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does anyone watch law and order? - Page 4

post #46 of 78
I'm sorry but anyone who constantly name drops about the brands they are wearing, no matter how esoteric, is a pig.
post #47 of 78
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(AlanC @ May 13 2005,13:55) I'm glad to hear that. It deserves to be. Popular tv done well. Much better than the typical fare of CSI, American Idol or Reba.
Remember that it's been around for a long time.  I think the first show actually premiered in the 80s.
The original premiered in 1990. The others, though, aren't near the quality the original is, and the original isn't nearly what it used to be. The characters are still great -- DF is a wonderfully oddball (for the franchise) addition -- but the storylines nowadays are mainly rehash of (a.) news headlines or (b.) old TV episodes. What I also don't like is the last couple of ADA's, the pretty chicks with all the charisma of cardboard cuttouts. The first three ADA's they had were fantastic; Angie Harmon was okay but nothing special; Elisabeth Roehm was such a droning monotone that I stopped watching the show for a few years. I know this sounds like OFS (Old Fart's Syndrome), but it isn't. I'm not even an old fart. I haven't seen much of it the last few months, and I hope the new ADA is better (it'd be hard not to be).
post #48 of 78
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Tonights show he made a reference about his Gucci Loafers. I guess we all have lapses in sartorial sense
Well, the Gucci bit loafers are considered a classic.
post #49 of 78
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(Manton @ May 13 2005,10:56)
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Originally Posted by AlanC,May 13 2005,13:55
I'm glad to hear that. It deserves to be. Popular tv done well. Much better than the typical fare of CSI, American Idol or Reba.
Remember that it's been around for a long time.  I think the first show actually premiered in the 80s.
The original premiered in 1990. The others, though, aren't near the quality the original is, and the original isn't nearly what it used to be. The characters are still great -- DF is a wonderfully oddball (for the franchise) addition -- but the storylines nowadays are mainly rehash of (a.) news headlines or (b.) old TV episodes. What I also don't like is the last couple of ADA's, the pretty chicks with all the charisma of cardboard cuttouts. The first three ADA's they had were fantastic; Angie Harmon was okay but nothing special; Elisabeth Roehm was such a droning monotone that I stopped watching the show for a few years. I know this sounds like OFS (Old Fart's Syndrome), but it isn't. I'm not even an old fart. I haven't seen much of it the last few months, and I hope the new ADA is better (it'd be hard not to be).
Actually for me, Criminal Intent is usually the best acted and written of all of them. koji
post #50 of 78
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(Teacher @ May 15 2005,00:37)
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Originally Posted by Manton,May 13 2005,10:56
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Originally Posted by AlanC,May 13 2005,13:55
I'm glad to hear that. It deserves to be. Popular tv done well. Much better than the typical fare of CSI, American Idol or Reba.
Remember that it's been around for a long time. I think the first show actually premiered in the 80s.
The original premiered in 1990. The others, though, aren't near the quality the original is, and the original isn't nearly what it used to be. The characters are still great -- DF is a wonderfully oddball (for the franchise) addition -- but the storylines nowadays are mainly rehash of (a.) news headlines or (b.) old TV episodes. What I also don't like is the last couple of ADA's, the pretty chicks with all the charisma of cardboard cuttouts. The first three ADA's they had were fantastic; Angie Harmon was okay but nothing special; Elisabeth Roehm was such a droning monotone that I stopped watching the show for a few years. I know this sounds like OFS (Old Fart's Syndrome), but it isn't. I'm not even an old fart. I haven't seen much of it the last few months, and I hope the new ADA is better (it'd be hard not to be).
Actually for me, Criminal Intent is usually the best acted and written of all of them. koji
Vincent D'Onofrio rocks.
post #51 of 78
I agree on Criminal Intent. Although sometimes the plots get a little loopy. I think Farina and Imperioli have breathed some new life into the original. I watch SVU, but I'm less thrilled about it. I've never even seen the new Crime and Punishment version.
post #52 of 78
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I'm sorry but anyone who constantly name drops about the brands they are wearing, no matter how esoteric, is a pig.
agreed
post #53 of 78
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I've never even seen the new Crime and Punishment version.
It's very good.
post #54 of 78
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(montecristo#4 @ May 15 2005,10:58) I've never even seen the new Crime and Punishment version.
It's very good.
