




lefty

I watched that argument develop on a thread on the Breeder's (Don) Working Airedale site. It was a epic clusterfuck and one that did not end well for Don.
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