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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 154

post #2296 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

Nope, I think I'm going to continue to hate on what I and others see as a trend towards more and more expensive and extensive treatment for people who think that pets are people in little fur coats.

Too true. Veterinary costs have outstripped the rate of inflation by far. There is a great trend toward over-medication, needless testing and elaborate, human-style medical interventions. I am sure that here and there there are still some wonderful, old-time vets. Most these days strike me as shameless money grubbers. Most knowledgeable dog people i know share this opinion and actively dislike vets as a class. One trainer told me that a vet remarked that her house payment was due shortly, so she was going to "discover" a bunch of ear infections that day!
post #2297 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

 

Is there heartworm out here?  I thought one of the selling points of CA was no bugs.

 

lefty


Recently I've been told that in certain areas up north there is. I've never heard of it before, and I never heard of any dogs getting it growing up.
I figure I can treat it with my flea meds or wormer without much cost so I might as well.
post #2298 of 3752
Thread Starter 

You could go to a farm coop and get some Ivermectin and dose yourself. Or Heartguard for ease.

 

But consider the chances of your dog getting heartworm.

 

Data on heartworm incidence rates at the local level reinforces how rare heart worm really is. For example, on the map above, California is coded red-hot with 500 cases. And yet, when a total of 4,350 dogs in 103 Los Angeles County cities coming from 21 participating animal hospitals were tested, only 18 heartworm-positive tests turned up. And yet, veterinarians are training their staffs not to talk about heartworm tests and medications as an option, but as a need,and for this "needs to be given" message to be bombarded on the customer 3-5 times per office visit. 

 

lefty

post #2299 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

You could go to a farm coop and get some Ivermectin and dose yourself. Or Heartguard for ease.

 

But consider the chances of your dog getting heartworm.

 

Data on heartworm incidence rates at the local level reinforces how rare heart worm really is. For example, on the map above, California is coded red-hot with 500 cases. And yet, when a total of 4,350 dogs in 103 Los Angeles County cities coming from 21 participating animal hospitals were tested, only 18 heartworm-positive tests turned up. And yet, veterinarians are training their staffs not to talk about heartworm tests and medications as an option, but as a need,and for this "needs to be given" message to be bombarded on the customer 3-5 times per office visit. 

 

lefty


Funny you should mention that, I literally spent the last few hours after posting that reading up on do it yourself dosing in general and Ivermectin in particular.
post #2300 of 3752
Wow. Maybe I'm the one with the good vet and shouldn't be so charitable about others? Our vet leaves us alone unless we ask about something or they've noticed something worth checking out, and even then they'll just mention it to us. Our total vet expenses last year were under $1600 for 3 spoiled, people in fur coats treated dogs, including one with a prescription and an ER visit. I also spent a summer working at a clinic and it went similarly.

Norcal- what did they ask to put the dog under for? Also, did they really say that they needed to knock the dog out for a nasal discharge swab? Did she actually say 100% chance of mammary tumors? Were they actually trying to get you to pay multiple hundreds for individual tests? I'm assuming that all of that is hyperbole. If it's not, then just find a new vet. You should be able to get mucus, heartworm, fecal, and extensive blood lab work done for around $350 total; under $250 for if you're doing basic blood work. 3 year RV, DHLPP, lyme, and bordetella should run you under $150 total.
post #2301 of 3752
Last time I was at the vet--for a lousy little ear infection--I was out of pocket for $260. Not that long ago an ethical vet would have looked at the ear, sold me a tube of medication and I'd have been out of there for less than $100.
post #2302 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by HgaleK View Post

Norcal- what did they ask to put the dog under for? Also, did they really say that they needed to knock the dog out for a nasal discharge swab? Did she actually say 100% chance of mammary tumors? Were they actually trying to get you to pay multiple hundreds for individual tests? I'm assuming that all of that is hyperbole. If it's not, then just find a new vet. You should be able to get mucus, heartworm, fecal, and extensive blood lab work done for around $350 total; under $250 for if you're doing basic blood work. 3 year RV, DHLPP, lyme, and bordetella should run you under $150 total.

Not hyperbole. Take into account that prices are high for everything in the Bay Area. She did say 100% or "almost positive" She did not specifically say that my dog had to be out for a nasal swab but said I could get it done when I had her nose scoped which I could do while I was getting an x-ray to check her heart and lungs, presenting all three as a whole. I even asked about gettign a nose test and she said something like "oh, yes get that done while she is out for the scope" as though of course I'll be getting all the treatment, why would I ever want to do just the swab.
What made the whole thing so frustrating is that she did not seem too concerned with the nose problem or the panting (the reason I came in). Which is not to say she did not address it at all but I feel like I am not very much closer to a diagnosis than before I went in.

Also, she is my second vet, I've had the same problems at both places. And these people are highly recommended. Honestly, I think they are skilled and I would totally trust them to do complicated or risky work but it is their treatment philosophy and the general approach to dog care that dominates that annoys me. And it goes beyond the vets, the pet owners are just as bad.
Edited by NorCal - 10/20/11 at 12:31am
post #2303 of 3752
LEFTY: You could go to a farm coop and get some Ivermectin and dose yourself. Or Heartguard for ease.
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

Funny you should mention that, I literally spent the last few hours after posting that reading up on do it yourself dosing in general and Ivermectin in particular.

