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Cuffs on a tuxedo???

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Despite the subject, I did not buy a tuxedo.  I did, however, buy a nappy 3 button black suit that can double as a tuxedo if I dress it up properly. Question:  When I get it tailored should I go with or without cuffs on the pants?  This suit will be used more for business than formal wear, and I'm a cuffs type of guy.  However, I don't want to look foolish on the 1-2 times per year when I wear it as a tux. What do you think. Thanks, AverageJoe
post #2 of 7
Well, a tux is a tux, and a black suit ain't. That said, it's going to be more tux-like with no cuffs, because one would never, ever cuff tux pants. On the other hand, as long as you're getting away with wearing a black suit rather than a real tux for formal occasions, I don't imagine that cuffs on the trousers will make a whole lot of difference at that point. Are the trousers flat-front or pleated?
post #3 of 7
Actually I've seen cuffed tuxes, and lo and behold, it looks fine. I also prefer double vented tuxes, despite the more "formal" look being ventless. IN addition, I never understood the "formalness" of besom as opposed to flap pockets--flap pockets, when hand stitched, look infinitely more classy.
post #4 of 7
As pstoller stated, a tux is a tux, and a black suit something else altogether. Having said that, there are plenty of black suits out there which will do nicely for less formal evening affairs, especially in our dressed down age. Neapolitan cut suits, especially, with their high cut airholes and suppressed waist, are especially suitable. Personally, I own a peaked lapel three button black crepe suit which I find to be a rather nice hybrid number, suitable for a variety of events. I prefer uncuffed pants for my suits as well as for my tuxes. I know that the extra material make pleated trousers drape better, but I prefer the clean, unbroken line of uncuffed pants. It's a compromise, either way. I have seen cuffed tux pants, but think that they look rather odd, since tux pants are generally flat front and cut slim to elongate the profile, and should break dramatically over your formal pumps. For the same reason, I think that besom pockets look much more appropriate on a tuxedo jacket than do flap pockets, which break the continuity of the jacket's silhouette. A tuxedo should look, as much as possible, like a sheath. Remember, it is a dramatic garment meant for the evening - its movement is infinitely more important than details like hand-stitching.
post #5 of 7
As pstoller stated, a tux is a tux, and a black suit something else altogether. Having said that, there are plenty of black suits out there which will do nicely for less formal evening affairs, especially in our dressed down age. Neapolitan cut suits, especially, with their high cut airholes and suppressed waist, are especially suitable. Personally, I own a peaked lapel three button black crepe suit which I find to be a rather nice hybrid number, suitable for a variety of events. I prefer uncuffed pants for my suits as well as for my tuxes. I know that the extra material make pleated trousers drape better, but I prefer the clean, unbroken line of uncuffed pants. It's a compromise, either way. I have seen cuffed tux pants, but think that they look rather odd, since tux pants are generally flat front and cut slim to elongate the profile, and should break dramatically over your formal pumps. For the same reason, I think that besom pockets look much more appropriate on a tuxedo jacket than do flap pockets, which break the continuity of the jacket's silhouette. A tuxedo should look, as much as possible, like a sheath. Remember, it is a dramatic garment meant for the evening - its movement is infinitely more important than details like hand-stitching.
post #6 of 7
As pstoller stated, a tux is a tux, and a black suit something else altogether. Having said that, there are plenty of black suits out there which will do nicely for less formal evening affairs, especially in our dressed down age. Neapolitan cut suits, especially, with their high cut airholes and suppressed waist, are especially suitable. Personally, I own a peaked lapel three button black crepe suit which I find to be a rather nice hybrid number, suitable for a variety of events. I prefer uncuffed pants for my suits as well as for my tuxes. I know that the extra material make pleated trousers drape better, but I prefer the clean, unbroken line of uncuffed pants. It's a compromise, either way. I have seen cuffed tux pants, but think that they look rather odd, since tux pants are generally flat front and cut slim to elongate the profile, and should break dramatically over your formal pumps. For the same reason, I think that besom pockets look much more appropriate on a tuxedo jacket than do flap pockets, which break the continuity of the jacket's silhouette. A tuxedo should look, as much as possible, like a sheath. Remember, it is a dramatic garment meant for the evening - its movement is infinitely more important than details like hand-stitching.
post #7 of 7
Tux trousers never, never, never have turn-ups; they have "galons" going down the sides: narrow strips of satin or woven braid. (Two for the tail coat trousers). It would be incredibly bulky, trying to fold them into turn-ups. Sometimes (not very common these days) the jacket sleeves can have "turn-ups" called "gauntlets", narrow cuffs with a silk facing.
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