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What web browser do you use? - Page 4

post #46 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by vitaminc View Post
Opera was very attractive but then both FF and IE has addons for mouse gestures now...

Quote:
Originally Posted by huy View Post
Firefox. There is a gesture add on that I use that is not available on any other browser.


I have no clue what you guys are talking about. What are "mouse gestures" and how do they help you browse?

thanks,
b
post #47 of 69
Mouse gestures help make your browsing faster. Download the addon and give it a try. You hold down the right mouse button, then use a 'gesture' for common browsing operations like back, forward, home, reload, etc rather than reaching up and hitting the button. For instance, to go back, hold the right mouse button and flick your mouse to the left and let go of the button. All gestures are completely customizable to your preferences too.
post #48 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdawson808 View Post
I have no clue what you guys are talking about. What are "mouse gestures" and how do they help you browse?

thanks,
b

I use all-in-one gestures, a firefox plugin. Once you're used to it, your speed is improved by at least 100%. I won't even use a browser without some sort of gestures program.

If you use IE, I suggest Avant Browser. It's based on IE, but has a bunch of cool stuff built in, e.g. tabs, gestures.
post #49 of 69
Chrome, I love it! FireFox uses too much memory up. I don't like to shut down my browser and I do have around 30 tabs open at one time for days.
post #50 of 69
Mouse gestures are a big deal, probably the biggest advance in browsing since tabs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkNWorn View Post
I use all-in-one gestures, a firefox plugin. Once you're used to it, your speed is improved by at least 100%. I won't even use a browser without some sort of gestures program.

If you use IE, I suggest Avant Browser. It's based on IE, but has a bunch of cool stuff built in, e.g. tabs, gestures.
post #51 of 69
Ehh... I think heavy reliance on the mouse is terrible. That's why I picked xmonad and figured out all the keyboard shortcuts for firefox. Everything's a lot faster.
post #52 of 69
I use Safari 4 on my MBP w/ Glim for a few tweaks and I use GlimmerBlocker to handle the add blocking (it's a proxy, so it works on all browsers).

I use Firefox 3.0 on my Windows VM and Linux T61.

In Windows and Linux, I find that Firefox is fastest, and the wealth of plugins makes it the best browser overall. In the native MacOS environment, I prefer Safari because it seems a bit quicker and does a better job rendering fonts than Firefox; however, its configurability and lack of plugins makes it feel like a second tier browser. I wish Firefox were as good in native MacOS as Safari in terms of speed and font rendering, but I always find myself coming back to Safari in MacOS.
post #53 of 69
I used to have that attitude, but have come to find that a mix of both keyboard shortcuts (hotkeys), AND using the mouse is most efficient. At least in the Windows 95 - XP GUIs.

The right mouse button makes the mouse an incredibly efficient and powerful tool in the Windows OSes.

90% of the time when people at the office ask for help on the computer on how to do something in any application, having them simply right click the mouse and glance at the options provided gets them through it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Berticus View Post
Ehh... I think heavy reliance on the mouse is terrible. That's why I picked xmonad and figured out all the keyboard shortcuts for firefox. Everything's a lot faster.
post #54 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn View Post
I used to have that attitude, but have come to find that a mix of both keyboard shortcuts (hotkeys), AND using the mouse is most efficient. At least in the Windows 95 - XP GUIs.

The right mouse button makes the mouse an incredibly efficient and powerful tool in the Windows OSes.

90% of the time when people at the office ask for help on the computer on how to do something in any application, having them simply right click the mouse and glance at the options provided gets them through it.

The keyboard is useful beyond shortcuts and hotkeys. It can drive interactive productivity on its own. The mouse is definitely a helpful and intuitive user interface for the average user, but the good ol' keyboard is also extremely powerful for the more technical user. I don't know what I'd do without a keyboard-driven app launcher.
post #55 of 69
As an app launcher? What do you do hit the windows key then arrow and enter your way to the app you want?

Something tells me you're a *n*x user rather than Windows.
post #56 of 69
So, after reading this thread, I started using Safari 4 today. It seems slower to toggle between tabs.

This is a good overview of browsers for Mac OS: http://www.macworld.com/article/1326.../browsers.html
post #57 of 69
I have been using Chrome since January. Simple and clean.
post #58 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by javyn View Post
As an app launcher? What do you do hit the windows key then arrow and enter your way to the app you want?

Something tells me you're a *n*x user rather than Windows.

I use Quicksilver as my app launcher. No arrows. A few keystrokes maximum to open any app, move files, take screenshots, send an email, write a note/todo, open a bookmark, run a command, etc.

I've been a Windows and Linux/BSD user for over a decade, and I eventually found the best of both worlds in MacOS. I still use Windows in VMWare, and I still have linux on VM and on a dedicated laptop for specific needs. Also, I've never been afraid of change when it comes to user interface. I've taken elements that I learned within each OS and I try to integrate them into all of my environments (e.g., app launchers, no desktop icons, no start menu, no dock, no taskbar, etc) to achieve maximum productivity.

Day 1 of no desktop icons, I thought it was the dumest thing ever. Day 10, I couldn't believe I ever used desktop icons for anything. They are so inefficient. You have to move a bunch of windows out of the way in order to access them. Either that or you give up usable window space for the icons.

Day 1 without a dock in MacOS, I thought I was missing out. Day 2, I realized I was missing out when I had the dock. A mouse shortcut not only takes longer to navigate through, but its a waste of screen space. It also takes time to manage. App launchers solve this problem and many more, and they manage the addition and removal of applications automatically.
post #59 of 69
I'll have to check that out. But I hear you on a clean desktop. Windows desktop was not designed as an application launcher but as a workspace much like....well, a desktop!
post #60 of 69
I haven't had an item on my desktop in years. I use an auto-hide toolbar on the top with a quicklaunch area for most-used applications, and sub-toolbars to My Computer, My Documents, etc. Other than that, I access other programs from the Start Menu. 90% of my days are spent in a few applications, and with this approach, most of them is just a single click away (slide mouse up, toolbar appears, CLICK, done). Screw trying to remember different keyboard combos for app launcher. I'm getting too old for this shit.
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