When I had several large dogs I did just that. It was about $50 for a bottle from a farm catalog that lasted longer than the dogs did. I think I got a free farmer's cap with a pic of a hog or something on it, too.
post #2304 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

Too true. Veterinary costs have outstripped the rate of inflation by far. There is a great trend toward over-medication, needless testing and elaborate, human-style medical interventions. I am sure that here and there there are still some wonderful, old-time vets. Most these days strike me as shameless money grubbers. Most knowledgeable dog people i know share this opinion and actively dislike vets as a class. One trainer told me that a vet remarked that her house payment was due shortly, so she was going to "discover" a bunch of ear infections that day!

Not just vets - a few years ago an EENT doc said I needed to have a deviated septum straightened to prevent nose bleeds. I went to another guy in the same practice who did some cauterization a couple times and everything was fine thereafter. I theorized that the first guy had his eye on a new boat or something.
post #2305 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronRock View Post

Curzon thanks for the advice. Due to the short notice period I have been given I have gone through a pet export company. Jeeezus it is expensive. My flight is cheaper than the dogs!! I had quotes from 7 companies, ranging from GBP2890.0(WTF!!!) to GBP970.00. Ended up going for one which was just above a grand, no stop-overs and British Airways, seemed like a sensible choice.
She's a Lab and flying from London to Singapore. Everything will be sorted by the export company and there is no quarantine in Singapore for dogs coming from the UK. Obviously she will have a hard time adjusting to the temperature but at least there won't be any time on her own in kennels.
She will be travelling in a custom built wooden crate. The IATA are pretty ruthless (rightly so) about the crates animals travel in and they have to conform to a long list of stipulations. She has to fly on a cargo plane (in a pressurized and air-conditioned part). I am told that the altitude generally sends the animals to sleep for most of the journey however I am still quite apprehensive about what state she will be in when I pick her up.
I will report back on how it all goes. The company I have used has been great so far - if everything goes to plan I will name them here, think they deserve a bit of free publicity.

Glad to have been a help. A 1000 quid from UK to Singapore on a quality airline... that's a bargain! Wait 'til to your dog grows and you have to return wink.gif I hope for your wallet's sake you don't have a dog that grows to 40kg+.

Didn't know you had a pup. I am surprised to hear that it was cheaper to have a wooden crate built. Airlines nail you on the weight; I wonder if it would have been cheaper to buy a plastic crate that weighs much less.

I understand your apprehension about her state when she arrives, but I found my dog did very well on each trip. I was much more concerned about water, the hot weather, and the high temperature of the airport's cargo terminal.

Anyway, Singapore has a good expat community that should be able to provide good info on vets, costs, etc. Join some of the forums such as singaporeexpats.com.

I'll give you a potentially money-saving tip. If your job requires a lot of travel it may be cheaper to hire a live-in maid than to pay a kennel to board your pet whilst you're gone. Of course the pet gets all the attention it needs, moreover your shirts are always pressed and the flat is always clean. I recall my mate paying his girl about Sg$1000 a month, which used to be a good value until the Sg$ strengthened incredibly. Have to get gov't approval, which isn't too difficult unless one is a bachelor. I'd choose a Filipina over an Indonesian.

I look forward to reading your report of your relocation. And enjoy your stay.
Edited by curzon - 10/20/11 at 5:54am
post #2306 of 3752
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post

Not hyperbole. Take into account that prices are high for everything in the Bay Area. She did say 100% or "almost positive" She did not specifically say that my dog had to be out for a nasal swab but said I could get it done when I had her nose scoped which I could do while I was getting an x-ray to check her heart and lungs, presenting all three as a whole. I even asked about gettign a nose test and she said something like "oh, yes get that done while she is out for the scope" as though of course I'll be getting all the treatment, why would I ever want to do just the swab.
What made the whole thing so frustrating is that she did not seem too concerned with the nose problem or the panting (the reason I came in). Which is not to say she did not address it at all but I feel like I am not very much closer to a diagnosis than before I went in.
Also, she is my second vet, I've had the same problems at both places. And these people are highly recommended. Honestly, I think they are skilled and I would totally trust them to do complicated or risky work but it is their treatment philosophy and the general approach to dog care that dominates that annoys me. And it goes beyond the vets, the pet owners are just as bad.

Christ man, that sucks.
post #2307 of 3752
Thread Starter 

 

Local Shelters Speak Out About HSUS - humanewatch.org

The Humane Society of the United States likes to claim that it’s the nation’s biggest advocate for shelters—despite donating just one percent of its budget to these groups to help shelter pets. We’ve now released two editions of our “Not Your Local Humane Society” report, and each time the news media went to local shelters to ask them for their opinion.

So what have shelters had to say about HSUS?

“We haven't seen any money from the HSUS."

