or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › shoe care supply checklist
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

shoe care supply checklist - Page 8

post #106 of 193
What does everyone find is the best surface to polish your shoes on? I use my kitchen counter, I just put some newspaper down. The problem is it can be a real pain when I want to use both hands to hold a cloth and buff my shoes because they end up flopping around.

Does anyone use those stands that come on the top of some Shine Boxes like this: http://www.kiwishoeshine.com/pics/HR...e_box_wood.jpg

I especially like to give the toes and heels of my shoes mirror shines what is the best thing to use?
post #107 of 193
Here's my kit... polishes for most colors... horsehair brushes and creams... more pics on my blog
post #108 of 193
What's your favorite polish, Hooligan, and why?
post #109 of 193
I need some clarification please.

I have some shoes that I have neglected for a while and I want to get them ready to wear. I have seen some people recommend lexol and some have not. I understand that Lexol can darken shoes but I have mainly blacks and lexol has a product that supposedly does nto darken.

To those that use lexol to condition your shoes, is this the lexol product you buy?

http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1013-Lea...xgy_auto_img_b

And have you tried the non-darkening version?

http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1412-Nea...7145669&sr=1-9

Also, I plan on getting some crema alpina (I think it has been renamed) how long does a bottle last? Trying to figure out how many to get. I plan to use this product, after I "cost effectively" condition my shoes so that the shoes don't "drink" all of the crema alpina.

Thanks.

Why4009
post #110 of 193
my regime consists of:
1. Wipe whole shoe with a damp cloth.
2. Soft brush dampened and use pure soap to clean off previous wax .
3. Clean off soap with a damp cloth
4. RM. Williams leather conditioner
5. Buff off excess conditioner
6. RM. Williams Wax(no alcohol in it)
7. Buff with soft brush
8. Second buff with nylon stocking

Each time i wear them they get done.
post #111 of 193
Bump...can someone answer my lexol question please?
post #112 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by why4009 View Post
I need some clarification please.

I have some shoes that I have neglected for a while and I want to get them ready to wear. I have seen some people recommend lexol and some have not. I understand that Lexol can darken shoes but I have mainly blacks and lexol has a product that supposedly does nto darken.

To those that use lexol to condition your shoes, is this the lexol product you buy?

http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1013-Lea...xgy_auto_img_b

And have you tried the non-darkening version?

http://www.amazon.com/Lexol-1412-Nea...7145669&sr=1-9


To answer your question I am a regular Lexol user and I use the leather conditioner at the top (the brown bottle one). While it darkens the shoe as it is put on, as it dries on lighter brown shoes I've seen virtually no darkening. Maybe half a shade, but that's it. I highly recommend the product as it works wonders on well worn leather.
post #113 of 193
In the U.S. we call it spit shining--ironically no spit is actually involved.

In the U.K. it is called bulling. The explanation here is very good and in English--though with a weird accent

The critical ingredient is time.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDF18Ob8bhc
post #114 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston Tweed View Post
To answer your question I am a regular Lexol user and I use the leather conditioner at the top (the brown bottle one). While it darkens the shoe as it is put on, as it dries on lighter brown shoes I've seen virtually no darkening. Maybe half a shade, but that's it. I highly recommend the product as it works wonders on well worn leather.

Do you wait for the shoes to return to normal color before polishing? I started using Lexol on my black shoes recently because there's no real risk there and I don't really let it settle for awhile, generally just 20-30 minutes. I tried it on some horrid Stacy Adams tan shoes that I was willing to sacrifice and they essentially turned close to black and I more or less frantically sprayed water, took some cloth, and used a blow dryer to get rid of it, or I guess just force it down into the shoe more realistically. I think it may have left a black spot on the side of one shoe but I haven't worn them in a year and can't say I carefully inspected them before trying. I would be interested in hearing if anyone with chestnut colored or similarly light colored shoes uses Lexol without any ill effects, otherwise I'll keep it for my black shoes and leather jackets and look into conditioners specifically for shoes.
post #115 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by adeft View Post
Do you wait for the shoes to return to normal color before polishing? I started using Lexol on my black shoes recently because there's no real risk there and I don't really let it settle for awhile, generally just 20-30 minutes. I tried it on some horrid Stacy Adams tan shoes that I was willing to sacrifice and they essentially turned close to black and I more or less frantically sprayed water, took some cloth, and used a blow dryer to get rid of it, or I guess just force it down into the shoe more realistically. I think it may have left a black spot on the side of one shoe but I haven't worn them in a year and can't say I carefully inspected them before trying. I would be interested in hearing if anyone with chestnut colored or similarly light colored shoes uses Lexol without any ill effects, otherwise I'll keep it for my black shoes and leather jackets and look into conditioners specifically for shoes.

