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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 13

post #181 of 3757
Thread Starter 
My wife and I have property on a small fishing cove in NS, so come the day that we finally slow down I've pegged the NSDTR as my last dog.

Great little dog. So named (I haven't seen this yet) because they would prance around the shore and lure or toll ducks into range for their hunters.

lefty
post #182 of 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Agree that Patterdales are "seriously cool dogs." I'd strongly consider owning one, but like a lot of the best, unspoiled dog breeds, they really need a job of work to do. They are really too high-drive, high-energy to make good urban companion dogs--at least so people knowledgeable in the breed tell me--which is what I am looking for.
i understand that their gameieness is bred into them, but at the end of the day, isnt the pet what you make it out to be?

Dont you think with the proper exercise and stimulation, a patterdale would be like any other terrier? Nature vs. nurture. All those pats that have a pretty intense drive only have it because their owners promote that kind of behavior and frequently go out to hunt game. If you get a patterdale as a puppy and he has never been exposed to ratting or hunting, then how will he know what to do? Couldnt you just break them of their habits at a young age during their formidable years

ive seen cesar milan do some shit to crazy dogs, and his method isnt rocket science at all and i have been able to use them in situations. Im not saying im a dog expert cuz i watch cesar milan, but i think its all common sense and that a dog can become what you make it.

your thoughts? I really want a pat
post #183 of 3757
Thread Starter 
Short version: get another breed.

Long version: yes, to some extent their dogness is greater than their breed specific temperament, so you can train/raise them to be want you want. To some extent. If you took a well-bred greyhound, kept it on a lead it's entire life and never let it see any small furry animals, the day you took it to a field and turned it loose with a rabbit or two is the day you will lose your dog. What's bred in the bone will come out in the flesh.

If you don't allow/encourage a dog be what's it's meant to be, you demean it and the men who created it. I would argue that is a somewhat cruel gesture. Instead of suppressing the breed's nature., why not take it some hunting trials and see what he's made of? A dog with a job is a content partner and you will be honouring the breed that made you fall in love in the first place.

lefty
post #184 of 3757
Thread Starter 
I may have posted this before, but it's always worth a view. Bull Terrier saves man from bull:



For you, pauliodotnet . . . Super Dobe:



Good ol' boy; good ol' dogs; good ol' hog.



lefty
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post #185 of 3757
A bit of interesting dog news in SoCal last week:

Early reports told of how a man visiting Blue Jay campground in the Santa Ana Mountains was charged by mountain lion and probably would have been killed has his heroic dog not rushed in to the rescue. The dog required four hours of surgery afterward.

Later, however, rangers or wildlife officials (not sure which) investigating the matter came to a different conclusion. Instead of the noble dog saving his master, it seems the fool dog had attacked the mountain lion, which had merely been going about its business. Predictably, the dog got the worst of the exchange. The officials declined to hunt down the lion. I am rather surprised the dog wasn't killed and dragged off by the cat.
post #186 of 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
A bit of interesting dog news in SoCal last week: Early reports told of how a man visiting Blue Jay campground in the Santa Ana Mountains was charged by mountain lion and probably would have been killed has his heroic dog not rushed in to the rescue. The dog required four hours of surgery afterward. Later, however, rangers or wildlife officials (not sure which) investigating the matter came to a different conclusion. Instead of the noble dog saving his master, it seems the fool dog had attacked the mountain lion, which had merely been going about its business. Predictably, the dog got the worst of the exchange. The officials declined to hunt down the lion. I am rather surprised the dog wasn't killed and dragged off by the cat.
Mountain lions are purposeful creatures. If there are people around and they don't want to be bothered, they'll get out of the way in a hurry unless cubs are involved. If they're within close proximity of another animal, there is a solid chance that they're stalking instead. That guy is lucky, whether his dog started it or not.
post #187 of 3757
Just saw this on Archival Clothing - training airedales for war service: http://archivalclothing.blogspot.com...airedales.html
post #188 of 3757
Thread Starter 
Airedales are one of the breeds that can do it all: beast or man. If you don't mind striping the coat, they are a relatively easy keeper for experienced dogmen.

Richardson, who was responsible for training the British dogs during the Great War, used Dales quite often.



Here's a page on him and pics of some of his Dales.

http://community-2.webtv.net/Hahn-50...9/K9History13/

An excellent forum on working Dales:

http://workingairedale.proboards.com/index.cgi?

