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lefty's random dog thread. - Page 10

post #136 of 3684
Thread Starter 
There's a certain point where you just have to say goodbye as it's not fair to put animals through major surgery. If the dog lived a good long time it could just as easily been a normal/expected spinal condition, however it doesn't hurt to check out your next breeder. lefty
post #137 of 3684
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
That "camel" pic is driving me crazy, so here's a young bandog (bandog x Neo) bred by a friend of mine.



That's better.

lefty

As you know I love big, tough dogs. As I think I may have mentioned earlier in the thread or elsewhere, I have met some bandogs that just scared the pants off me! Those Stocks dogs I mentioned were wa-a-ay too much dog for almost anyone.

Most bandogs I have seen in the real world have natural tails, yet I notice this one's is docked. What's the preference among most bandoggers? One rationale for tail docking on guard dog breeds is that it deprives a human adversary of a "handle" to grip the dog by. Any thoughts on this? I note that the breeds most popular in police/security work--GSDs, Mals--have natural tails.
post #138 of 3684
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
As you know I love big, tough dogs. As I think I may have mentioned earlier in the thread or elsewhere, I have met some bandogs that just scared the pants off me! Those Stocks dogs I mentioned were wa-a-ay too much dog for almost anyone.

Most bandogs I have seen in the real world have natural tails, yet I notice this one's is docked. What's the preference among most bandoggers? One rationale for tail docking on guard dog breeds is that it deprives a human adversary of a "handle" to grip the dog by. Any thoughts on this? I note that the breeds most popular in police/security work--GSDs, Mals--have natural tails.

I know that dog's father pretty well and he's a pretty good dog. We were at a rare breed show together and and a Spanish judge pointed out the dog and said that, but for his docked tail, he was an excellent Presa Canario. The dog is a Neo/Pit mix.

I'm kind of old school and there are certain breeds that just don't look right to me with tails, but as to the usefulness of a docked tail I think it's mostly dogman bullshit . . . sorry, lore. They also say that a natural eared dog doesn't hear as well as one with prick ears, but I've yet to meet a natural ear dog that couldn't hear me open the fridge door from across the house.

lefty
post #139 of 3684
Aren't Presas pretty much bandogs anyway? I can recall Stocks telling he was selling one of his "Alaunts" to a Presa breeder to use in his program. I really have some skepticism whether there is really any ancient stock from the Islands in modern Presa lines. I can recall reading Sir Richard Burton's account of his travels down the west coast of Africa in the early 1860s. His ship berthed in the Canary Islands for several days, and he spent most of his time trying to find any of the famous dogs that had been eponymous to the islands, but he couldn't find any.

Of course, I am really skeptical whether any ancient breed survived in anything like recognizable form from antiquity to modern times. Most breed histories are just a lot of fanciful bullcrap--at least those that claim a high antiquity for their breed.
post #140 of 3684
Thread Starter 
I have some friends who hunt with a hawk or falcon and dogs, but this clip is something else . . . Mongolians hunting from horseback and using Golden Eagles to take down wolves.

Well worth watching.



lefty
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post #141 of 3684
^ There are some ranchers and falconry folks in different parts of the world that have picked up that art recently and there's a video somewhere online of a golden eagle being used to take down a small deer.
post #142 of 3684
I have a purely armchair interest in falconry, but I've heard eagles are just hell to manage compared to the smaller birds. Falcons are supposed to become very tractable in short order and are sweetheards to work with. Goshawks are supposed to be very much tougher customers and rather fierce. I've heard Cooper's hawks, which are quite common in my neck of the woods, are so ferocious nobody uses them much for falconry (or "hawking," properly speaking).

After viewing the video of the Mongolians hunting wolves with the eagles, it seemed to me that the wolves looked pretty darn small compared to the eagles. I have a suspicion that a goodly percentage of them were cubs. I should think a full-sized wolf would be an awfully tough nut for an eagle.
post #143 of 3684
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
I have a purely armchair interest in falconry, but I've heard eagles are just hell to manage compared to the smaller birds. Falcons are supposed to become very tractable in short order and are sweetheards to work with. Goshawks are supposed to be very much tougher customers and rather fierce. I've heard Cooper's hawks, which are quite common in my neck of the woods, are so ferocious nobody uses them much for falconry (or "hawking," properly speaking).

