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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 142

post #2116 of 3696
Was having a look around for info on behaviour problems the other day and I cam across a forum called the Labrador Forum with this http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-85553.html post.

The op discusses how her dog pins her in the corner of her kitchen and growls, barks and bares his teeth in order to stop her 'escaping.' Answers to her questions on how to change this behaviour claim the dog is not being aggressive but just playful. To be fair they mostly suggest she gets pro help in dealing with the dog, but am I missing something here or is saying the dog not aggressive misguided

I ask becasue a friend has a springer who has 'claimed' the sofa and was wondering how the hell he can sit down and watch tv without getting growled at.
post #2117 of 3696
Thread Starter 
A dog claiming the sofa needs a training collar and lead, and a firm hand. Once you have the ability to physically control the dog it is a simple matter of getting the animal off the furniture and keeping it off. This is probably a minor issue.

Owners need to keep training collars and small leads/tabs on their dog inside the home as that's where most problems begin.

lefty
post #2118 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronRock View Post
Was having a look around for info on behaviour problems the other day and I cam across a forum called the Labrador Forum with this http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-85553.html post.

The op discusses how her dog pins her in the corner of her kitchen and growls, barks and bares his teeth in order to stop her 'escaping.' Answers to her questions on how to change this behaviour claim the dog is not being aggressive but just playful. To be fair they mostly suggest she gets pro help in dealing with the dog, but am I missing something here or is saying the dog not aggressive misguided

I ask becasue a friend has a springer who has 'claimed' the sofa and was wondering how the hell he can sit down and watch tv without getting growled at.

It may not be aggression, just putting her in her perceived place. Any dog will take over if you don't.

Your friend needs to claim the sofa and not allow the dog on it. This could take some time.
post #2119 of 3696
Thread Starter 
Assuming the dog isn't trying to kill him and just growling/baring teeth, it would take a few minutes to correct ("this is not a fight you're going to win, dog"), a few minutes more to teach the new behavior ("welcome to your new bed - the floor"), then some time to proof (I said, the floor").

Keeping the dog off the furniture while you're out is another matter.

lefty
post #2120 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Bull Terriers are very nice, easygoing, very playful dogs in my experience. Probably not too highly trainable. Potential for dog aggression, but not as pronounced as some other bull breeds.

Somewhat subject to Sudden Onset Rage Syndrome--if there really is such a thing. (I gather it's controversial.)

thanks again! that really reinforces all i have heard and read about them. my main question about her is the dog aggression issue and that can only be answered in a dog to me meeting, which i have planned for tomorrow.
post #2121 of 3696
^
Unless you have another dog already in the house or the prospective dog is a total psycho, I wouldn't worry about the dog aggression business too much. Just get a good, strong leather leash and obey the leash laws. As you get to know her and better able to read her body language, you will be better able to gauge how she will react with other dogs. You may not have much of a problem at all. My sense is that bull terriers are somewhat milder than APBTs, AmStaffs, StaffBulls and, Lord knows, Tosas in this regard.
post #2122 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by IronRock View Post
Was having a look around for info on behaviour problems the other day and I cam across a forum called the Labrador Forum with this http://www.labradorforums.co.uk/ftopict-85553.html post.

The op discusses how her dog pins her in the corner of her kitchen and growls, barks and bares his teeth in order to stop her 'escaping.' Answers to her questions on how to change this behaviour claim the dog is not being aggressive but just playful. To be fair they mostly suggest she gets pro help in dealing with the dog, but am I missing something here or is saying the dog not aggressive misguided

I ask becasue a friend has a springer who has 'claimed' the sofa and was wondering how the hell he can sit down and watch tv without getting growled at.

If a dog challenges me for a place on the furniture, he or she gets a good shakedown by the scruff of the neck and a firm verbal reprimand. If the dog continues to challenge, I whip off my belt and drive him off the furniture with a good beating. I had to do that a couple of times with Dempsey, who was the favorite of all my dogs. I have never yet had to do it with Cyrus, even though in most respects he is a much rowdier dog than Dempsey.
post #2123 of 3696
If you can handle training the dog and walking it A LOT, then the dog will be fine. One of my dogs is part pit bull and I walk her 3 to 4 miles a day.
post #2124 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
A dog claiming the sofa needs a training collar and lead, and a firm hand. Once you have the ability to physically control the dog it is a simple matter of getting the animal off the furniture and keeping it off. This is probably a minor issue. Owners need to keep training collars and small leads/tabs on their dog inside the home as that's where most problems begin. lefty
Thanks all for the advice. I have copied all your messages over to him and I hope he has the balls to follow through on what he already knows is the right course of action. He Molly-coddles the dog too much. Hopefully this will show him that he can be stern without being harsh.
post #2125 of 3696
Thread Starter 
I don't know the dog or the situation but it should be pretty easy to fix.

However, here's a pic of a friend - a very experienced dog guy - who tussled with the wrong Malinois.



lefty
post #2126 of 3696
Fuck me! Makes me glad my dog has been so easy. I don't think she even uses the couch when I'm gone.
post #2127 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
If a dog challenges me for a place on the furniture, he or she gets a good shakedown by the scruff of the neck and a firm verbal reprimand. If the dog continues to challenge, I whip off my belt and drive him off the furniture with a good beating.

This +1

Its pretty simple either you're the alpha or the dog is the alpha. Any dog that pins someone in the corner or growls at you when you sit on the couch thinks it's the alpha and needs to be shown the error of their ways real quick.
post #2128 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by BP348 View Post
This +1

Its pretty simple either you're the alpha or the dog is the alpha. Any dog that pins someone in the corner or growls at you when you sit on the couch thinks it's the alpha and needs to be shown the error of their ways real quick.

True - depending on the dog, beating is often not necessary, although firmness always is.

I'm under the impression that hitting bully dogs just amps them up and is counterproductive. Actually, I'm more than under the impression - I know it's the case with some.
post #2129 of 3696
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCal View Post
Fuck me! Makes me glad my dog has been so easy. I don't think she even uses the couch when I'm gone.

I was talking about that dog the other night and was reminded of the pic. He was a large rough PH1 Mal from Holland that was a terror on a decoy. His trachea was damaged and so he sounded like Darth Vader as he ran at you.

That was the result of one clean bite. He just clamped and ripped it off.

I should post a few pics of some of the damage that dogs have done to trainers, including my stitched up lips and missing tooth from a ring dog that went for my face.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jhcam8 View Post
True - depending on the dog, beating is often not necessary, although firmness always is.

I'm under the impression that hitting bully dogs just amps them up and is counterproductive. Actually, I'm more than under the impression - I know it's the case with some.

Depends on the dog; depends on what "hitting" is. I would rather go to a correction collar and lead for control than a whip, belt or hand. I've seen dogs hung until they passed out or beaten until their ears are bloody pulp - not for me.

lefty
post #2130 of 3696
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Depends on the dog; depends on what "hitting" is. I would rather go to a correction collar and lead for control than a whip, belt or hand. I've seen dogs hung until they passed out or beaten until their ears are bloody pulp - not for me. lefty
+1 With you on this one, although I am sure there are times when more hardcore action is needed I'm lucky enough not to have experienced it.
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