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Shirt cuffs

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have a problem with shirt cuffs. RTW shirts typically have two buttons to allow the cuff to be made smaller or larger. My problem is that one button makes the cuff too tight and the other makes it too loose (tends to fall onto my hand). I don't have such a problem with French cuffs. Does it mean that the cuff size I need is somewhere in between (but then I should have at least one shirt with cuffs of such a size) or am I just weird? Mathieu
post #2 of 10
Not at all weird. However, buttons are extremely easy to move. Just cut them off and put one where it should go. That's what I do, when I care enough. I always at least cut off the button I don't use.
post #3 of 10
What are the difference between french and barrel cuffs?
post #4 of 10
French cuffs are the type that fold over and then together, and are linked together with a cuff link or silk knot. Barrel cuffs are the more standard type where the hole side wraps around over the button side and the button goes through.
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
I did cut off the button I don't use when I could determine which one I liked least. One problem is when shirts have pseudo French cuffs: there is a buttonhole in between the two buttons. Would you sew the button on top on that buttonhole? Mathieu
post #6 of 10
Quote:
(J) However, buttons are extremely easy to move. Just cut them off and put one where it should go. French cuffs are the type that fold over and then together, and are linked together with a cuff link or silk knot. Barrel cuffs are the more standard type where the hole side wraps around over the button side and the button goes through.
Looking for a job?
post #7 of 10
While we're talking about cuffs, do you like cuffs fused or canvased. I find that fused cuffs get caught in the suit arm and by the watch. Its like wearing a cardboard box. Any opinions?
post #8 of 10
Quote:
I did cut off the button I don't use when I could determine which one I liked least. One problem is when shirts have pseudo French cuffs: there is a buttonhole in between the two buttons. Would you sew the button on top on that buttonhole? Mathieu
I hate that. My Pringle shirt has that problem - the ideal spot would be in the middle of the link hole. I suppose you could pretty easily sew it right where it goes - just sew it on across both sides of the link hole. Alex, actually, I might be, but I can only handle shirtmaking for an hour a day at most. And shirtmakers who attack on Saturday mornings when I'm hung over...
post #9 of 10
I think the detail most people don't think about is the way the sleeve is fitted into the cuff.

Obviously, the sleeve is going to be larger than the cuff, because the arm is larger than the wrist, and in any event the shirt sleeve needs more circumference than the arm itself. While the sleeve naturally narrows towards the cuff, in good shirts it will still be larger than the cuff where the two meet.

The most common way to deal with this is to put one or more pleats in the sleeve to make it fit the cuff.

Another way to do this is to rouche the sleeve into the cuff. This is done with a series of very small ruffles in the stitching of the sleeve where it meets the cuff. TM Lewin used to do this, but ceased making shirts this way about ten years ago. Is there any other shirtmaker that rouches the sleeve into the cuff in this way any more?
post #10 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dingo View Post
I think the detail most people don't think about is the way the sleeve is fitted into the cuff.

Obviously, the sleeve is going to be larger than the cuff, because the arm is larger than the wrist, and in any event the shirt sleeve needs more circumference than the arm itself. While the sleeve naturally narrows towards the cuff, in good shirts it will still be larger than the cuff where the two meet.

The most common way to deal with this is to put one or more pleats in the sleeve to make it fit the cuff.

Another way to do this is to rouche the sleeve into the cuff. This is done with a series of very small ruffles in the stitching of the sleeve where it meets the cuff. TM Lewin used to do this, but ceased making shirts this way about ten years ago. Is there any other shirtmaker that rouches the sleeve into the cuff in this way any more?

Somehow i don't think the op is going to see your response.
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