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The Official Whisk(e)y Thread - Page 4

post #46 of 65
I had a chance to try Baker's Bourbon (also a Jim Beam product) yesterday. It is a 7 year old, 107 proof bourbon. I found it very enjoyable. At 107 proof, it has a good kick to it, but it isn't the run-away freight train of Bookers (which can run as high as 127 proof). Overall, a very smooth, but full, taste. I'd love to tell you that it has a strong taste of caramel with hints of vanilla and leather (or something similar), but I have no idea where serious tasters come up with all of these flavors (undoubtedly a deficiency of my palate). Recommended.
post #47 of 65
Quote:
Quote:
(Luc-Emmanuel @ May 04 2005,14:13) Burried deep in my pirate's cove, I have a bottle of Blanton's single barrel, and this stuff is just mind-blowing. About 65 proof, a drop is enough to set the house on fire.
Is that really just 65 proof, or is it 65 percent (130 proof--Booker's territory)? The Blanton's SB I have is 93 proof (46 1/2 percent).
sorry, my Blanton's is exactly "131.7 proof". single barrel, uncut. Really nasty stuff .luc
post #48 of 65
Quote:
Suntory "Hibiki" 17 year. Beautiful, smooth, mellow. Almost like a fine cognac. The 21 year old is good too. I hope one day to try the 30 year.
This is indeed great stuff. I had a bottle given to me but it's sadly almost finished. My regular sip is Balvenie Doublewood and Jameson, when I'm feeling cheap or recon I won't notice the difference B
post #49 of 65
I have seen suntory but never tried any. does anybody know what "type" of whisky is would be considered?
post #50 of 65
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I have seen suntory but never tried any. does anybody know what "type" of whisky is would be considered?
Judging from the process described on their bottle and box and elsewhere, it's essentially a single malt. I've only had the 12-year--can't find the 18+ around here--but I imagine that Hibiki and Hakashu (sp?) are distilled in the same manner. I love Suntory, but the taste is more reminiscent of bourbon to me--extremely sweet. And whoever mentioned Balvenie earlier as a go-to malt is right on the money--it's wonderfully smooth, and a great value (can be had for as little as $25 sometimes).
post #51 of 65
Anyone read the newest issue of Esquire? There is a short blurb on what they call "The Best {Cheap} Whisky In America" or words to that effect. They say its Rittenhouse Bottled In Bond Straight Rye. Anyone tried it? I'd like to get my hands on some, but its not shipped to Michigan. Anyway I could PayPal someone to pick me up some?
post #52 of 65
Has anyone tried Black Bottle? It's supposed to be a very good and reasonably priced blend of Islay malts. I don't know if it's available Stateside.
post #53 of 65
Thread Starter 
For those of you with access to a Trader Joe's, they've introduced their own bottling of Bowmore 18 for $39.95--A complete steal.
post #54 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyto
Judging from the process described on their bottle and box and elsewhere, it's essentially a single malt. I've only had the 12-year--can't find the 18+ around here--but I imagine that Hibiki and Hakashu (sp?) are distilled in the same manner.

Suntory bottles a number of different varieties of whisky. The most commonly-seen ones, at least in the US, are Yamazaki 12 YO and Yamazaki 18 YO. Both of these are single-malt whiskies, pot-distilled twice (like most Scotch), and aged in Japanese oak. There are also single-malt offerings from Suntory's other distillery, Hakushu, and many blends, the most distinguished of which is probably Hibiki.
post #55 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJMan
Has anyone tried Black Bottle? It's supposed to be a very good and reasonably priced blend of Islay malts. I don't know if it's available Stateside.

Well, not that it matters much to you now that you're in Freedom, but it is available in the US at Binny's and probably elsewhere. It is very good.
post #56 of 65
Rye...
The Old Van Winkle Rye and Sazerac 18 YO mentioned earlier are very good, if you like these, I also recommend Black Maple Hill 18 YO. They are a bottler, not a distiller, and I don't know who made their most recent batch, but it is very good. Previously they have bought whiskey from Van Winkle and Even Kulsveen. They bottle bourbon, too, offering an 11, 14, 16 and 21 year old. I have had the 11 and the 21 and they are both good in their respective niches.
If you can find Hirsch Rye, it is very similar to the Van Winkle Rye, in fact I believe Hirsch got the better barrels from the old Michter distillery and I will take the Hirsch over the Van Winkle if I can find it.
Classic Cask also has great rye. I have had a 22 and a 21 YO. The price on the last batch has gone through the roof, $135 US.

The Van Winkle Special Reserve 12 YO is great bourbon, haven't seen it mentioned yet so thought I would say it.
post #57 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcusey
Suntory bottles a number of different varieties of whisky. The most commonly-seen ones, at least in the US, are Yamazaki 12 YO and Yamazaki 18 YO. Both of these are single-malt whiskies, pot-distilled twice (like most Scotch), and aged in Japanese oak. There are also single-malt offerings from Suntory's other distillery, Hakushu, and many blends, the most distinguished of which is probably Hibiki.

Suntory makes excellent products. Even some of their blended whiskies, which are very inexpensive here in Japan, are quite nice.

I was told that the overall quality of their blends is improving because of poor sales of the single malts in the last decade. The result is that higher quality, and older, whiskies are being used in some of the less expensive blends.
post #58 of 65
Pappy van Winkle.
post #59 of 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alter
Suntory makes excellent products. Even some of their blended whiskies, which are very inexpensive here in Japan, are quite nice.

I was told that the overall quality of their blends is improving because of poor sales of the single malts in the last decade. The result is that higher quality, and older, whiskies are being used in some of the less expensive blends.

One thing that frustrates me is the lack of availability for Suntory products (and indeed, for any Japanese whisky, including Nikka, which I am dying to try) here in the US. As I wrote previously, the only Japanese whisky that I have ever seen here is the Yamazaki 12 YO and 18 YO. I would think that there could be a market for the rest. Of course, that may just be wishful thinking on my part: I want to try them, so I assume that others will, too.
post #60 of 65
JCusey- There are a few shops in Japantown San Francisco that have a pretty good selection on Japanese whisky. I am not a big whisky drinker, so I do not know which brands you are interested in. PM me if you want the names of the shops.
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