Am I crazy, i've always thought Lilith was hot?
post #55 of 78
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"He came into my office and told me he was going to sue Janet Reno," Wolf said. "I said, 'Michael, this is the attorney general of the United States, not some local politician."' I can understand his point as well. Don't know if I'd support that as well.
Perhaps, but Wolf is never afraid to talk about his principles either. He made a business decision, which is totally cool, but I don't want him to lecture people about standing up for what's right. Michael was left standing by himself defending an entire industry when the chips were down.
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Vincent D'Onofrio rocks.
I've figured out why D'Onofrio looks fatter these days. He's on a steady diet of scenery.
post #56 of 78
Excellent point, Gorgekko.  It's all the shoulder-rolling, weird head-gestures, bobbing and weaving, arm-flinging, and strange stances and movements that really, REALLY, put me off this guy (D'Onofrio) to the point of not being able to watch it anymore--scenery-chewing indeed.. Teacher, I agree completely with your assessment of the series.  In my opinion, Robinett was the best ADA, but perhaps they needed to "sex it up" a little to maintain their popularity.  Today's L&O episodes seem much more like slick entertainment, rather than having the integrity and thought-provoking themes of the earlier ones.  And is it my imagination, or are the recent episodes shorter? In addition, in my opinion, Ben Stone was a far better character as executive ADA than Jack McCoy. Although I really like Sam Waterston as an actor (and have enjoyed him in many roles), I feel that his McCoy is far less credible and certainly less likeable than was Michael Moriarity's Ben Stone. Still despite the shortcomings I see in the more recent iterations of the original L&O, I still watch and really enjoy it.
post #57 of 78
Getting back to sartorial matters, does anyone know where the actors (or, more correctly, I guess, the production company) get their clothes?  Unlike many StyleForumers (and AskAndyers), I dislike spread collars (particularly wide ones), and really like McCoy's shirts--those with the quite narrow, long point collars.  Any ideas about the shirtmaker?
post #58 of 78
i wonder if there is a correlation between style and tv show preferences... a lot of L&O fans here I see.. anyway, Farina's character really caught me off guard at first and I was nearly positive this was going to be the show's take on the queer eye refined 'meterosexual'. Thankfully that wasn't the case. as for the show's references, I think the writer have to mix in famous brands (prada, gucci) with lesser known ones, or else the general public would never pick up on his sense of style. i'm personally a big fan of sam watterson's character (Jack McCoy) and I love how he keeps on shooting down those liberal ADA hippy girls. oh, lilith is hot, in that 'probably an animal in bed' kind of way.
post #59 of 78
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In my opinion, Robinett was the best ADA, but perhaps they needed to "sex it up" a little to maintain their popularity.
Robinett was a great ADA, and Jill Hennessey was good, too; far better than her "Crossing Jordan" character. From what I've read, Wolfe was ordered by NBC to ax Robinett and bring in a woman to "diversify" his then all male cast. The same fate happened to the police captain whose character was revived on "L&O: SVU". Regarding clothing, I've seen a huge list of ties at least offered on ebay that claimed to be wardrobe from the series. Some of the ties were pretty nice, others average. Of course that would be in keeping with reality. Most of the best ties on the show are worn by defendants, and now, of course, Farina.
post #60 of 78
Long before the arrival of Dennis Farina as the dandified Det. Fontana, the wardrobes on all the L&O shows have been very well selected to reflect the characters, none of whom seems to turn up in anything another of the characters would ever wear. For example, did Jerry Orbach as Briscoe own a jacket that wasn't plaid? Does Sam Waterston as McCoy own a tie that isn't some shade of red? I take this as evidence of the care and craft that can enrich popular entertainment, which thankfully is not limited to Dick Wolf productions. NYPD Blue, which recently ended a long run, also used wardrobe as an index to character. Before he left the cast Jimmy Smits wore beautiful earth-toned clothes that seemed to express the combination of humility and authority that defined his character. Dennis Franz as Sipowicz wore only short-sleeve "dress" shirts. Bill Brochtrup as the gay receptionist John wore more sweaters than Lana Turner in her heyday. With regard to the latest entry in the franchise, Criminal Defense, Bebe Neuwirth's and Amy Carlson's clothes are really superior--perhaps too much so, as they are so striking as to distract attention from the plots and performances (at least for me). The Neuwirth character's garnet-red shearling coat is perhaps the most conspicuous example. Routine references to Prada suggest some product placement is going on. Any industry insiders who could comment?
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