After viewing the video of the Mongolians hunting wolves with the eagles, it seemed to me that the wolves looked pretty darn small compared to the eagles. I have a suspicion that a goodly percentage of them were cubs. I should think a full-sized wolf would be an awfully tough nut for an eagle.

I was thinking the same thing - I don't see an eagle taking down a full size North American wolf. Still, those are some badass birds.
post #144 of 3684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
Still, those are some badass birds.

Nothing that flies is more badass than an eagle, and the most badass eagle of them all is the Philippine Eagle, formerly known by the colorful name "Monkey Eating Eagle." The L.A. Zoo had one for a while, and it was almost terrifying to contemplate it was such a pure predator--the fierce, intensely staring yellow eyes for finding prey, the enormous talons for snatching, the massive beak for tearing. What a magnificent killing machine! On the one hand, it lacked the playfulness and/or the dignified languor of most mammalian predators, nor did it have the loathesome and repellent qualities we impute to the snake, the crocodile or the shark. It was almost like some mythological creature--a griffon, perhaps--or an angel of death made manifest.
post #145 of 3684
Thread Starter 
That may well be a little staged, but a Golden has a wingspan of 7-8 feet and only the larger of the Mongolian wolves can reach that length. Big weight difference though.

I was amazed that the eagles did not hesitate to engage an animal that size and in the one case, two eagles worked in tandem.

If I remember correctly, Jan, they use a lot of hybrids to deal with temperament issues in certain species of hawks.

lefty
post #146 of 3684
I've always wondered how they train them not to attack or bite the handlers. All it would take would be a quick peck to the face to loose an eye, nose, or ear. Here's a famous clip of an eagle taking a goat off a cliff. It's part of a larger documentary on the birds, IIRC.
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post #147 of 3684
Thread Starter 
My understanding of eagles is that the handler has a "come to Jesus" meeting with them and the eagles smarten up. Still, I imagine there are incidents. Today in random dog news . . . Italy scraps it BSL dangerous dog list: http://www.lifeinitaly.com/node/4229 (ANSA) - Rome, March 3 - Italy is to scrap its blacklist of dangerous dogs, replacing it with a law making owners more responsible for their pet`s training and behaviour, Health Undersecretary Francesca Martini said Tuesday. Imagine that. ------------------ PETA Killed 95 Percent of Adoptable Pets in its Care During 2008 Hypocritical Animal Rights Group’s 2008 Disclosures Bring Pet Death Toll To 21,339 WASHINGTON DC – Today the nonprofit Center for Consumer Freedom (CCF) published documents online showing that People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) killed 95 percent of the adoptable pets in its care during 2008. Despite years of public outrage over its euthanasia program, the animal rights group kills an average of 5.8 pets every day at its Norfolk, VA headquarters. According to public records from the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, PETA killed 2,124 pets last year and placed only seven in adoptive homes. Since 1998, a total of 21,339 dogs and cats have died at the hands of PETA workers. ----------------------- The first time I ever worked a Bouvier an more experienced decoy warned to watch my face because Bouviers bounce. This shot illustrated that perfectly: if you don't mind the fur, these are great dogs. First registered Bouvier, Nic de Sottegem: Some KNPV Ph1 met lof Bouviers: lefty
post #148 of 3684
Never liked bouviers.. simply not my kind of dog. Im interested in the move made in italy, allthough i think that its a good move for dogs in general im not sure about the effects in the short term...
post #149 of 3684
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baron View Post
Any thoughts on Ridgebacks? I put my Ridgie down last spring and I've had thoughts of getting another. Like a lot of breeds, there are a lot of oversized dogs out there but I get the impression that the relative rarity and newness of the breed means that there's less problems with overbreeding, at least so far.
I love my brothers. I just wish he didn't have cancer. He will be nine this year.... solid 110 pounds.
post #150 of 3684
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nootje View Post
Never liked bouviers.. simply not my kind of dog. Im interested in the move made in italy, allthough i think that its a good move for dogs in general im not sure about the effects in the short term...
I'd never have one unless it was a kennel dog as I couldn't deal with the coat on a wet, muddy day. What I do like about them though is that they fly under the radar. That is, few people are going to expect your shaggy dog to be a monster. I've taken bites from a few and they are great dogs to work: active, responsive and loads of fun. lefty P.S. limping, sorry to hear that.
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