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Japanese Suit innovation - Page 2

post #16 of 22
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(johnw86 @ May 04 2005,05:38) From an article in the LA Times--apparently the government is pushing this so they don't need to use as much air conditioning in offices this summer. http://www.latimes.com/news....adlines
If the Japanese go business casual, it's all over.  There's no hope.
Are you kidding me? Japanese have the some of the coolest streetstyle ever. Change the dress code from "business casual" to "denim" and the Japanese will have a coolest attired office's from here to, well, Tokyo. In 20 years time, American men will also be ready. LA will be ready to lead the charge.
post #17 of 22
You know, the Japanese should send some people over to Naples and copy the unstructured, unlined suit, and bring it over to their own shores.
post #18 of 22
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Are you kidding me?  Japanese have the some of the coolest streetstyle ever.  Change the dress code from "business casual" to "denim" and the Japanese will have a coolest attired office's from here to, well, Tokyo.
Are you kidding me? Typical Japanese salarymen and bureaucrats look far worse in casual clothes than they do in their weekday rumpled suits. The fact that a narrow band of mostly youthful people, geographically limited to mostly a few neighborhoods in Tokyo, have cool streetwear does not mean that a conversion to business casual will benefit the overall dress of the (stereo)typical oyaji/sarariman. A switch to business casual might increase the incidence of loud plaid pants worn with rumpled blazers on the Marunouchi-sen during the week, which I personally wouldn't view as an improvement over the status quo.
post #19 of 22
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(LA Guy @ May 06 2005,15:19) Are you kidding me?  Japanese have the some of the coolest streetstyle ever.  Change the dress code from "business casual" to "denim" and the Japanese will have a coolest attired office's from here to, well, Tokyo.
Are you kidding me?  Typical Japanese salarymen and bureaucrats look far worse in casual clothes than they do in their weekday rumpled suits.  The fact that a narrow band of mostly youthful people, geographically limited to mostly a few neighborhoods in Tokyo, have cool streetwear does not mean that a conversion to business casual will benefit the overall dress of the (stereo)typical oyaji/sarariman. A switch to business casual might increase the incidence of loud plaid pants worn with rumpled blazers on the Marunouchi-sen during the week, which I personally wouldn't view as an improvement over the status quo.
Well, the original post was sort of a joke, but we have a postdoc, a very reserved guy, in our group, from Tokyo, who definitely livens up the hallways with his plaid pants mixed with striped knitwear. He wears CdG (Comme des Garcons almost exclusively, with some Y-3 and some other Japanese brands thrown in occasionally. I wouldn't/couldn't/shouldn't do it, but he looks in his element. Gotta give the man his props.
post #20 of 22
personally, i would prefer a business park full of 'Fruits' to one populated by those objectively wierd short-sleeve suits. those things are just wrong. ... i guess the long jacket with kulots looks okay, albeit odd, but the mandals have got to go. at least make it some traditional looking japanese footwear that agrees more with the pseudo-kimono. /andrew - thinks he's turning japanese, he really thinks so
post #21 of 22
i'm about as upset as when the Cobbler's site changed and a lot of it disappeared.
post #22 of 22
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The shalwar kameez looks so much better and is so much more effective.
That's not the shalwar kameez I know. The shalwar traditionally goes approximately to the knees. Also, while the trousers are at least hemmed to the proper length - trousers cut to expose the ankles is in fact a sunnah or tradition of Prophet Muhammed, peace be upon him, that enlightened Mughal emperors spread throughout the Subcontinent - besides that they are all wrong. They are not properly finished at the cuffs, and are tailored rather than billowy. Also, gentlemen generally wear shalwar and kameez of the same cloth, though ladies will mix and match to a greater extent. Indeed, the only man of whom I know whose sartorial signature is a pair of tailored wool pants under a kameez is one Osama bin Laden.
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