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Best 80s film - Page 5

post #61 of 75
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As much as I despise Gedee Watanabee for acting as the uncle tom and selling out by taking that role, I despise the entertainment industry even more which did not offer him any other roles except those the racially insensitive roles like Long Dong.
Wow... I think thats a pretty harsh attitude to take. Uncle Tom? I mean, The guy was on E.R. If thats the case, I think that white people all over the world should be pissed at Anthony Micheal Hall for portraying their race as weak ass virginal nerds that wouldn't know what to do with a woman EVEN IF THEY WERE SMART ENOUGH TO CREATE ONE.
post #62 of 75
American Psycho. The best. By some distance.
post #63 of 75
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Just a nitpick_  I'd say Dumb and Dumberer was intellectually and artistically offensive too, in that its sheer lack of any merit on any level could embitter any cinemagoer.  Still I bet it was better than Pearl Harbor because it didn't have Ben Affleck.
There was a character named Ching Chong. And, the two characters in the movie did the old tired joke of the white men making fun of the Chinese language by making up their own nonsensical version of chinese and using 'ching chong' a lot in it. I've seen those type of sterotypes and jokes before. But, this isn't the 80s anymore. I would have hoped we could have moved past such 'humour' already.
post #64 of 75
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I've seen those type of sterotypes and jokes before. But, this isn't the 80s anymore. I would have hoped we could have moved past such 'humour' already.
Never.  The most you can hope for is someone exploiting the stereotype and depicting some William Hung type kick the crap out of some big dude, repeatedly dunking their head in the toilet and screaming "who's the man now, bitch?.?"
post #65 of 75
Thread Starter 
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Originally Posted by christian,May 27 2005,13:33
If thats the case, I think that white people all over the world should be pissed at Anthony Micheal Hall for portraying their race as weak ass virginal nerds that wouldn't know what to do with a woman EVEN IF THEY WERE SMART ENOUGH TO CREATE ONE.
I've never watched Weird Science, but how in the hell does it explain that it could create a physical woman by a computer??.. I'm pretty much ignorant about computers, but even I know this is impossible. Why didn't they simply explain that they created a robot?
post #66 of 75
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I've never watched Weird Science, but how in the hell does it explain that it could create a physical woman by a computer??.. I'm pretty much ignorant about computers, but even I know this is impossible. Why didn't they simply explain that they created a robot?
see, it's naysayers like you that are holding back the human potential. anybody see the 'Dead Pool' tv series? i thought A.M.H. was pretty cool in that. hardly recognized him from his earlier, uh, oevre. /andrew
post #67 of 75
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anybody see the 'Dead Pool' tv series? i thought A.M.H. was pretty cool in that. hardly recognized him from his earlier, uh, oevre.
You mean "Dead Zone", right? I just had an image of Anthony Michael Hall (the white man's Gedde Watanabe) as Dirty Harry. Of course, then he'd be Slightly Unkempt Harry.
post #68 of 75
yeah. pool, zone, what's the difference. i grew up with a swimming zone in the back yard, so i always get them mixed up.
post #69 of 75
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anybody see the 'Dead Pool' tv series? i thought A.M.H. was pretty cool in that. hardly recognized him from his earlier, uh, oevre.
That's the point. Anthony Michael Hall can branch out from the roles he played where he's 'cool', while Geedee Watanbee is still stuck playing the same sterotypes. I just heard that Molly Ringwald is interested in doing a sequel to sixteen candles. She finally realized her career peaked in the 80s. I can't wait to see what Long Duck Dong is like after 20 years and what's happening to him now.
post #70 of 75
Let's tie this thread together a bit, shall we? Gung Ho -- all about an imminent Japanese takeover of the US auto industry.  Also starring ... (drumroll) ... Gedde Watanabe.
post #71 of 75
Nice ribbons... Those are ribbons of SHAME... I'd wear em on the inside if I were you.
post #72 of 75
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Let's tie this thread together a bit, shall we? Gung Ho -- all about an imminent Japanese takeover of the US auto industry.  Also starring ... (drumroll) ... Gedde Watanabe.
I do believe that you've started a new game which could take on sociocultural implications, manton: Six Degrees of Gedde Watanabe.
post #73 of 75
Some of the tops: Indiana Jones movies Empire Strikes Back Who Framed Roger Rabbit has held up remarkably well Favorites at the time: Heathers (a great movie) Weird Science Breakfast Club Back to the Future Princess Bride Ferris Bueller's Day Off Ghostbusters Top Gun Stand By Me Hoosiers Lethal Weapon The Lost Boys
post #74 of 75
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(christian @ May 06 2005,16:35)
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Originally Posted by matadorpoeta,May 05 2005,18:20
at least '16 candles' had long duck dong.
Now, that movie was incredibly racist with that character with his chop suey english and total emmasculation of asian males. I hope today's movies wouldn't be allowed to get away with such imagery. Frankly, I never understood the appeal of any of John Hughes' work. Then again, his movies were geared towards a female audience. Definitely, not a guy movie unless you had to watch it on a date to showcase your 'sensitivity'.