--Teresa Johnson, PALS [Prevent-a-litter Program] president, in the North Platte Telegraph

"We are not in any way associated with HSUS or PETA. I think sometimes, people look at humane societies as being all one, and we're not at all. Nobody is paid. We're all volunteers. We also don't pay any memberships to national organizations. When Hurricane Katrina struck, we sent $500 down there in emergency money, but it didn't go to HSUS. Other than that, I don't know of any donations that have gone anywhere other than in and around North Platte."
--Jo Mayber, Paws-itive Partners Humane Society secretary, in the North Platte Telegraph

“Not one penny. We receive nothing from them, and the amount of money they get nationally and don’t share with needy shelters like ours is a shame.”
 --Roseann Trezza, Executive Director of the Associated Humane Societies (on News 12 New Jersey)

“It's a good source of confusion for a lot of our donors. We have had issues with people who would intend to name us in their will, but actually name the Humane Society of the United States.”
--Amanda Welby, Seattle Humane Society (on MyFoxSpokane)

“In my experience, in the last 15 years, it's been nothing, in this area, that I know of. We got without food here and we couldn't find a place for it, so I contacted the national humane society, to ask them for help, to help us find some or donate some food for the animals. They wouldn't even give me the time of day, hardly. In fact, they were rude about it, in the office. I think that is tugging at people's hearts, showing those animals and also to receive money nationwide. They need to send it directly to us or to the other shelters.”
--Del Nesmith, Director, Humane Society of Odessa (on News9 Texas)

“There is no humane society in the sky; there is no big brother, you are your own entity, all of us are volunteers. We operate with donations and fundraisers and that’s where our money comes from.”
--Shirley Jarmon, Humane Society of Faulkner County (on KARK Arkansas)

“This is what we’re always trying to educate people about.  The Humane is not affiliated with any other national group. But both groups are helping animals in different ways….We are autonomous.”
--Donna Canazo, Humane Society of Charlotte (on WCNC Charlotte)

"We often hear, 'We gave to the national organization.’ It's frustrating. I'd appreciate it if they didn't do direct-mail [fundraising] pieces here."
--Lynae Gieseke, executive director of the Minnesota Valley Humane Society, in the Star Tribune

“We hear it all the time, ‘But I already gave to the Humane Society.’ They think they are helping the shelter here, but they don't understand that money doesn't come locally.”
Donna Clark, Kanawha-Charleston Humane Association executive director (West Virginia)

“I definitely think it’s an issue. We have people walk into the shelter and say, ‘Oh, I give to the Humane Society of the United States. That’s our opportunity to tell them, ‘No, it doesn’t work that way.’”
– Arlette Moen, Circle of Friends Humane Society executive director (North Dakota)

“My own mother was confused and thought that when she was writing a check to the Humane Society of the United States that was going to support me and my work … If you give to the Kansas Humane Society that’s helping animals locally. When you give to the Humane Society of the United States that’s going to them in Washington DC and they’re choosing how to use your money.” 
– Jennifer Campbell, Kansas Humane Society communications director (on KSNW-TV)

“[People think] that if they give to the national organization that somehow the local organization is benefitting. That's completely false. There's no money whatsoever. We have never received one dime from the HSUS.”
– Raynette Mayer, Central Savannah River Area Humane Society volunteer (Georgia)

“People are also under the assumption that the term ‘humane society’ connotes that that organization must be part of a formal network. In fact, ‘humane society’ is a generic term.”
– Joe Grisanti, Humane Society of Northwestern Pennsylvania director (on WJET-TV)

“These are our communities, this is where our money should be staying. People send it to the national humane society when they see these ads thinking it's going to come back to us, when it's really paying their salaries and paying for these ad campaigns and not doing a thing for our local animals.”
 Olive Sullivan, Southeast Kansas Humane Society promotions director


 

Look how he mind me.

 


 

"Reinterrier" which is Pitbull X Patterdale.

 

 

lefty

post #2308 of 3752
Great post, Lefty. Not alot of love for the HSUS.

Nice doggies.
post #2309 of 3752
I just tried Googling "reinterrier" but all I got were pix of a Boston with reindeer antlers!

Bet a PitxPatterdale is one hell of little dog--kind of what a Staff Bull ought to be.
post #2310 of 3752
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Renterrier is the name given to this line bread by a guy with the last name Renteria... they are multi generations deep and the good ones are GREAT!!! Heavily line bread and he has his recipe down well. Size varies all under 40 lbs tops and I have seen some in the 20's most come in around 35 or so because they are heaver than they look. all dogs with "Ike" in them are bangers some more nervy / handler sensitive than others... all have aggression and will kill anything with fur if turned in that direction. Very trainable and have high food drive. Bond well with owner / family. 
 
Early socialization and environmental a must if you want a good pet (great family dogs) or you just have a hunting machine. Some are spannable but most too big for ground work like a Pat... The advantage is they have an off switch and they are hardier than your average Patterdale and tend to get the work done in a shorter amount of time leaving less injuries and they live longer when hunted on larger game. Plus turning on to Real man work is easy in the ones with the Ike blood. to small for real man stopping obviously (they will die trying) but a good deterant and you can take them anywhere. 

 

Look like a nice alternative to a pat or jagd.

 

lefty

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