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Big screen TV’s

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
So, my Toshiba 55" CRT projection TV broke and went out to buy another one, but having second thoughts if I bought the best "˜bang for my buck' as it were. Any recommendations? Should I stick with CRT or is DLP really that good? Jon.
post #2 of 31
I have a Sony LCD rear-projection set (the Grand Wega 4th generation--"GWIV" in AV geek lingo). I am quite happy with it. Some people don't like the GWIV sets because of their response to blacks and dark grays, but I like mine just fine. DLP sets are great if you aren't subject to "rainbow vision" that some people experience due to the color wheel synchronization. Both DLP and LCD-projection sets are great because of their small form factor. They are very thin and lightweight, so they fit well into small rooms, though not as well as a flat panel plasma or LCD set. As far as projection TVs go, LCD and DLP units are preferable to CRT because they are not subject to image burn-in, which may be important if you watch a lot of media that isn't formatted in the same aspect ratio as the set. For example, I hate to stretch standard definition TV to fit a 16:9 screen, and I hate to cut off the top and bottom using a zoom mode, so I just watch with the black bars at the sides.
post #3 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I have a Sony LCD rear-projection set (the Grand Wega 4th generation--"GWIV" in AV geek lingo). I am quite happy with it. Some people don't like the GWIV sets because of their response to blacks and dark grays, but I like mine just fine. DLP sets are great if you aren't subject to "rainbow vision" that some people experience due to the color wheel synchronization. Both DLP and LCD-projection sets are great because of their small form factor. They are very thin and lightweight, so they fit well into small rooms, though not as well as a flat panel plasma or LCD set. As far as projection TVs go, LCD and DLP units are preferable to CRT because they are not subject to image burn-in, which may be important if you watch a lot of media that isn't formatted in the same aspect ratio as the set. For example, I hate to stretch standard definition TV to fit a 16:9 screen, and I hate to cut off the top and bottom using a zoom mode, so I just watch with the black bars at the sides.
Image burn-in? Jon.
post #4 of 31
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Image burn-in?
Yes. CRTs that are left on and displaying static images will have that static image "burned" into the screen. You see it a lot in plasma or CRT monitors that are left on all the time showing things with stock tickers or static logos that always cover a particular part of the screen.
post #5 of 31
Thread Starter 
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(imageWIS @ April 26 2005,20:17) Image burn-in?
Yes. CRTs that are left on and displaying static images will have that static image "burned" into the screen. You see it a lot in plasma or CRT monitors that are left on all the time showing things with stock tickers or static logos that always cover a particular part of the screen.
You mean like, the NBC logo, at the corner of the screen? Will it always be "burned" on? Or does it go aweay if the TV is off for a while? And how long do you have to have the TV on for that to occur? Jon.
post #6 of 31
Yes, it will be permanently burned in. I'm not sure what the exact time required for burn in is, but I think I've heard conservative estimates around six hours. This will also depend on the display options you're using (contrast, brightness, etc.).
post #7 of 31
Thread Starter 
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Yes, it will be permanently burned in. I'm not sure what the exact time required for burn in is, but I think I've heard conservative estimates around six hours. This will also depend on the display options you're using (contrast, brightness, etc.).
Well, that's just great... Good thing I don't watch CNN Headline News or the like... I assume that if you watch, say the History Channel, the "˜H' would burn if permanently on, but since commercials pop-up several times during a show, that should help dissipate the problem? Jon.
post #8 of 31
A lot of channels, Fox News for example, have rotating symbols in the bottom corners so that the image can't burn in. Stock tickers, however, don't move at all. They should probably try moving them from the top to the bottom of the screen every hour or so.
post #9 of 31
Thread Starter 
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A lot of channels, Fox News for example, have rotating symbols in the bottom corners so that the image can't burn in. Stock tickers, however, don't move at all. They should probably try moving them from the top to the bottom of the screen every hour or so.
I see, but I normally watch only 2 channels with non-rotating logos: The History Channel and Bravo (and then only to watch reruns of The West Wing). Will I get burn in from them? And how come I never had any problems with my Toshiba, which I owned since 1997? Jon.
post #10 of 31
If you aren't watching a lot of continuous TV with the same image, it won't be a problem. One of my primary TVs is a 10 year old tube TV with no burn-in. The problem with burn-in on the newer tube TVs and CRT-based projection sets is that standard definition signals do not fill up the whole screen on a 16:9 widescreen TV--the sides are black bars unless you stretch or zoom the picture. Likewise, if you watch DVDs that are not formatted in the exact aspect ratio of the screen, you have the letterboxing bars at the top and bottom. Repeated viewing with those bars in the same place can cause burn-in.
post #11 of 31
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Image burn-in? Jon.
I have 2, a 43 Panasonic and a 70 Sony, and I have not had any image burn in's....the only way you would get that is by pausing your picture for to long a period with Tivo or a DVD player, or by running a computer or Playstation and not turning it onto a screen saver.
post #12 of 31
Thread Starter 
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(imageWIS @ April 26 2005,23:17) Image burn-in? Jon.
I have 2, a 43 Panasonic and a 70 Sony, and I have not had any image burn in's....the only way you would get that is by pausing your picture for to long a period with Tivo or a DVD player, or by running a computer or Playstation and not turning it onto a screen saver.
What type of screen are they? DLP, Plasma, CRT Projection ? Jon.
post #13 of 31
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Originally Posted by nightowl6261a,April 27 2005,16:07
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Originally Posted by imageWIS,April 26 2005,23:17
Image burn-in? Jon.
I have 2, a 43 Panasonic and a 70 Sony, and I have not had any image burn in's....the only way you would get that is by pausing your picture for to long a period with Tivo or a DVD player, or by running a computer or Playstation and not turning it onto a screen saver.
What type of screen are they? DLP, Plasma, CRT Projection ? Jon.
LCD rear projection, sorry Jon, ecluded that from the quote part
post #14 of 31
If memory serves, the LCDs are not subject to burn-in. This has been a problem with CRTs and the plasma screens are said to be even more sensitive to this. This is supposed to be one of the great drawbacks of the plasma screens. The burn-in is in both cases permanent. On a similar note, many equipment will have a 'screen-saver' mode after periods of inactivity where the output is dimmed. My Philips DVD player dims its picture after a few minutes during standby or paused disks. B
post #15 of 31
I have a Pioneer Elite PRO-630. 52 inch screen, I think. It is rear projection/CRT. I got it about 2 years ago. It has worked flawlessly and has been spectacular for watching DVD movies (97% of what I use it for). I've had no regrets at all. The finish on the TV's "box" is very nice too by the way. I ruled out LCD due to concerns over, um, I can't recall now. Maybe it was just that the technology was new in TVs 2 years ago and it was alot more expensive then too. The reviews of LCDs from back then were not 100% positive either -- I just can't recall what the probs were. I loved plasma too, but for the size TV I wanted, it was too expensive. Other CRTs I considered at were primarily Mitsubishi's. Two years ago, Mitsu seemed to be leading the way in big screens. Now that I think about it, there was a website called "www.consumerreview.com" that was incredibly helpful in picking out stereo/home theater equipment. Anyone could post their experiences with a particular model of a multitude of products.
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