Emmasculation of asian males??  Didn't he get laid in that movie?  Why are people so sensetive about their race?  I'm a white man in America that doesn't fit into any stereotypical niche, but I don't cry everytime a white man is portrayed in a negative sterotypical way...instead I laugh. Eric
Eric, Here's a list titled the invisible knapsack of white privilege. Some of the points are a bit too much, but you get the point of what it's like living as a colored minority in america: 1. I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time. 2. I can avoid spending time with people whom I was trained to mistrust and who have learned to mistrust my kind or me. 3. If I should need to move, I can be pretty sure of renting or purchasing housing in an area which I can afford and in which I would want to live. 4. I can be pretty sure that my neighbors in such a location will be neutral or pleasant to me. 5. I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed. 6. I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented. 7. When I am told about our national heritage or about "civilization," I am shown that people of my color made it what it is. 8. I can be sure that my children will be given curricular materials that testify to the existence of their race. 9. If I want to, I can be pretty sure of finding a publisher for this piece on white privilege. 10. I can be pretty sure of having my voice heard in a group in which I am the only member of my race. 11. I can be casual about whether or not to listen to another person's voice in a group in which s/he is the only member of his/her race. 12. I can go into a music shop and count on finding the music of my race represented, into a supermarket and find the staple foods which fit with my cultural traditions, into a hairdresser's shop and find someone who can cut my hair. 13. Whether I use checks, credit cards or cash, I can count on my skin color not to work against the appearance of financial reliability. 14. I can arrange to protect my children most of the time from people who might not like them. 15. I do not have to educate my children to be aware of systemic racism for their own daily physical protection. 16. I can be pretty sure that my children's teachers and employers will tolerate them if they fit school and workplace norms; my chief worries about them do not concern others' attitudes toward their race. 17. I can talk with my mouth full and not have people put this down to my color. 18. I can swear, or dress in second hand clothes, or not answer letters, without having people attribute these choices to the bad morals, the poverty or the illiteracy of my race. 19. I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial. 20. I can do well in a challenging situation without being called a credit to my race. 21. I am never asked to speak for all the people of my racial group. 22. I can remain oblivious of the language and customs of persons of color who constitute the world's majority without feeling in my culture any penalty for such oblivion. 23. I can criticize our government and talk about how much I fear its policies and behavior without being seen as a cultural outsider. 24. I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the "person in charge", I will be facing a person of my race. 25. If a traffic cop pulls me over or if the IRS audits my tax return, I can be sure I haven't been singled out because of my race. 26. I can easily buy posters, post-cards, picture books, greeting cards, dolls, toys and children's magazines featuring people of my race. 27. I can go home from most meetings of organizations I belong to feeling somewhat tied in, rather than isolated, out-of-place, outnumbered, unheard, held at a distance or feared. 28. I can be pretty sure that an argument with a colleague of another race is more likely to jeopardize her/his chances for advancement than to jeopardize mine. 29. I can be pretty sure that if I argue for the promotion of a person of another race, or a program centering on race, this is not likely to cost me heavily within my present setting, even if my colleagues disagree with me. 30. If I declare there is a racial issue at hand, or there isn't a racial issue at hand, my race will lend me more credibility for either position than a person of color will have. 31. I can choose to ignore developments in minority writing and minority activist programs, or disparage them, or learn from them, but in any case, I can find ways to be more or less protected from negative consequences of any of these choices. 32. My culture gives me little fear about ignoring the perspectives and powers of people of other races. 33. I am not made acutely aware that my shape, bearing or body odor will be taken as a reflection on my race. 34. I can worry about racism without being seen as self-interested or self-seeking. 35. I can take a job with an affirmative action employer without having my co-workers on the job suspect that I got it because of my race. 36. If my day, week or year is going badly, I need not ask of each negative episode or situation whether it had racial overtones. 37. I can be pretty sure of finding people who would be willing to talk with me and advise me about my next steps, professionally. 38. I can think over many options, social, political, imaginative or professional, without asking whether a person of my race would be accepted or allowed to do what I want to do. 39. I can be late to a meeting without having the lateness reflect on my race. 40. I can choose public accommodation without fearing that people of my race cannot get in or will be mistreated in the places I have chosen. 41. I can be sure that if I need legal or medical help, my race will not work against me. 42. I can arrange my activities so that I will never have to experience feelings of rejection owing to my race. 43. If I have low credibility as a leader I can be sure that my race is not the problem. 44. I can easily find academic courses and institutions which give attention only to people of my race. 45. I can expect figurative language and imagery in all of the arts to testify to experiences of my race. 46. I can chose blemish cover or bandages in "flesh" color and have them more or less match my skin. 47. I can travel alone or with my spouse without expecting embarrassment or hostility in those who deal with us. 48. I have no difficulty finding neighborhoods where people approve of our household. 49. My children are given texts and classes which implicitly support our kind of family unit and do not turn them against my choice of domestic partnership. 50. I will feel welcomed and "normal" in the usual walks of public life, institutional and social.
post #75 of 75
Wow. Better go find Gedde Watanabe and stone him to death.
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