Recommended breeder of hunting Dales:

http://www.huntingairedales.com/huntingcompanions.htm

lefty
post #189 of 3757
Thread Starter 
"One of the most celebrated first dogs, Warren G. Harding's Airedale Terrier - Laddie Boy, was a celebrity in his own right. Laddie Boy had a high backed, hand carved chair of his own to sit in during cabinet meetings and the White House threw the Terrier birthday parties. The neighborhood dogs were invited to join in the celebration and share in Laddie Boy's bone shaped cake."



"In memory of President Harding, newsboys collected 19,134 pennies to be remelted and sculpted into a statue of Laddie Boy. Harding's widow died before the statue was completed in 1927 and the statue was presented to the Smithsonian Institution where it currently resides."



lefty
post #190 of 3757
My late friend Vicki Hearne once defined an airedale as "wirey coated pit bull that had learned discretion" (or at least something similar to that).

My pal of the pit bull/tiger bump got an airedale out of what were supposed to be good working/performance lines. He was somewhat disappointed in it--not a bad dog, but it didn't have the grit he wanted like his Fila de San Miguel.

I speak of performance lines, but I wonder what canine work functions 'dales are really first-choice for these days.
post #191 of 3757
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
My late friend Vicki Hearne once defined an airedale as "wirey coated pit bull that had learned discretion" (or at least something similar to that).

My pal of the pit bull/tiger bump got an airedale out of what were supposed to be good working/performance lines. He was somewhat disappointed in it--not a bad dog, but it didn't have the grit he wanted like his Fila de San Miguel.

I speak of performance lines, but I wonder what canine work functions 'dales are really first-choice for these days.

That's a very Vicki Hearne thing to say. Hearne's books forced me to look at dogs in a new way. Philosophical anthropomorphizing, but compelling as hell. Loved Bandit: Dosier of a Dangerous Dog

Jan, if you haven't read it you might like McCaig's Eminent Dogs, Dangerous Men about his search through Scotland for a Border Collie.

Need to dash, but I'll respond to your question later.

lefty
post #192 of 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
That's a very Vicki Hearne thing to say. Hearne's books forced me to look at dogs in a new way. Philosophical anthropomorphizing, but compelling as hell. Loved Bandit: Dosier of a Dangerous Dog

I may have exaggerated by calling Vicki Hearne a "friend," but I did have several lengthy phone conversations with her. She got in touch with me after I gave Bandit a favorable review in Handguns magazine, which I then edited. She struck me as one of those strange people who teeter on the borderline between genius and nuttiness. Interestingly, I only recently learned that my brother-in-law had known her back when she contributed occasional pieces to the L.A. Times, for which he works. He couldn't stand her: "She thought she could write," was his comment. I think he tends to have real problems with people more intelligent and talented than himself.

Quote:
Jan, if you haven't read it you might like McCaig's Eminent Dogs, Dangerous Men about his search through Scotland for a Border Collie.

Need to dash, but I'll respond to your question later.

lefty

If we ever have a major earthquake in Long Beach, Eminent Dogs, Dangerous Men will, along with the works of Vicki Hearne be among the first to fall on me if I'm lying in bed. As I recall, McCaig's book was a gift from my mother a few years before she checked out. Most of the urban Border Collies I encounter seem to have kept all the hyper-ness but lost the sagacity and work function. Sad.
post #193 of 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
I may have posted this before, but it's always worth a view. Bull Terrier saves man from bull:



How could anybody who hasnt been traumatized not love dogs, their amazing.
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post #194 of 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
A bit of interesting dog news in SoCal last week:

Early reports told of how a man visiting Blue Jay campground in the Santa Ana Mountains was charged by mountain lion and probably would have been killed has his heroic dog not rushed in to the rescue. The dog required four hours of surgery afterward.

Later, however, rangers or wildlife officials (not sure which) investigating the matter came to a different conclusion. Instead of the noble dog saving his master, it seems the fool dog had attacked the mountain lion, which had merely been going about its business. Predictably, the dog got the worst of the exchange. The officials declined to hunt down the lion. I am rather surprised the dog wasn't killed and dragged off by the cat.

Any idea what breed the man's dog was.

I'm a complete neophyte, but it seems like the dog would have to be fairly big ( and/or totally nuts ) to attack a mountain lion.
post #195 of 3757
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh View Post
Any idea what breed the man's dog was.

I'm a complete neophyte, but it seems like the dog would have to be fairly big ( and/or totally nuts ) to attack a mountain lion.

It was never mentioned in any of the reports I saw, so I am surmising the dog might have been a mix.

A lot of small dogs have no idea of the limitations of their size. There were a couple of unfortunate incidents where small dogs got injured (none very seriously) when they hurled themselves at my Tosas. I would presume the dog in question must have been fair sized simply to have survived the scrap with the lion.
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