I used lexol on a pair of chestnut coloured shoes just last week without any ill effects. Just make sure you spray it onto a cloth, not onto the shoe directly, so as to get a nice even application. Depending on the condition of the leather you might have to do two coats a couple of hours apart. I wait 24+ hours before polishing afterwards.
post #116 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edicron View Post
I used lexol on a pair of chestnut coloured shoes just last week without any ill effects. Just make sure you spray it onto a cloth, not onto the shoe directly, so as to get a nice even application. Depending on the condition of the leather you might have to do two coats a couple of hours apart. I wait 24+ hours before polishing afterwards.

Edicron, just to confirm you used the normal lexol (brown container) and not the other one (in the tannish container), right? Thanks!

Why4009
post #117 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post

The Process

Your shoes should be polished and/or conditioned at least a couple times a month...each week, ideally. Even if you don't do this yourself, drop a pair off at your local shoe repair shop or stop by a shine stand as often as possible. You can even purchase a set-up and give it to your favorite cobbler/bootblack and ask that they use these products to care for your shoes. If you choose to polish/clean/condition your shoes yourself, start by applying a liberal amount of one of the conditioner/cleaners mentioned above. Allow a few minutes and promptly rub briskly with a cotton or felt rag. The shoe bags that often come in the box with "˜better' shoes are ideal for this...simply cut into large strips for your polishing use. Next, apply the appropriate shoe cream to areas that are showing the most wear. It is not necessary for the colors to match exactly (except for black, obviously), but to either blend in, or to highlight at your choosing. For example, a "˜cognac' colored shoe might see "˜tan', "˜mahogany', "˜light brown' or "˜mid-brown' polishes; or maybe all four. Experiment. After the cream hazes over, apply another coat of cleaner/conditioner and let sit for a few minutes. Take a high quality horsehair brush (the best are from Frank-Brushes, in Germany) and brush along the sides and across the vamp (top to the tip). Next, apply your choice of wax/paste polish and, again, allow to haze over. After 5 minutes or so, brush off as before. Finally, re-apply one more coat off cleaner/conditioner, allow to dry for a minute or two, and brush again. You can stop now, or continue to a "˜spit-shine' step, which really just involves taking and old necktie (or nylon hose), misting a little water onto your shoe, and rapidly buffing with the silk rag. The heat from the quick motion combined with a little water will "˜build' another protective layer onto your shoe. A final step, though one I do not really recommend for most, is to use a "˜edge dye' (we simply use leather dye from Fiebings) to dye the sole/welt edge and trim. This is tricky, and it is easy to ruin an upper if you do not do this carefully with the included dauber, so I would leave this to the cobbler, but the leather dye is readily available from Fiebings.

first of all, i wanted to say thanks for the article posted on page one. i'm still looking for a cobbler that even knows what Saphir products are, but it's comforting to know people in a similar position to myself at least have access to knowledge.

i just wanted to confirm my understanding of the above process, which i take is the standard process for achieving a great polish. the above seems to say to apply conditioner -> shoe cream -> conditioner -> wax -> conditioner -> optional spit shine and edge dye. is this correct, i.e. are there at least 5 layers, 3 of which are conditioner?
post #118 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by RIDER View Post
A personal observation is that Lincoln and the Avel polishes are the most effective in regards to coverage, protection and filling/fixing minor scuffs and cuts.

everyone, I'm looking for a simple but effective way of removing scuffs.
As so nicely written ed by RIDER above, he mentions using Lincoln and Avel polishes, but which specific product should I be using ? And which website can I purchase these from ?

Also, I have many pairs of shoes, some light brown, some medium brown, some dark brown, some black etc .... can I get a product that is a one-size-fits-all, i.e. one product that can cover scuffs on all colors of leather ?

thanks!
post #119 of 193
All in one product - none! Scuffs - buy shoe trees, use good conditioner (and have good qualtiy shoes)!
post #120 of 193
Quote:
Originally Posted by senocs View Post
everyone, I'm looking for a simple but effective way of removing scuffs.
As so nicely written ed by RIDER above, he mentions using Lincoln and Avel polishes, but which specific product should I be using ? And which website can I purchase these from ?

Also, I have many pairs of shoes, some light brown, some medium brown, some dark brown, some black etc .... can I get a product that is a one-size-fits-all, i.e. one product that can cover scuffs on all colors of leather ?

thanks!

any ideas anyone ?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › shoe care supply checklist