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JM Weston Boston

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
So it seems JM Weston's new store on Newbury has closed after only being open for five or six months. I walked by there on Sunday and there are no more shoes in the window and it appears as if everything has been cleared out. Unless they moved (which I doubt) to a new location, was this a costly lesson in demographics? I was surprised when they moved in...but I can't say I'm surprised to see them go. Anyone privy to why they left?
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Unless they moved (which I doubt) to a new location, was this a costly lesson in demographics? I was surprised when they moved in...but I can't say I'm surprised to see them go.
Why?
post #3 of 15
Serious? I guess they didn't have a fire sale before they closed. Damn. If they closed, I have three theories: (1) The street location was not optimal for passersby looking for high end men's dress shoes -- it was down too far Newbury, past Polo, Louis, Brooks, and Allen Edmonds. So, it sort of was detached from the heavy hitters in terms of dress shoes. (2) The garden level store location wasn't amenable to window shopping; so unless you knew what you were looking for, it was easy to miss (indeed, they only had like three shoes in the front window; so they weren't even trying to create an appealing front window). (3) They were closed on Sundays, which is perhaps the best time to shop on Newbury. Louis is the only store I know of that is closed on Sundays on Newbury, and, well, they're Louis so they can get away with it.
post #4 of 15
So there's no close-out sales? I visited their store last October, so they'd probably opened the store around that time.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Serious?  I guess they didn't have a fire sale before they closed.  Damn.   If they closed, I have three theories:  (1)  The street location was not optimal for passersby looking for high end men's dress shoes -- it was down too far Newbury, past Polo, Louis, Brooks, and Allen Edmonds.  So, it sort of was detached from the heavy hitters in terms of dress shoes.  (2)  The garden level store location wasn't amenable to window shopping; so unless you knew what you were looking for, it was easy to miss (indeed, they only had like three shoes in the front window; so they weren't even trying to create an appealing front window).  (3)  They were closed on Sundays, which is perhaps the best time to shop on Newbury.  Louis is the only store I know of that is closed on Sundays on Newbury, and, well, they're Louis so they can get away with it.
Me thinks like you. Garden level spot was horrible. I think they would have been better off in a smaller space in Copley or in a spot a block towards Arlington. Their store on Madison is a much better fit. I can't remember much, if any advertising on their part as well. If you aren't a shoe geek, you wouldn't even noticed they were here. I went in once and thought I probably woke the salesman when he heard the door close. I was headed over to get some Saphir, but will have to order from Rider or wait till I am back in NY. Aside from this forum, I heard no chatter among people I know who bought shoes from the store or who were excited about their opening.
post #6 of 15
Yeah, the store was practically invisible. I walked down Newbury Street twice looking for it before I spotted it on the third pass.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Quote:
(petescolari @ May 10 2005,12:03) Unless they moved (which I doubt) to a new location, was this a costly lesson in demographics?  I was surprised when they moved in...but I can't say I'm surprised to see them go.
Why?
I say that because I think they are not a recognized brand here in Boston. Even though there is a huge influx of international students and tourists, Bostonians by and large, follow the Am Trad school of thought. One only has to look a block above and below where they were situated to realize they were surrounded by Brooks Brothers, Ralph Lauren, Allen Edmonds, and the Andover Shop. I think if many of the same shoppers were to migrate outside of these establishments for shoes, they would mostly likely go to Louis. It's hard to imagine or think of a standalone store on Newbury in where there is anything not under $450. Think of Zegna, Camper, Longchamp. They are all a block or two from where Weston setup shop. They are all higher-end Euro products, but at least they offer items under four bills. While I lived in NY, I enjoyed browsing all the stores above the 60's on Madison, but at the same time, I saw people walking around with shopping bags from Weston, et al while I was there. Here in Boston, I don't know anyone who bought shoes from them even though these people's sizes are on file at Louis, RL, BB, and AS. In sum, it's a shame they left so soon. It wasn't a surprise though to see them close shop since they didn't seem to spend a dime on advertising or p.r.
post #8 of 15
Their website doesn;t list a Boston store. They do say that they are carried at Mr. Sid in Newton Centre, however. Don't know if this is new or not.
post #9 of 15
Simple fact:Boston is not a world class city.It thinks it is,but everyone knows it's just a runt of a city(albeit with great sports teams).Lousy roads,lousier drivers,and yes,much of the time lousy weather.Newbury Street is just a microcosm of Madison Avenue,the champs Elysees or Rodeo Drive,for that matter.New York is sooo much better in every respect compared to Boston.I don't think there's more than a handful of bona fide five star restaurants or hotels in Boston.It's a shame JM Weston couldn't survive on the cheapskate Bostonians.Ah,well,they should have known better.
post #10 of 15
I beg your pardon. I hope you never visit this first great city with that insulting attitude. So what if we wear our shoes till they have holes in them. Had they had the right person at the helm of that store, we wouldn't be having this conversation, nor having to respond to the likes of you.
post #11 of 15
Quote:
I beg your pardon. I hope you never visit this first great city with that insulting attitude. So what if we wear our shoes till they have holes in them. Had they had the right person at the helm of that store, we wouldn't be having this conversation, nor having to respond to the likes of you.
It *may* have survived. But I've got to agree that the consumer mentality is *very* different here than in LA or NYC. That said, I saw essentially no advertisement nor editorial for the store during it's brief tenure here. Here's to hoping that they open an APC boutique on Newbury Street in its stead (and why not? The prices are conservative, the cuts are clean and colors subdued - could do very well).
post #12 of 15
The Weston store ran itself into the ground; it had nothing to do with the shoes, nor the lack of clientele in Boston. The fact that Louis not only survives, but apparently thrives, is evidence that a well run high end store can do well in Boston. The Weston store was probably the worst run store I've ever seen. And I say that in all seriousness.
post #13 of 15
My point exactly, one of the great lessons I learned from Murray Pearlstein was that all the advertising in the world doesn't mean shit if you don't empower your employees and engage internal marketing skills. What I mean is get on the phone, drop a line, network, network, network. Evidently, the staff at JM Weston were to busy waiting for it to happen.
post #14 of 15
Quote:
...Evidently, the staff at JM Weston were to busy waiting for it to happen.
Really? One would expect that a J.M. Weston would have its pick of employees...
post #15 of 15
Had any of you actually been inside JM Weston on Newbury? I went in once (would have went in three times, but -- doh. -- the store is closed on Sunday.). The guy knew his product fairly well, but it was clear that he wasn't a true shoe junkie. He could point out the welting, etc. on the cut open model shoe they had in the store (a very good educational tool, I might add), but it was clear he had no real appreciation for the shoes in the store. He just said, "They're very nice. Very well made." Not a lot of emotion. Maybe he saw that I wasn't going to buy, but I was dressed quite nicely when I went in and had a bag from Polo. I was the only customer there. His attitude sort of struck me as consistent with the attitude of the store front -- there, but sort of invisible. Nothing you'd notice unless you were looking. Boring. Etc. Indeed, the interior of the store was just as bland and sterile.
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